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Portland State University

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

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Articles 151 - 179 of 179

Full-Text Articles in Urban Studies and Planning

Planning A Sustainable Portland: A Digital Library For Local, Regional, And State Planning And Policy Documents, Carl Abbott Jan 2005

Planning A Sustainable Portland: A Digital Library For Local, Regional, And State Planning And Policy Documents, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

This paper is intended as a guiding framework for the collection and digitizing program of the Oregon Sustainable Community Digital Library (OSCDL). The document addresses the following issues: (1) Portland and Oregon as centers of innovative planning (2) The institutional context of planning (3) The types of planning documentation typically found (4) The definition and dimensions of sustainability (5) Issue areas and topics that are most significant and interesting for electronic access.

It then offers suggestions about priorities for digital archiving based on a historical interpretation of Portland’s key planning and policy accomplishments and its consequent planning "gems" that ...


Incorporating Science Into The Environmental Policy Process: A Case Study From Washington State, Tessa B. Francis, Kara A. Whittaker, Vivek Shandas, April V. Mills, Jessica K. Graybill Jan 2005

Incorporating Science Into The Environmental Policy Process: A Case Study From Washington State, Tessa B. Francis, Kara A. Whittaker, Vivek Shandas, April V. Mills, Jessica K. Graybill

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

The incorporation of science into environmental policy is a key concern at many levels of decision making. Various institutions have sought to standardize the protection of natural resources by requiring that decisions be made based on the "best available science." Here we present empirical data describing the incorporation of best available science in the land-use policy process on a local scale. Results are based on interviews with planners and others who conducted scientific reviews associated with a Washington State Growth Management Act amendment that requires the inclusion of best available science in protecting critical areas. Our results show that jurisdictions ...


Helping Everyone Have Plenty: Addressing Distribution And Circulation In An Hours-Based Local Currency System, Jonathan Lepofsky, Lisa K. Bates Jan 2005

Helping Everyone Have Plenty: Addressing Distribution And Circulation In An Hours-Based Local Currency System, Jonathan Lepofsky, Lisa K. Bates

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

This paper summarizes research conducted by the authors who served as the ad-hoc Disbursement Task Force created by NCPlenty, Inc., the non-profit managing agency for a local currency system in central North Carolina, USA. NCPlenty, Inc. began printing a scrip-based local currency called the PLENTY in October 2002. The PLENTY, or Piedmont Local EcoNomy Tender, is based on the Ithaca HOURS currency and has faced circulation and distribution issues similar to other HOURS-based systems in the US. While at the start of the PLENTY’s first year of circulation the number of participating individuals and businesses nearly doubled and a ...


First Annual Portland Metropolitan Region Transportation System Performance Report, Brian Gregor, Sonoko Endo, Christopher Michael Monsere, Jennifer Dill, Jacob Baglien Sep 2004

First Annual Portland Metropolitan Region Transportation System Performance Report, Brian Gregor, Sonoko Endo, Christopher Michael Monsere, Jennifer Dill, Jacob Baglien

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Our transportation system is a key ingredient in the economy, quality of life and urban fabric of the Portland metropolitan area. It has been stated in the past that it is not possible to manage our transportation system tomorrow unless we understand how it is performing today. In this spirit, the Portland State University Center for Transportation Studies has been working with regional and statewide partners to develop new capabilities to measure, monitor and track the performance of the transportation system in real time and using archived data sources. We believe that it is possible to leverage these disparate data ...


Impacts And Issues Related To Proposed Changes In Oregon's Interstate Speed Limits, Final Report, Christopher Michael Monsere, Craig D. Newgard, Jennifer Dill, Anthony M. Rufolo, Elizabeth Wemple, Robert L. Bertini, Craig Milliken Sep 2004

Impacts And Issues Related To Proposed Changes In Oregon's Interstate Speed Limits, Final Report, Christopher Michael Monsere, Craig D. Newgard, Jennifer Dill, Anthony M. Rufolo, Elizabeth Wemple, Robert L. Bertini, Craig Milliken

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

The 2003 Oregon Legislature enacted revisions to the statutes governing maximum speed limits on interstate highways in Oregon (House Bill 2661). The legislature authorized a maximum posted speed of 70 miles per hour (mph) for passenger vehicles and 65 mph for heavy commercial vehicles (trucks) on interstate highways. Current maximums are 65 mph for passenger cars and 55 mph for trucks. Subsequently, the Oregon Transportation Commission required a report documenting the expected impacts to a wide range of policy issues. This report presents the results of a comprehensive literature review, analysis of existing data, and expert interpretation of this information ...


Scrapping Old Cars, Jennifer Dill Apr 2004

Scrapping Old Cars, Jennifer Dill

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Examines the effectiveness of vehicle buy-back programs such as the Bay Area Quality Management District's vehicle buy-back program, the largest publicly-funded scrapping program in the country. Attempts to identify who participates in such programs, and what the effects of participation are on efforts to reduce the amount of pollution generated by older vehicles.


