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Omar Abdel-Aleem Et Al., Order On Third-Party Defendants' Motion To Dismiss The Third-Party Complaint, Melvin K. Westmoreland 2018 Fulton County Superior Court Judge

Omar Abdel-Aleem Et Al., Order On Third-Party Defendants' Motion To Dismiss The Third-Party Complaint, Melvin K. Westmoreland

Georgia Business Court Opinions

No abstract provided.


Hb 192 - Banking And Finance, Caroline G. Mayson, Jesse C. Moore 2018 Georgia State University College of Law

Hb 192 - Banking And Finance, Caroline G. Mayson, Jesse C. Moore

Georgia State University Law Review

The Act changes the provisions relating to the responsibilities and standard of care for directors and officers of banks, trust companies, and corporations. The Act codifies the business judgment rule. The operative liability standard for directors and officers is gross negligence, as opposed to simple negligence, and directors and officers may rely on other individuals in the performance of their duties. A rebuttable presumption exists that directors and officers act in good faith.


Newsroom: From Farm To School 1-2-2018, Roger Williams University School of Law 2018 Roger Williams University

Newsroom: From Farm To School 1-2-2018, Roger Williams University School Of Law

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Opacity, Fragility, & Power: Lessons From The Law Enforcement Response To The Financial Crisis, Gregory M. Gilchrist 2018 Brooklyn Law School

Opacity, Fragility, & Power: Lessons From The Law Enforcement Response To The Financial Crisis, Gregory M. Gilchrist

Brooklyn Law Review

Review of Mary Kreiner Ramirez and Steven A. Ramirez, THE CARE FOR THE CORPORATE DEATH PENALTY: RESTORING LAW AND ORDER ON WALL STREET (New York 2017) The Case for the Corporate Death Penalty, by Mary Kreiner Ramirez and Steven A. Ramirez, argues that the limited law enforcement response to the 2008 financial crisis represented an unprecedented failure of the rule of law. It further maintains that the weak response by law enforcement was caused by the economic and political power of the largest financial institutions and those who run them. It concludes that the failure to vigorously prosecute the people ...


Regulating The “Too Big To Jail” Financial Institutions, Jerry W. Markham 2018 Brooklyn Law School

Regulating The “Too Big To Jail” Financial Institutions, Jerry W. Markham

Brooklyn Law Review

This article addresses the “too big to jail” regulatory model in which large banks pay hundreds of billions of dollars to settle multiple and duplicative regulatory charges brought by a horde of state, federal, and even foreign regulators. The banks pay those massive settlements in order to keep their banking charters and to obtain immunity from prosecution for senior executives. In turn, regulators benefit from the headlines these fines generate. Much criticism has been directed at these settlements because the banks are allowed to continue business as usual and no senior executives are jailed. Other critics contend that these settlements ...


The Fiduciary Principle Of Insider Trading Needs Revision, Roberta S. Karmel 2018 Brooklyn Law School

The Fiduciary Principle Of Insider Trading Needs Revision, Roberta S. Karmel

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


(At Least) Thirteen Ways Of Looking At Election Lies, Helen Norton 2018 University of Colorado Law School

(At Least) Thirteen Ways Of Looking At Election Lies, Helen Norton

Articles

Lies take many forms. Because lies vary so greatly in their motivations and consequences (among many other qualities), philosophers have long sought to catalog them to help make sense of their diversity and complexity. Legal scholars too have classified lies in various ways to explain why we punish some and protect others. This symposium essay offers yet another taxonomy of lies, focusing specifically on election lies — that is, lies told during or about elections. We can divide and describe election lies in a wide variety of ways: by speaker, by motive, by subject matter, by audience, by means of delivery ...


The Dragon And The Eagle: Reforming China’S Securities Ipo Laws In The U.S. Model, Pros And Cons, Stuart R. Cohn, Miao Yinzhi 2018 Levin College of Law, University of Florida

The Dragon And The Eagle: Reforming China’S Securities Ipo Laws In The U.S. Model, Pros And Cons, Stuart R. Cohn, Miao Yinzhi

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

China is about to undergo a major reform of its securities offering and listing processes. Since the inception of China’s securities market in the early 1990s, the government has exercised tight control to determine which companies will be allowed to engage in initial public offerings and become listed on a national exchange. The system has led to both corruption and favoritism and has blocked numerable companies from access to capital markets. With the ascension in 2013 of Xi Jinping and Li Keqiang as the heads of the Chinese Communist Party and Premier, the government adopted reform of the market ...


