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Balancing Judicial Cognizance And Caution: Whether Transnational Corporations Are Liable For Foreign Bribery Under The Alien Tort Statute, Matt A. Vega 2010 Thomas Goode Jones School of Law, Faulkner University

Balancing Judicial Cognizance And Caution: Whether Transnational Corporations Are Liable For Foreign Bribery Under The Alien Tort Statute, Matt A. Vega

Michigan Journal of International Law

In the process of applying the ATS to foreign bribery, this Article will examine several unresolved issues surrounding this statutory grant. It will seek to (1) determine what constitutes a "violation of the law of nations," (2) refute the proposition that private defendants may be prosecuted under the ATS for only the most shocking and egregious jus cogens violations, (3) determine when and to what extent state action is required in ATS litigation, and (4) examine the limitations of the fundamental principles of international law on ATS litigation.


How To Avoid The Constraints Of Rule 10b-5(B): A First Circuit Guide For Underwriters, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 931 (2010), Eric H. Franklin 2010 UIC School of Law

How To Avoid The Constraints Of Rule 10b-5(B): A First Circuit Guide For Underwriters, 43 J. Marshall L. Rev. 931 (2010), Eric H. Franklin

UIC Law Review

No abstract provided.


Freeze-Outs: Transcontinental Analysis And Reform Proposals, Marco Ventoruzzo 2010 Penn State Law

Freeze-Outs: Transcontinental Analysis And Reform Proposals, Marco Ventoruzzo

Journal Articles

One of the most crucial, but systematically neglected, comparative differences between corporate law systems in Europe and in the United States concerns the regulations governing freeze-out transactions in listed corporations. Freeze-outs can be defined as transactions in which the controlling shareholder exercises a legal right to buy out the shares of the minority, and consequently delists the corporation and brings it private. Beyond this essential definition, the systems diverge profoundly. This gap exists despite the fact that minority freeze-outs are one of the most debated issues in corporate law, in the public media, in a vast body of scholarly work …


Virtual Shareholder Meetings Reconsidered, Lisa Fairfax 2010 University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School

Virtual Shareholder Meetings Reconsidered, Lisa Fairfax

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Carey Law

In 2000 Delaware enacted a statute enabling corporations to host meetings solely by electronic means of communication rather than in a physical location. Since that time, several states have followed Delaware's lead, and the American Bar Association has proposed changing the Model Business Corporation Act to provide for some form of virtual shareholder meetings. Many states believed that such meetings would prove to be an important device for shareholders who desire to increase their voice within the corporation. Instead, very few companies have taken advantage of the ability to host such meetings. This Article provides some data on state statutes …


The Role Of Corporate Law In Preventing A Financial Crisis: Reflections On In Re Citigroup Inc. Shareholder Derivative Litigation, Franklin A. Gevurtz 2010 Pacific McGeorge School of Law

The Role Of Corporate Law In Preventing A Financial Crisis: Reflections On In Re Citigroup Inc. Shareholder Derivative Litigation, Franklin A. Gevurtz

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Corporate Governance Ii – Accountability Rules, Franklin A. Gevurtz 2010 Pacific McGeorge School of Law

Corporate Governance Ii – Accountability Rules, Franklin A. Gevurtz

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Excessive Executive Compensation: Prior Federal Attempts To Curb Perceived Abuses, 10 Hous. Bus. & Tax L.J. 196 (2010), Kathryn J. Kennedy 2010 John Marshall Law School

Excessive Executive Compensation: Prior Federal Attempts To Curb Perceived Abuses, 10 Hous. Bus. & Tax L.J. 196 (2010), Kathryn J. Kennedy

UIC Law Open Access Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Law Without Order In Chinese Corporate Governance Institutions, Donald C. Clarke 2010 Northwestern Pritzker School of Law

Law Without Order In Chinese Corporate Governance Institutions, Donald C. Clarke

Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business

The substantive norms of Chinese corporate governance have been studied extensively inside and outside China. Yet much less attention has been paid to the Chinese institutional environment that determines whether and how far those norms will be made meaningful. While complaints about general lack of enforcement are common, less common are analyses that concretely tie institutional capacity to specific enforcement problems. This Article aims to fill that gap. It surveys a number of state and non-state channels for the enforcement of corporate governance rules and standards in China, from markets to regulatory bodies, looking at the specific capacities of each. …