Falling Into History: The Imagined Wests Of Kim Stanley Robinson In The "Three Californias" And Mars Trilogies, Carl Abbott Apr 2003

Falling Into History: The Imagined Wests Of Kim Stanley Robinson In The "Three Californias" And Mars Trilogies, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Analyzes Kim Stanley Robinson's two science fiction trilogies, the "Three Californias" trilogy '(Wild Shore, Gold Coast,' and 'Pacific Edge),' published during 1984 - 1990, and the Mars trilogy '(Red Mars, Green Mars,' and 'Blue Mars),' published during 1993 - 1996, to show how they incorporate themes of the complexity and contingency involved in settlement of the frontier associated with the "new Western history" of the 1980's - 1990's. The Mars trilogy co-opts the American West's status as a place of resource development when Robinson narrates the conquest of nature through technology. The Orange County trilogy explores, inter alia, intentional ...


Metro’S Regional Land Information System: The Virtual Key To Portland’S Growth Management Success, Gerrit Knapp, Richard Bolen, Ethan Seltzer Jan 2003

Metro’S Regional Land Information System: The Virtual Key To Portland’S Growth Management Success, Gerrit Knapp, Richard Bolen, Ethan Seltzer

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Though metropolitan Portland, Oregon, has perhaps the best-known growth management program in the world, one of the most important elements of that system has been conspicuously overlooked: the regional land information system (RLIS). Since RLIS was developed in the late 1980s, it has played a critical role in the development of every significant plan, the evaluation of every key policy, and the formulation of every major development model. RLIS created conditions that enabled a sophisticated and now muchstudied approach to metropolitan growth management to emerge. In this paper, we discuss the development, use, and maintenance of RLIS, illustrating its importance ...


Portland: Civic Culture And Civic Opportunity, Carl Abbott Apr 2001

Portland: Civic Culture And Civic Opportunity, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

This article assesses late-20th- and early-21st-century Portland, Oregon's distinctiveness as a city that supports education, environmental quality, and civic pride. Rated highly in such indicators as libraries, parks, voter turnout, and newspaper readership, Portland has enjoyed its reputation for having a high degree of "social capital" and civic activism. On the other hand, the quality of life has come at the expense of urban growth, weak labor unions, and a loss of local businesses taken over by national corporations. Its success, however, rests on strong public support for the community and a sense of pragmatism rather than ideology.


California Vehicle License Fees: Incidence And Equity, Jennifer Dill, Todd Mitchel Goldman, Martin Wachs Dec 1999

California Vehicle License Fees: Incidence And Equity, Jennifer Dill, Todd Mitchel Goldman, Martin Wachs

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Most states tax the value of residents' motor vehicles. In recent political debates over the future of these levies, the relative effects of these taxes on different socioeconomic groups have been a prominent question. By linking data from the Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey with estimates of vehicle values from consumer vehicle pricing guides, the socioeconomic and demographic incidence of California's Vehicle License Fee is examined. After the effects of state and federal income tax deductions are taken into account, the fee is found to be as regressive as the state's sales tax.


The International City Hypothesis: An Approach To The Recent History Of U.S. Cities, Carl Abbott Jan 1997

The International City Hypothesis: An Approach To The Recent History Of U.S. Cities, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Differentiates between the concepts of world cities and international cities, asserting that study of international cities offers greater opportunities for research and analysis of major urban regions of the latter 20th century. The world city model emphasizes hierarchy and status based on influence and power. The international city model emphasizes numerous indicators that demonstrate a broader range of international connections, including foreign tourists, new immigration, sister-city affiliations, and multinational corporation offices. They may function as production centers, gateway cities, or transactional cities. At present, statistical data are thin, and the topic invites research by urban historians.


The Portland Region: Where City And Suburbs Talk To Each Other ... And Sometimes Agree, Carl Abbott Nov 1996

The Portland Region: Where City And Suburbs Talk To Each Other ... And Sometimes Agree, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Portland, OR, is often cited as an example of successful regional governance and planning. The metropolitan area appears to match many of the precepts of the popular "compact city" model of urban growth and to demonstrate the capacity of local and state government to shape growing metropolitan regions. Given this reputation, it is important to evaluate the relevance of the Portland experience for other communities, distinguishing unique local circumstances form generalizable characteristics. This analysis explores the spatial character of metropolitan Portland in the 1990s, summarizes the politics of regional planning, examines weaknesses in the Portland approach, and offers suggestions for ...


