Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Urban Studies and Planning Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 30 of 45

Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies and Planning

Space For Adapting: Reconciling Adaptation And Mitigation In Local Climate Change Plans, Elisabeth Hamin, Nicole Gurran May 2012

Space For Adapting: Reconciling Adaptation And Mitigation In Local Climate Change Plans, Elisabeth Hamin, Nicole Gurran

Elisabeth M. Hamin

Amid the complexity of actually planning for adaptation and mitigation in cities, spatial form matters. Denser urban environments generally have lower per capita emissions because they enable transit and more efficient heating. At the same time, a larger green infrastructure can be beneficial to adaptation, as it provides room for urban greening, storm and flood water management, and treatment of other ill-effects of climate change. City plans need to reconcile both goals to be fully climate resilient, but to date, there has not been an empirical evaluation on whether the adaptation policies cities are choosing create conflict with mitigative goals ...


Windows Of Opportunity: Addressing Climate Uncertainty Through Adaptation Plan Implementation, Elisabeth Hamin, Yaser Abunnasr, Elizabeth Brabec Jan 2012

Windows Of Opportunity: Addressing Climate Uncertainty Through Adaptation Plan Implementation, Elisabeth Hamin, Yaser Abunnasr, Elizabeth Brabec

Elisabeth M. Hamin

There is a pressing need for municipalities and regions to undertake adaptation planning that will create urban systems suited to current as well as future climates, but uptake of adaptation has been slow. This is particularly unfortunate in that patterns of urban built form interact with climate change in ways that can reduce, or intensify, the impacts of overall global change. For policy-makers, uncertainty regarding the timing and magnitude of climate change is a significant barrier to implementing adaptation planning. Resiliency theory suggests an approach to evaluating adaptation options for cities that can bring these factors together. The method we ...


Regional Conservation Partnerships In New England, Elisabeth Hamin Jan 2012

Regional Conservation Partnerships In New England, Elisabeth Hamin

Elisabeth M. Hamin

Across New England, a new model of regional collaboration is increasingly being used by land conservation trusts, watershed associations, state agencies and others. Regional conservation partnerships (RCPs) serve multiple purposes, such as coordinating among the various active groups in the region and allowing them to leverage funding and staff capacity. However, their essential missions are the same—protect more land from development. We use interviews, geographic information systems (GIS), and statistical analysis on 20 case studies to document RCP growth and characteristics and to analyze which attributes most contribute to their ability to conserve land. Along with well-known factors of ...


The Green Infrastructure Transect: An Organizational Framework For Mainstreaming Adaptation Planning Policies, Yaser Abunnasr, Elisabeth Hamin Jan 2012

The Green Infrastructure Transect: An Organizational Framework For Mainstreaming Adaptation Planning Policies, Yaser Abunnasr, Elisabeth Hamin

Elisabeth M. Hamin

When considering the range of spatial planning actions that cities can take to adapt to climate change, many of them fall under the conceptual umbrella of green infrastructure (GI). GI has been defined as the spatial planning of landscape systems at multiple scales and within varying contexts to provide open space, safeguard natural systems, protect agricultural lands, and ensure ecological integrity for cultural, social, and ecosystem benefits (Benedict andMcMahon, Renew Resour J 20:12–17, 2002, Green infrastructure: linking landscape and communities. Island Press,Washington, DC, 2006; Ahern, Cities of the future. IWA Publishing, London, 2008). While the traditional definition ...


Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Ryan T. Kemmerich, Christopher M. Johnson, Matthew J. Canty, Benjamin A. Green Mar 2011

Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Ryan T. Kemmerich, Christopher M. Johnson, Matthew J. Canty, Benjamin A. Green

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Studio and Student Research and Creative Activity

This is one of five reports submitted for the LA497C Spring 2011 Senior Studio project.

Hatfield is located on the Connecticut River with interstate 91 cutting through the center of the town. Hatfield has an abundance of wetlands and floodplains, and the town’s relatively old-fashioned culture. As a community they have worked together to buffer the town from some of the more excessive development pressures other Pioneer Valley towns have been facing in the last ten years. At the same time, the town’s fertile soil and agricultural industry, along with easy commute distances to many large regional employers ...


Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Anthony D. Brow, William C. Bunker, Nicholas J. Mastroianni, Wesley A. Lomax, Philip A. Morrison Jr Mar 2011

Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Anthony D. Brow, William C. Bunker, Nicholas J. Mastroianni, Wesley A. Lomax, Philip A. Morrison Jr

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Studio and Student Research and Creative Activity

This is one of five reports submitted for the LA497C Spring 2011 Senior Studio project.

The town of Hatfield needs a Master plan to keep the town up to date on zoning regulations amongst other topics. They need to preserve rural character and enhance its economic base without overstepping private property rights. The town needs to attract new business, provide housing opportunities for the elderly, and standards for clustered residential development that will help preserve open space. The residents in Hatfield are concerned with three specific areas.

1. Managing growth and economic development

2. Preserving agriculture, natural resources, open space ...


Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Jane K. Alexander, Nicholas A. Betts, Tanya M. Chesnell, Julie A. Goodwin, Sage W. Sluter Mar 2011

Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Jane K. Alexander, Nicholas A. Betts, Tanya M. Chesnell, Julie A. Goodwin, Sage W. Sluter

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Studio and Student Research and Creative Activity

This is one of five reports submitted for the LA497C Spring 2011 Senior Studio project.

Hatfield, Massachusetts is a small town within the Pioneer Valley. With the Connecticut River to the east, Hatfield is spanned with extremely rich agriculture near the river and mountains in West Hatfield. The town is split into two major areas, separated by both geographical features, and major transportation routes that head from the North to the South. Hatfield also is home to the Mill River, a waterway that is revered for its biodiversity. Founded in 1630, Hatfield was once settled by the Native Americans, and ...


Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Michael A. Brescia, Rachel L. Grigorian, Zachary M. Kingston, Carl M. Mccrae, James A. Rebello Mar 2011

Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Michael A. Brescia, Rachel L. Grigorian, Zachary M. Kingston, Carl M. Mccrae, James A. Rebello

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Studio and Student Research and Creative Activity

This is one of five reports submitted for the LA497C Spring 2011 Senior Studio project.

The purpose of this report is to show the results of a partnership between the Town of Hatfield Massachusetts, and the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning at the University of Massachusetts.

The Town of Hatfield initially approached the University for assistance in understanding the options available for Greenway development in Hatfield, while maintaining the charm and character the town is proud of.

In his ground-breaking book, Greenways for America, Author Charles Little (1990) provides a simple definition of a Greenway:

A greenway is ...


Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Matthew G. Bent, Henry A. Hess, Andre E. Belperron Mar 2011

Proposed Greenway Of Hatfield, Massachusetts - La497c - Senior Studio, Matthew G. Bent, Henry A. Hess, Andre E. Belperron

Landscape Architecture & Regional Planning Studio and Student Research and Creative Activity

This is one of five reports submitted for the LA497C Spring 2011 Senior Studio project.

This proposed greenway plan will be assessing the features of Hatfield such as, History, natural features, and open space within the town. After a thorough assessment of the towns features the report will cover the extensive proposed greenway plan, focusing mostly on the town center of Hatfield. The town center is the hub of the town where the major community buildings are such as the elementary and high schools, town hall, the town library, and most of the public recreation fields. Once the overall greenway ...


Local Actions, National Frameworks: A Dual-Scale Comparison Of Climate Adaptation Planning On Two Continents, Elisabeth Hamin, Nicole Gurran Jan 2011

Local Actions, National Frameworks: A Dual-Scale Comparison Of Climate Adaptation Planning On Two Continents, Elisabeth Hamin, Nicole Gurran

Elisabeth M. Hamin

This study explores emerging approaches to local climate change adaptation planning in the United States and Australia, and seeks to explain why some local authorities have begun to take action despite weak national and state level directives. We compare strategic documents from 13 local authorities across the two nations, representing the “first generation” of adaptation plans. Our focus is on potential explanations for early engagement in adaptation planning – size, location and risk level of the municipality, the existence of national or state mandates and access to supra local resources or support. We also explore the nature and type of adaptation-planning ...