Reimagining Human Rights Law: Toward Global Regulation Of Transnational Corporations, Rachel J. Anderson 2010 University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

Reimagining Human Rights Law: Toward Global Regulation Of Transnational Corporations, Rachel J. Anderson

Scholarly Works

This article takes a new look at a perennial question of human rights: how to prevent corporate-related human rights abuses and provide remedies for victims. It argues that transnational corporations require specialized and targeted regulations and laws, and that the conflation of human rights law and international human rights law should be reversed to allow the advancement of other forms of human rights law. It makes two proposals. First, reimagine human rights law and international human rights law as separate categories. Specifically, classify international human rights law as a sub-category of human rights law. This distinction highlights the need to …


Commentary: The Federalization Of Nonprofit Regulation And Its Discontents, James J. Fishman 2010 Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University

Commentary: The Federalization Of Nonprofit Regulation And Its Discontents, James J. Fishman

Elisabeth Haub School of Law Faculty Publications

The Internal Revenue Service, at the instigation of the Senate Finance committee-the Service's primary congressional overseer-has commenced a corporate governance initiative by issuing announcements and guidelines, as well as providing educational advice as to how charities' internal affairs should be ordered. The Service also has revised the Form 990 Annual Information Return, a publicly available document, so that it contains mandatory corporate governance questions.2 Nonprofit organizations traditionally have been creatures of state law and overseen by state agencies and regulators.3 What is unique about the corporate governance initiative is the Service's admission that it lacks express statutory authority for this …


The Plight Of The Derivative Plaintiff: Justice Carter’S Dissent In Hogan V. Ingold, Michele Benedetto Neitz 2010 Golden Gate University School of Law

The Plight Of The Derivative Plaintiff: Justice Carter’S Dissent In Hogan V. Ingold, Michele Benedetto Neitz

Publications

Written over fifty years ago, Justice Carter’s Hogan dissent championed the rights of individuals with corporate investments to sue dishonest corporate officials through derivative lawsuits. His emphasis on justice and fairness for shareholders established Justice Carter as a visionary in the area of corporate ethics. Unfortunately, as the scandals of the modern era have demonstrated, many of Justice Carter’s concerns for shareholders remain justified.


Freezing Out Ben & Jerry: Corporate Law And The Sale Of A Social Enterprise Icon, Antony Page, Robert A. Katz 2010 Florida International University College of Law

Freezing Out Ben & Jerry: Corporate Law And The Sale Of A Social Enterprise Icon, Antony Page, Robert A. Katz

Faculty Publications

Companies with social missions are frequently bought by larger, more conventional profit-seeking firms and just as frequently accused of “selling out.” Ben & Jerry’s Homemade Inc. is perhaps the leading example: its takeover by international conglomerate Unilever is an oft-repeated cautionary tale of the negative proclivities of the publicly-traded corporate form and profit-maximizing corporate law. Contrary to conventional wisdom, however, corporate law did not compel the sale, or sell-out, of Ben & Jerry’s. This familiar account omits a critical part of the narrative -- the company and its founders had established impressive anti-takeover defenses that, when pressed, the board declined …


Shareholder Ownership And Primacy, Julian Velasco 2010 Notre Dame Law School

Shareholder Ownership And Primacy, Julian Velasco

Journal Articles

According to the traditional view, the shareholders own the corporation. Until relatively recently, this view enjoyed general acceptance. Today, however, there seems to be substantial agreement among legal scholars and others in the academy that shareholders do not own corporations. In fact, the claim that shareholders do own corporations often is dismissed as merely a “theory,” a “naked assertion,” or even a “myth.” And yet, outside of the academy, views on the corporation remain quite traditional. Most people - not just the public and the media, but also politicians, and even bureaucrats and the courts - seem to believe that …


Revisiting Berle And Rethinking The Corporate Structure, Kelli A. Alces 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Revisiting Berle And Rethinking The Corporate Structure, Kelli A. Alces

