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Center for Urban Studies Publications and Reports

Oregon Department of Transportation

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Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies and Planning

Locating Truck Data Collection Sites In Oregon Using Representation Optimal Sampling, Kenneth Dueker, William A. Rabiega, Bruce Rex May 2016

Locating Truck Data Collection Sites In Oregon Using Representation Optimal Sampling, Kenneth Dueker, William A. Rabiega, Bruce Rex

Center for Urban Studies Publications and Reports

The Oregon Department of Transportation collects data on the performance of the highway system by sampling traffic volume, vehicle classification, truck weights, pavement conditions, etc. The selection of efficient and accurate locations for collecting data is important. This report addresses the larger sampling problem by focusing on locations for collecting truck weight data. Sites selected for weight-in-motion/automatic vehicle identification (WIM/AVI) within the Crescent/HELP project are assessed to determine their locational suitability for truck weight data collection. A method, Representation Optimal Sampling (ROS), to aid in site selection is reported here. Sampling configurations of six and twelve station ...


The Oregon Dot Slow-Speed Weigh-In--Motion (Swim) Project: Final Report, James G. Strathman Sep 1998

The Oregon Dot Slow-Speed Weigh-In--Motion (Swim) Project: Final Report, James G. Strathman

Center for Urban Studies Publications and Reports

Weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems have provided an effective means of data collection for pavement research and facility design, traffic monitoring, and weight enforcement for over 40 years. In weight enforcement, WIM systems have been increasingly used to screen potentially overweight vehicles. Vehicles that exceed weight limits as measured on a WIM scale are then weighed on a static scale, which is subject to accuracy standards specified by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (1998). The use of WIM for screening purposes reduces queuing at weigh stations, resulting in considerable savings for both truckers and enforcement agencies. To date, however, WIM ...


Oregon Dot Slow-Speed Weigh-In-Motion (Swim) Project: Analysis Of Initial Weight Data, Tim Swope, James G. Strathman Jul 1997

Oregon Dot Slow-Speed Weigh-In-Motion (Swim) Project: Analysis Of Initial Weight Data, Tim Swope, James G. Strathman

Center for Urban Studies Publications and Reports

This report presents the results of a preliminary analysis of axle weights from the Oregon DOT Slow-Speed Weigh in Motion (SWIM) scale at the Wyeth weigh station.* This report includes an analysis of methodology and variables used in the study; estimates of accuracy and precision of the WIM readings; and a regression analysis of the WIM and static scale weighings. Axles weights were collected from the traffic stream.


Traffic Data Selection: An Evaluation Of Siting Criteria For Permanent Traffic Recorders, Richard Ledbetter, Kenneth Dueker, Milan Krukar, Vern Tabery Jan 1991

Traffic Data Selection: An Evaluation Of Siting Criteria For Permanent Traffic Recorders, Richard Ledbetter, Kenneth Dueker, Milan Krukar, Vern Tabery

Center for Urban Studies Publications and Reports

Traffic volume data are needed for design and construction zone traffic management. In addition, continuous traffic volume data (collected by automatic traffic recorders) is needed to factor short counts (24 hours or more) collected at key sites on the states highway network.

This study evaluates the procedures used by the Oregon Department of Transportation for collecting continuous traffic volume data to determine: (1) if the current location and number of automatic traffic recorders (ATRs) on Oregon's highway network is adequate for estimating monthly seasonal factors, and (2) if the current procedure of using group means, based on geographical regions ...