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Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies and Planning

Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp Jan 2013

Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp

Faculty Publications, Anthropology

In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1vG542A, which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1vG542A was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1vG542A is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene ...


The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard Jan 2013

The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard

Faculty Publications, Anthropology

This study explores the interrelationship between the genus Canis and hunter–gatherers through a case study of prehistoric Native Americans in the San Francisco Bay-Sacramento Delta area. A distinctive aspect of the region's prehistoric record is the interment of canids, variously classified as coyotes, dogs, and wolves. Since these species are difficult to distinguish based solely on morphology, ancient DNA analysis was employed to distinguish species. The DNA study results, the first on canids from archaeological sites in California, are entirely represented by domesticated dogs (including both interments and disarticulated samples from midden deposits). These results, buttressed by stable ...


Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp Jan 2013

Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp

Faculty Publications, Urban and Regional Planning

In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1vG542A, which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1vG542A was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1vG542A is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene ...


The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard Jan 2013

The Role Of Canids In Ritual And Domestic Contexts: New Ancient Dna Insights From Complex Hunter-Gatherer Sites In Prehistoric Central California, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian F. Byrd, Anna Cornellas, Jelmer W. Eerkens, Jeffrey Rosenthal, Tim R. Carpenter, Jennifer A. Leonard

Alan M. Leventhal

This study explores the interrelationship between the genus Canis and hunter–gatherers through a case study of prehistoric Native Americans in the San Francisco Bay-Sacramento Delta area. A distinctive aspect of the region's prehistoric record is the interment of canids, variously classified as coyotes, dogs, and wolves. Since these species are difficult to distinguish based solely on morphology, ancient DNA analysis was employed to distinguish species. The DNA study results, the first on canids from archaeological sites in California, are entirely represented by domesticated dogs (including both interments and disarticulated samples from midden deposits). These results, buttressed by stable ...


Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp Jan 2013

Brief Communication: Evolution Of A Specific O Allele (O1vg542a) Supports Unique Ancestry Of Native Americans, Fernando A. Villanea, Deborah A. Bolnick, Cara Monroe, Rosita Worl, Rosemary Cambra, Alan M. Leventhal, Brian M. Kemp

Alan M. Leventhal

In this study, we explore the geographic and temporal distribution of a unique variant of the O blood group allele called O1vG542A, which has been shown to be shared among Native Americans but is rare in other populations. O1vG542A was previously reported in Native American populations in Mesoamerica and South America, and has been proposed as an ancestry informative marker. We investigated whether this allele is also found in the Tlingit and Haida, two contemporary indigenous populations from Alaska, and a pre-Columbian population from California. If O1vG542A is present in Na-Dene speakers (i.e., Tlingits), it would indicate that Na-Dene ...


Mothers And Infants In The Prehistoric Santa Clara Valley: What Stable Isotopes Tell Us About Ancestral Ohlone Weaning Practices, Alan M. Leventhal, Karen S. Gardner, Rosemary Cambra, Eric J. Bartelink, Antoinette Martinez Jan 2011

Mothers And Infants In The Prehistoric Santa Clara Valley: What Stable Isotopes Tell Us About Ancestral Ohlone Weaning Practices, Alan M. Leventhal, Karen S. Gardner, Rosemary Cambra, Eric J. Bartelink, Antoinette Martinez

Faculty Publications, Anthropology

Breast-feeding and weaning are a part of childhood in all human populations, but the exact timing of these milestones varies between groups. As infants incorporate the nutrients from breast milk into their growing bones, chemical evidence is captured in the form of higher stable nitrogen (δ15N) isotope values. This study interprets δ15N values in the bone collagen of children (n = 24) buried at the Yukisma Mound (CA-SCL-38), in Santa Clara County, California. Radiocarbon dates for this site span 2200-250 B.P., but primarily fall during the Late period (740-230 B.P.). In the one probable mother-infant pair available for study ...


Mothers And Infants In The Prehistoric Santa Clara Valley: What Stable Isotopes Tell Us About Ancestral Ohlone Weaning Practices, Alan M. Leventhal, Karen S. Gardner, Rosemary Cambra, Eric J. Bartelink, Antoinette Martinez Jan 2011

Mothers And Infants In The Prehistoric Santa Clara Valley: What Stable Isotopes Tell Us About Ancestral Ohlone Weaning Practices, Alan M. Leventhal, Karen S. Gardner, Rosemary Cambra, Eric J. Bartelink, Antoinette Martinez

Alan M. Leventhal

Breast-feeding and weaning are a part of childhood in all human populations, but the exact timing of these milestones varies between groups. As infants incorporate the nutrients from breast milk into their growing bones, chemical evidence is captured in the form of higher stable nitrogen (δ15N) isotope values. This study interprets δ15N values in the bone collagen of children (n = 24) buried at the Yukisma Mound (CA-SCL-38), in Santa Clara County, California. Radiocarbon dates for this site span 2200-250 B.P., but primarily fall during the Late period (740-230 B.P.). In the one probable mother-infant pair available for study ...


Paleoepidemiological Patterns Of Interpersonal Aggression In A Prehistoric Central California Population From Ca-Ala-329, Alan M. Leventhal, Robert Jurmain, Eric Bartelink, Viviana Bellifemine, Irina Nechayev, Melinda Atwood, Diane Digiuseppe Aug 2009

Paleoepidemiological Patterns Of Interpersonal Aggression In A Prehistoric Central California Population From Ca-Ala-329, Alan M. Leventhal, Robert Jurmain, Eric Bartelink, Viviana Bellifemine, Irina Nechayev, Melinda Atwood, Diane Digiuseppe

Faculty Publications, Anthropology

Interpersonal aggression is assessed paleoepidemiologically in a large skeletal population from the CA-ALA-329 site located on the southeastern side of San Francisco Bay, California. This comprehensive analysis included all currently recognized skeletal criteria, including craniofacial fracture, projectile injury, forearm fracture, and perimortem bone modification. Craniofacial injury is moderately common, showing an adult prevalence of 9.0% with facial lesions accounting for >50% of involvement. Clinical studies suggest that such separate evaluation of facial involvement provides a useful perspective for understanding patterns of interpersonal aggression. In this group male facial involvement is significantly greater than in females, paralleling the pattern found ...


Paleoepidemiological Patterns Of Interpersonal Aggression In A Prehistoric Central California Population From Ca-Ala-329, Alan M. Leventhal, Robert Jurmain, Eric Bartelink, Viviana Bellifemine, Irina Nechayev, Melinda Atwood, Diane Digiuseppe Aug 2009

Paleoepidemiological Patterns Of Interpersonal Aggression In A Prehistoric Central California Population From Ca-Ala-329, Alan M. Leventhal, Robert Jurmain, Eric Bartelink, Viviana Bellifemine, Irina Nechayev, Melinda Atwood, Diane Digiuseppe

Alan M. Leventhal

Interpersonal aggression is assessed paleoepidemiologically in a large skeletal population from the CA-ALA-329 site located on the southeastern side of San Francisco Bay, California. This comprehensive analysis included all currently recognized skeletal criteria, including craniofacial fracture, projectile injury, forearm fracture, and perimortem bone modification. Craniofacial injury is moderately common, showing an adult prevalence of 9.0% with facial lesions accounting for >50% of involvement. Clinical studies suggest that such separate evaluation of facial involvement provides a useful perspective for understanding patterns of interpersonal aggression. In this group male facial involvement is significantly greater than in females, paralleling the pattern found ...