Examining The Jpmorgan “Princeling” Settlement: Insight Into Current Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (Fcpa) Interpretation And Enforcement, Beverley Earle, Anita Cava 2018 Bentley University

Examining The Jpmorgan “Princeling” Settlement: Insight Into Current Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (Fcpa) Interpretation And Enforcement, Beverley Earle, Anita Cava

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

Shortly after the November 2016 U.S. Presidential election, JP Morgan Chase and JP Morgan Securities (Asia Pacific) settled and signed a non-prosecution agreement (NPA) in which they agreed to pay over $264 million to the DOJ, SEC and the Federal Reserve. The entities acknowledged that they had engaged in quid pro quo arrangements with Chinese officials for a number of years, employing relatives deemed “princelings” in return for favored treatment. Although JP Morgan Chase had ended the program in 2013, evidence of willful and widespread violations of the FCPA resulted in little prosecutorial credit. We examine this and other ...


The Corporate Governance Of National Security, Andrew Verstein 2018 Wake Forest University School of Law

The Corporate Governance Of National Security, Andrew Verstein

Washington University Law Review

At hundreds of companies, the government installs former spies and military officers to run the business without shareholder oversight, putting security before profits in order to protect vital projects from potentially treasonous influences. Through procedures I call “National Security Corporate Governance,” corporate boardrooms have quietly become instruments of national defense, marrying the efficiency norms of corporate law and the protective ambitions of national security. How is this achieved, and how successfully? Using a variety of research approaches – including Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests, archival searches, telephone interviews, and in-person conversations with industry insiders – this Article illuminates a secretive government ...


Algorithmic Entities, Lynn M. LoPucki 2018 UCLA School of Law

Algorithmic Entities, Lynn M. Lopucki

Washington University Law Review

In a 2014 article, Professor Shawn Bayern demonstrated that anyone can confer legal personhood on an autonomous computer algorithm by putting it in control of a limited liability company. Bayern’s demonstration coincided with the development of “autonomous” online businesses that operate independently of their human owners—accepting payments in online currencies and contracting with human agents to perform the off-line aspects of their businesses. About the same time, leading technologists Elon Musk, Bill Gates, and Stephen Hawking said that they regard human-level artificial intelligence as an existential threat to the human race.

This Article argues that algorithmic entities—legal ...


Exploring The Relationship Between Executive Compensation And Corporate Mergers And Acquisitions, Akiva Stern 2018 University of Windsor

Exploring The Relationship Between Executive Compensation And Corporate Mergers And Acquisitions, Akiva Stern

Major Papers

Corporate Governance is one of the most important aspects of corporate life. The role requires individuals to have a moderate, if not excellent command of not only the industry they are operating within, but the basic tenants of many disciplines including law and finance. It is therefore important to not only view how these disciplines contribute to their knowledge individually, but also how they might work together to provide a better insight into governing a company on a day-to-day basis.

A predominant decision that often comes under scrutiny is the relationship between executive compensation and M&A Activity. This paper ...


Constitutive Compliance, Edward Janger 2018 Brooklyn Law School

Constitutive Compliance, Edward Janger

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Horizontal Shareholding And Antitrust Policy, Fiona M. Scott Morton, Herbert J. Hovenkamp 2018 Yale University

Horizontal Shareholding And Antitrust Policy, Fiona M. Scott Morton, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

“Horizontal shareholding” occurs when one or more equity funds own shares of competitors operating in a concentrated product market. For example, the four largest mutual fund companies might be large shareholders of all the major United States air carriers. A growing body of empirical literature concludes that under these conditions market output in the product market is lower and prices higher than they would otherwise be.

Here we consider how the antitrust laws might be applied to this practice, identifying the issues that courts are likely to encounter and attempting to anticipate litigation problems. We assume that neither the mutual ...


Governance By Contract: The Implications For Corporate Bylaws, Jill E. Fisch 2018 University of Pennsylvania Law School

Governance By Contract: The Implications For Corporate Bylaws, Jill E. Fisch

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Boards and shareholders are increasing using charter and bylaw provisions to customize their corporate governance. Recent examples include forum selection bylaws, majority voting bylaws and advance notice bylaws. Relying on the contractual conception of the corporation, Delaware courts have accorded substantial deference to board-adopted bylaw provisions, even those that limit shareholder rights.

This Article challenges the rationale for deference under the contractual approach. With respect to corporate bylaws, the Article demonstrates that shareholder power to adopt and amend the bylaws is, under Delaware law, more limited than the board’s power to do so. As a result, shareholders cannot effectively ...