Thinking About Cities: The Central Tradition In U.S. Urban History, Carl Abbott Sep 1996

Thinking About Cities: The Central Tradition In U.S. Urban History, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Urban history in United States in the last 150 years has been concerned with two central questions. Historians of three generations focused on the process of urbanization and the problem of civic order in the cities. The historians of recent times emphasize on community formation as the determinant of economic growth and its general effect. Earlier scholars discussed the creation of communities and institutions and the correlation between urban and national development. Thus, interaction between city and citizen is a viable theme of urban history.


The Internationalization Of Washington, D.C., Carl Abbott May 1996

The Internationalization Of Washington, D.C., Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

The globalization of U.S. cities is attracting increasing theoretical and empirical attention. The author analyzes internationally oriented activities in metropolitan Washington, D.C., and demonstrates that the city's international roles are built directly on its historic function as a national city. Focusing on change over time, the author also shows that globalization is a stepwise process: Several key periods of the expansion of international functions were followed by periods of gradual absorption. In comparative context, Washington supports arguments about the separability of international functions and shows the importance of historical development in determining the different ways in which ...


"Beautiful Downtown Burbank" : Changing Metropolitan Geography In The Modern West, Carl Abbott Jul 1995

"Beautiful Downtown Burbank" : Changing Metropolitan Geography In The Modern West, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Focuses on the Western United States' leadership in city planning since World War II. Concepts of three competing ideas about the emerging form of decentralization or suburbanization; 'Urban realms'; 'Linear cities'; 'Go-board metropolis'; Opinion of historians and architectural experts; Illustration of several models for understanding the morphology of Western cities.


Planning The Oregon Way : A Twenty-Year Evaluation, Carl Abbott, Deborah A. Howe, Sy Adler Jan 1994

Planning The Oregon Way : A Twenty-Year Evaluation, Carl Abbott, Deborah A. Howe, Sy Adler

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Oregon's pioneering land use system is nationally recognized and serves as a valuable model and benchmark for other states. This volume examines the Oregon system, describes its strengths and weaknesses, and gives recommendations for the future.


Five Downtown Strategies: Policy Discourse And Downtown Planning Since 1945, Carl Abbott Jan 1993

Five Downtown Strategies: Policy Discourse And Downtown Planning Since 1945, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Downtown planning since World War II has been based on constantly changing assumptions about the nature of central business districts. From 1945 to 1955, downtown was seen as the city's unitary center, and the focus of planning activity was the improvement of downtown access and circulation. Between 1955 and 1965, downtown became a declining activity center and failing real estate market; planners and business groups fought decline and competition from the suburbs through programs like urban renewal. In the decade after 1965, a reaction against urban renewal led to a new conception of downtown as a set of distinct ...


The Evolution Of Federal Transit Policy, Sy Adler Jan 1993

The Evolution Of Federal Transit Policy, Sy Adler

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Examines how the US federal government came to subsidize a greater share of transit industry costs than most other national governments. Since World War II, downtown activists sought to boost their transit systems in the face of increasingly intense competition from suburban business centers; the transit systems of Los Angeles and San Francisco in particular were shaped by this competition. Downtown activists tried, with varying success, to influence the newly formed regional transit agencies and the Federal Department of Transportation, created in 1964. The federal government's role in urban transit has been characterized by a tension between economic rationalization ...


The Urban West And The Twenty-First Century, Carl Abbott Jan 1993

The Urban West And The Twenty-First Century, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

In 1964 Oregon novelist Ken Kesey published Sometimes a Great Notion, the impassioned story of a fiercely (even pathologically) independent family of loggers on the southern Oregon coast. The novel is much admired by Oregonians, who read it as a tribute to the vanishing American pioneer. The urban West appears only by implication in the form of a fumbling labor organizer who longs to return to the civilized cities of California. My argument is that what we see is what we're going to get. That is, the coming decades are likely to see the American West continue to work ...


The Politics Of Land-Use Law In Oregon: Senate Bill 100, Twenty Years After, Carl Abbott Jan 1993

The Politics Of Land-Use Law In Oregon: Senate Bill 100, Twenty Years After, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Describes the genesis of Oregon Senate Bill 100, 1973, and includes excerpts from a roundtable discussion by four men who were instrumental in creating the bill. The four men are Hector Macpherson, Ted Hallock, Stafford Hansel, and Henry Richmond. The bill called for an institutional structure for statewide land-use planning.


Regional City And Network City: Portland And Seattle In The Twentieth Century, Carl Abbott Aug 1992

Regional City And Network City: Portland And Seattle In The Twentieth Century, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Although Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, have comparable early histories, similar economic bases, and parallel demographic profiles, their responses to the rise of a global economy in the 20th century differ. Both were regional capitals in the first half of the century. Since then, however, Portland has kept its traditional role and has gained ground as a regional capital, while Seattle has become a network city transferring goods, services, and ideas reaching beyond the Pacific Northwest. [Western History Association best article award for 1993]


A History Of Metro, Carl Abbott, Margery Post Abbott May 1991

A History Of Metro, Carl Abbott, Margery Post Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

This document traces the evolution of Metro both as an idea and as an organization that serves an increasing range of public needs within the Portland metropolitan area. Several themes stand out as we look back at Metro's development and "family history."