Seattle University Law Review

Adolf Berle and Gardiner Means painted what remains a defining portrait of corporate law. The separation of ownership and control they described and the agency costs it causes are still a central concern of the law of corporate governance. For that reason, Berle’s work is relevant nearly eighty years after its publication. Seemingly forgotten, however, is that Berle’s enduring description of the corporate structure was published before most of today’s corporate law was in place. His work preceded the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and even preceded the dominance of Delaware common law in …


Berle’S Vision Beyond Shareholder Interests: Why Investment Bankers Should Have (Some) Personal Liability, Claire Hill, Richard Painter 2010 Seattle University School of Law

Berle’S Vision Beyond Shareholder Interests: Why Investment Bankers Should Have (Some) Personal Liability, Claire Hill, Richard Painter

Seattle University Law Review

This essay, published in a symposium on the work of Adolf Berle, approaches the Berle-Dodd debate from the perspective that corporate managers have responsibilities beyond pursuing the interests of shareholders. Stock based executive compensation, designed to align managers’ interests with those of shareholders, has, in the investment banking industry in particular, failed to avert, and may have caused, managers (in this case, bankers) to take excessive risks that in the present financial crisis inflicted great damage on creditors and on society as a whole. We describe here the broad outlines of a proposal that we will discuss in future publications …


An Arm's Length Solution To The Shareholder Loan Tax Puzzle, Wayne M. Gazur 2010 University of Colorado Law School

An Arm's Length Solution To The Shareholder Loan Tax Puzzle, Wayne M. Gazur

Publications

No abstract provided.


Business-Like: The Supreme Court's 2009-2010 Labor And Employment Decisions, Melissa Hart 2010 University of Colorado Law School

Business-Like: The Supreme Court's 2009-2010 Labor And Employment Decisions, Melissa Hart

Publications

The 2009-10 Term at the Supreme Court was a relatively quiet one for labor and employment law. While the Justices were in the news for decisions on corporate political donations and the Second Amendment, the Court’s work-related docket grabbed no headlines. In fact, though, the Court considered 7 work law cases this Term, in areas ranging from standards for arbitration agreements to employee privacy rights in new technology to time limitations for filing Title VII disparate impact claims. This article discusses the Court’s labor and employment cases for the Term. While they may not have made much news, several of …


State Responsibility In Promoting Environmental Corporate Accountability, Lakshman Guruswamy 2010 University of Colorado Law School

State Responsibility In Promoting Environmental Corporate Accountability, Lakshman Guruswamy

Publications

No abstract provided.


A Standard Clause Analysis Of The Frustration Doctrine And The Material Adverse Change Clause, Andrew A. Schwartz 2010 University of Colorado at Boulder

A Standard Clause Analysis Of The Frustration Doctrine And The Material Adverse Change Clause, Andrew A. Schwartz

Publications

In the darkest depths of a corporate merger agreement lies the MAC clause, a term that permits the acquirer to walk away from a transaction if, between signing and closing, the target company experiences a "Material Adverse Change." Multibillion-dollar deals rise or fall based on the anticipated interpretation of a MAC clause, and invocation of the clause in a sensitive transaction could trigger the collapse of the global financial system. In short, the MAC clause is the most important contract term of our time. And yet--due to an almost total lack of case law--no one knows what it means.

In …


Trusts Versus Corporations: An Empirical Analysis Of Competing Organizational Forms, A. Joseph Warburton 2010 Syracuse University

Trusts Versus Corporations: An Empirical Analysis Of Competing Organizational Forms, A. Joseph Warburton

College of Law - Faculty Scholarship

This paper studies the effects of organizational form on managerial behavior and firm performance, from an empirical perspective. Managers of trusts are subject to stricter fiduciary responsibilities than managers of corporations. This paper examines the ramifications empirically, by exploiting data generated by a change in British regulations in the 1990s that allowed mutual funds to organize as either a trust or a corporation. I find evidence that trust law is effective in curtailing opportunistic behavior, as trust managers charge significantly lower fees than their observationally equivalent corporate counterparts. Trust managers also incur lower risk. However, evidence suggests that trust managers …


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