Wildland–Urban Interface Communities’ Response To Post-Fire Salvage Logging, Elisabeth Hamin, Robert Ryan Jan 2009

Wildland–Urban Interface Communities’ Response To Post-Fire Salvage Logging, Elisabeth Hamin, Robert Ryan

Elisabeth M. Hamin

Salvage logging, the removal for profit of standing trees that have been damaged by extensive wildfires, has been quite controversial and subject to lawsuits that can delay the logging past the time in which the lumber is still useful. It has not been clear, however, whether the public that has been most affected by wildfires—those that live near burned areas—support or oppose postfire logging. In this research we use focus groups and stakeholder interviews in urban interface communities that have experienced significant wildfires to examine in some detail the perspectives these members of the public have regarding salvage ...


Urban Form And Climate Change: Balancing Adaptation And Mitigation In The U.S. And Australia, Elisabeth Hamin, Nicole Gurran Jan 2009

Urban Form And Climate Change: Balancing Adaptation And Mitigation In The U.S. And Australia, Elisabeth Hamin, Nicole Gurran

Elisabeth M. Hamin

The science of climate change is now well established. Predicted weather-related events like sea level rise, increased storm events, and extreme heat waves imply an urgent need for new approaches to settlement design to enable human and non-human species to adapt to these increased risks. A wide variety of policy responses are emerging at local and regional levels – from sustainable urban form, to alternative energy production and new approaches to biodiversity conservation. However, little attempt has been made to ensure that strategies to adapt to the inevitable impacts of enhanced climate change (such as additional open space to enable water ...


Wildfires, Communities, And Agencies: Stakeholders’ Perceptions Of Postfire Forest Restoration And Rehabilitation, Elisabeth Hamin, Robert Ryan Oct 2008

Wildfires, Communities, And Agencies: Stakeholders’ Perceptions Of Postfire Forest Restoration And Rehabilitation, Elisabeth Hamin, Robert Ryan

Elisabeth M. Hamin

After wildfire, land managers are often called on to undertake complex restoration activities while also managing relations with wildfire-devastated communities. This research investigates the community–US Forest Service agency relations in the postwildfire period in three western US communities. In each community, we interviewed key informant representatives from government, business, environmental organizations, and recreation groups and conducted focus groups to gather input from residents located near burn areas. The goal was to understand how forest restoration and rehabilitation efforts and agency outreach were perceived by stakeholders who were recently affected by wildfire and how these perceptions were related to underlying ...


Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix A Community Socio-Economic Profile, Center For Economic Development Jan 2002

Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix A Community Socio-Economic Profile, Center For Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This is Appendix A of the Town of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan. This Appendix contains a Community Socio-Economic Profile.


Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix C Community Survey Results, Center For Economic Development Jan 2002

Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix C Community Survey Results, Center For Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This is Appendix C of the Town of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan. This Appendix contains a summarized report of the results of a community survey.


Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan, Center For Economic Development Jan 2002

Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan, Center For Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

Billerica is a community rich in history and burgeoning with change. We come from colonial, agrarian roots, participated in the industrial revolution and enjoyed our day as a vacation destination. Billerica changed as the post war economy changed and became a haven for those, many from the city, seeking a close-knit community to raise families. We are now at the forefront of a high technology economy that has brought with it jobs, hotels and more change. As a community we struggle with our desire to preserve our historical character as a rural community and our realization that economic development is ...


Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix B Community Charrette Results, Center For Economic Development Jan 2002

Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix B Community Charrette Results, Center For Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This is Appendix B of the Town of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan. This Appendix contains the results of a Community Charrette in Billerica, Massachusetts that helped identify the desires of residents in the community.


Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix D, Center For Economic Development Jan 2002

Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix D, Center For Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This is an appendix for the Town of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan. This Appendix contains a community buildout analysis for Billerica.


Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix E, Center For Economic Development Jan 2002

Town Of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan Appendix E, Center For Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This is an Appendix for the Town of Billerica, Massachusetts Master Plan. This Appendix contains an open space and recreation plan for the Town of Billerica.