Does Shareholder Voting Matter? Evidence From The Takeover Market, Paul Mason, Usha Rodrigues, Mike Stegemoller, Steven Utke 2018 Baylor University

Does Shareholder Voting Matter? Evidence From The Takeover Market, Paul Mason, Usha Rodrigues, Mike Stegemoller, Steven Utke

Scholarly Works

Voting rights are a basic shareholder-protection mechanism. Outside of the core voting requirements state law imposes (election of directors and votes on fundamental changes), federal law grants shareholders additional voting rights. But these rights introduce concomitant costs into corporate governance. Each grant of a voting right thus invites the question: is the benefit achieved worth the cost the vote imposes?

The question is not merely a theoretical one. Recently the SEC, concerned about Nasdaq’s potential weakening of shareholder voting protections, has lamented that little evidence exists on the value of the shareholder vote. This Article provides that evidence. It ...


The Challenges Of Conscience In A World Of Compromise, Amy J. Sepinwall 2018 University of Pennsylvania

The Challenges Of Conscience In A World Of Compromise, Amy J. Sepinwall

Legal Studies and Business Ethics Papers

The process of crafting and passing legislation might be thought to be the locus of compromise par excellence.1 Yet, where the law that results impinges upon moral or religious belief or practice, the issue of compromise arises anew, in both senses of the word: Individuals who oppose the law on moral or religious grounds believe that their political obedeience will compromise them in a fundamental way. Their plea for an exemption from the objectionable legal requirement is, then, a bid for further compromise.2 Compromise in the first sense concerns an undercutting of the self, while compromise in the ...


Decentralized Public Ledger Systems And Securities Law: New Applications Of Blockchain Technology And The Revitalization Of Sections 11 And 12(A)(2) Of The Securities Act Of 1933, Kelsey Bolin 2018 Washington University School of Law

Decentralized Public Ledger Systems And Securities Law: New Applications Of Blockchain Technology And The Revitalization Of Sections 11 And 12(A)(2) Of The Securities Act Of 1933, Kelsey Bolin

Washington University Law Review

When Bitcoin launched in 2009, it was the first virtual cryptocurrency to gain popularity and attain widespread use. Much attention has been paid to Bitcoin’s well-publicized advances and setbacks as the world’s foremost virtual currency. Less attention has been paid, however, to the decentralized public ledger technology that enables Bitcoin to function. That technology is just as innovative as Bitcoin itself. Decentralized public ledgers are a revolution in digital data storage and have the “potential to fundamentally shift the way in which society operates.”

This Note will examine one such societal shift—a change in how shareholders access ...


Evolving Norms Of Corporate Social Responsibility: Lessons Learned From The European Union Directive On Non-Financial Reporting, Constance Z. Wagner 2018 Saint Louis University School of Law

Evolving Norms Of Corporate Social Responsibility: Lessons Learned From The European Union Directive On Non-Financial Reporting, Constance Z. Wagner

All Faculty Scholarship

This article examines an important development in the field of corporate social responsibility, namely theadoption of a 2014 European Union Directive (“2014 EU Directive”) mandating non-financial reporting by certain large companies. Such disclosure has traditionally been provided by businesses on a voluntary basis, but the 2014 EU Directive reflects an emerging global trends toward mandatory reporting. Such trend emerged in response to the perceived low quantity and poor quality of information disclosed voluntarily onsocial and environmental topics of importance to corporate stakeholders. The author analyzes the history and development of policy and legislation on this issue both at the European ...


Beyond Corporate Form: A Response To Dan Depasquale, Surbhi Sarang, And Natalie Bump Vena’S Forging Food Justice Through Cooperatives In New York City, Jonathan Brown 2018 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Beyond Corporate Form: A Response To Dan Depasquale, Surbhi Sarang, And Natalie Bump Vena’S Forging Food Justice Through Cooperatives In New York City, Jonathan Brown

Pace Law Faculty Publications

In their article, Forging Food Justice Through Cooperatives in New York City, Dan DePasquale, Surbhi Sarang, and Natalie Bump Vena (the “Authors”) argue that consumer-owned and worker-owned cooperatives hold promise as a means for advancing policy objectives associated with “food justice,” namely building community wealth and power and providing more affordable access to healthy food in low-income and minority communities. Looking to examples of legislation and policies in other jurisdictions, they advocate for a wide range of policies to promote the viability of cooperatives in New York City, including reforms to cooperative corporation laws and strategies for better allocating funding ...


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