International Cities In The Dual Systems Model: The Transformation Of Los Angeles And Washington, Carl Abbott Jan 1991

International Cities In The Dual Systems Model: The Transformation Of Los Angeles And Washington, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Though both Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., have grown into world cities since the 1940's, there are differences between them that are explained better by the two model system approach than by other approaches. Washington is distinctly and deliberately isolated from its immediate surroundings and is the center of an international information network. Los Angeles is the production and distribution center of an international region - Mexico and the United States. A valuable measure of the difference is the high proportion of professional workers in Washington, in contrast to the employment structure in Los Angeles, which closely reflects the ...


United States Regional History As An Instructional Field: The Practice Of College And University History Departments, Carl Abbott May 1990

United States Regional History As An Instructional Field: The Practice Of College And University History Departments, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

In one sense, American history is "a sequential process of regional development marked by a persistent tension between regional cultures and economic interests and integrative national institutions and values." Since the 1890's, regional history has been an active enterprise supported by academic instruction, leading university presses, specialized journals, and professional organizations. A survey of college and university departments of history yielded data to analyze the present ambiguous position of regional history within the evolving discipline of American historical studies.


Utopia And Bureaucracy: The Fall Of Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, Carl Abbott Feb 1990

Utopia And Bureaucracy: The Fall Of Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

During 1981-1985, the followers of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh built a large utopian community in eastern Oregon's solitude and named it Rajneeshpuram. While Rajneeshpuram appeared to be physically isolated and removed from government intervention, it was actually embedded in a dense system of laws and bureaucratic regulations, quite within reach of local, state, and national bureaucracies. It was this ability of the local and state regulators to limit the development that was one of the major factors for the sudden collapse of Rajneeshpuram in the fall of 1985. Other contributing factors were the growing disaffection and factionalism within the commune ...


Perspectives On Urban Economic Planning: The Case Of Washington, D.C., Since 1880, Carl Abbott Apr 1989

Perspectives On Urban Economic Planning: The Case Of Washington, D.C., Since 1880, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

There is little doubt that the United States has been undergoing a sweeping and multi-faceted economic transformation since the early 1970s. The industrial mix and spatial distribution of activities within the national economy are being altered by basic changes, including (1) the simultaneous growth of certain manufacturing industries and the decline of others, (2) the broad decentralization of manufacturing production to overseas locations and the rising importance of international trade, (3) the shift of employment from manufacturing and transportation into information processing activities, and (4) the emergence of historically peripheral regions in the South and West as centers of innovation ...


Infrastructure Politics: The Dynamics Of Crossing San Francisco Bay, Sy Adler Oct 1988

Infrastructure Politics: The Dynamics Of Crossing San Francisco Bay, Sy Adler

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Analyzes the efforts to deal with the San Francisco Bay Bridge controversy, 1945-59, to develop a theory of the politics of transport infrastructure projects by studying the influence of urban rivalry and the circumstances that allow political stalemates to be broken.


Greater Portland: Experiments With Professional Planning, 1905-1925, Carl Abbott Jan 1985

Greater Portland: Experiments With Professional Planning, 1905-1925, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Portland, Oregon grew so rapidly in population and wealth between 1905 and 1912 that the city's business leadership called for a systematic plan for future urban growth. The City Improvement League accepted the architectural recommendations of Edward H. Bennett to develop outward from the city's center through a series of government buildings, neighborhood parks, and parkways. Unfortunately, the local economic boom collapsed in 1912 and ended any chances of implementing Bennett's plan. Six years later, prosperity returned and a new architectural proposal by Charles Cheney gained acceptance, only to be subverted by the post-World War I economic ...


"To Arouse Interest In The Outdoors" : The Literary Career Of Enos Mills, Carl Abbott Jan 1981

"To Arouse Interest In The Outdoors" : The Literary Career Of Enos Mills, Carl Abbott

Urban Studies and Planning Faculty Publications and Presentations

Enos Mills (1870-1922), a self-taught natural historian, had four related careers: mountain guide in Estes Park, Colorado; innkeeper, promoting Colorado tourism; lobbyist and spokesman for national parks; writer of books and articles on the outdoors. Mills found his greatest success as a writer. The author discusses his writings in depth, the influence of John Muir, Mills's activity in creating Rocky Mountain National Park, and his pioneering work with the nature guide concept in the national parks. His writings and career influenced the development of American attitudes toward nature. Based on Mills's writings, secondary sources, contemporary newspapers, and the ...