Economic Development And Planning Report, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 2001

Economic Development And Planning Report, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This report identifies the planning and economic development needs of the tristate region between the Blackstone River Valley and Quinebaug-Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage Corridors in Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.


Erving Usher Plant Revitalization, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 2000

Erving Usher Plant Revitalization, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

The purpose of this report was to make a plan to revitalize the Usher Plant in Erving, Massachusetts. The potential uses for the space are secondary to the question of structural integrity and extent of environmental contamination. The report raises these issues and gives some recommendations on how to proceed towards a resolution.


Moving Toward The Millennium With Open Space In Huntington, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Moving Toward The Millennium With Open Space In Huntington, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This report includes presentation and examination of community, environmental and conservation/recreation issues. The information is then analyzed according to the needs of the town and incorporated into recommendations for future action.


Laying The Groundwork: Preparing For A Master Plan In Deerfield, Ma, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Laying The Groundwork: Preparing For A Master Plan In Deerfield, Ma, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

In April of 1998 a Master Plan Committee was established to start work toward the first Master Plan for Deerfield, Massachusetts. A major catalyst for this decision was chronic septic failure throughout much of Deerfield. This failure raised the question of whether or not Deerfield should expand its public sewer. Expanding the system would solve the immediate problem of septic failure, but could potentially encourage unwanted development and create a new cycle of problems.


Town Of Boxford, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Town Of Boxford, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This report explores the town of Boxford, Massachusetts. Boxford is a unique rural community in the Merrimack Valley and the Boston metropolitan area. It has no traffic lights, sidewalks or signs, and very few streetlights, or commercial or industrial activity. Because of its 50-year old 2-acre zoning and close proximity to Boston, which contribute to its high housing costs, this community is out of reach for most Massachusetts residents.


Town Of Georgetown, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Town Of Georgetown, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This report focuses on the town of Georgetown, Massachusetts. While it was still widely forested, with many acres of open and recreation land, the town also had a walkable village core as well as industrial and commercial development. The town was renowned for its thriving antique industry and also boasted an organ manufacturing company, a supermarket and an expanding public golf and country club.


Town Of Haverhill, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Town Of Haverhill, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This report focuses on the town of Haverhill, Massachusetts. The town was settled in 1650, with a population of 52,000. Haverhill has maintained the characteristics of hometowns found throughout New England. The town has an established restaurant district and a proliferation of specialty shops that are all within walking distance of each other, while surrounding neighborhoods reflect interesting architectural diversity.


Town Of Lawrence, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Town Of Lawrence, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This report takes a look at the town of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Lawrence, originally a rural farming town, was transformed into a major industrial center when Boston Entrepreneurs developed huge textile mills on the Merrimack River to use the power of its water falls. The mill owners built canals, a dam and reservoir, boarding houses and a machine shop for locomotives, creating one of the first industrial complexes in the country.


Town Of North Andover, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Town Of North Andover, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

North Andover, Massachusetts lies along the banks of the Merrimack River and is surrounded by the Towns of Methuen, Haverhill, Boxford, Andover, Middleton, North Reading, and the City of Lawrence. The settlement of the town began in 1640 and was incorporated as Andover in 1646. North Andover is governed by an open Town Meeting form of government, a five-member Board of Selectmen and a Town Manager pursuant to a Home Rule Charter that went into effect in 1986.


Town Of Andover, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Town Of Andover, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

Andover is a suburban community of 32 square miles with a population of 29,000. The town is located just 20 miles south of Boston at the intersection of I-93 and I-495. With easy access to the city and Logan Airport, Andover is home to many of the largest high-technology firms such as Hewlett-Packard, Raytheon, Digital, Gillette, and Genetics Institute.


Town Of Groveland, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development Jan 1999

Town Of Groveland, Umass Amherst Center Economic Development

Center for Economic Development Technical Reports

This report takes a look at Groveland, Massachusetts. Groveland is a small residential community that retains all of the characteristics of a friendly rural town in the setting of a convenient suburb. The town was incorporated in 1850, and changed gradually from an agricultural community to one that is almost wholly residential.