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Full-Text Articles in Criminology

Cyber-Victimization And Delinquency: A General Strain Perspective, Ian D. Greenwood Jan 2016

Cyber-Victimization And Delinquency: A General Strain Perspective, Ian D. Greenwood

Graduate Student Theses, Dissertations, & Professional Papers

This study examines juvenile delinquency and cyber-victimization from a general strain perspective. General strain theory provides a model where strain is experienced through the (1) loss of something valued, (2) the presentation of noxious stimuli, or (3) the inability to achieve valued goals. As a coping mechanism for strain, some juveniles react through criminal or delinquent behavior. This thesis predicts that cyber-victimization increases the likelihood of physical fighting, weapon-carrying, and truancy at school. Using the 2013 National Crime Victimization Survey: School Crime Supplement, the hypotheses are analyzed using multivariate logistic regression models that include other known correlates of delinquency. Marginal ...


Factors Influencing Young Bystanders' Decisions To Intervene When Witnessing Cyber-Aggression: A Mixed Methods Exploration, Lisa Jodi Patterson Jan 2016

Factors Influencing Young Bystanders' Decisions To Intervene When Witnessing Cyber-Aggression: A Mixed Methods Exploration, Lisa Jodi Patterson

Theses: Doctorates and Masters

With the modern proliferation of computers, the Internet and smart phones, adolescents are at increased risk of cyber-aggression: negative, harmful behaviour expressed through electronic means and aimed at an individual (or group of individuals). Cyber-aggression can have serious consequences for the social, emotional and physical health of both targets and perpetrators. Some experts recommend tackling cyberaggression using the strategies applied to face-to-face forms of aggression and bullying in school environments. One such strategy is to encourage peer bystanders to intervene in a positive way, which has been demonstrated to influence both the duration and severity of bullying episodes in the ...


Youth Bullying: From Traditional Bullying Perpetration To Cyberbullying Perpetration And The Role Of Gender, Erica D. Sizemore Aug 2015

Youth Bullying: From Traditional Bullying Perpetration To Cyberbullying Perpetration And The Role Of Gender, Erica D. Sizemore

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

Youth bullying is a common form of youth violence; and recently, this behavior has diverged into two forms: traditional bullying and cyberbullying. Bullying has typically occurred within the context of school; however, with the aid of electronic devices and the Internet, youth are now able to bully beyond the schoolyard. Cyberbullying is a transmutation of traditional bullying earmarked by anonymity, a lack of guardianship, and physical distance. Using data from the 2009-2010 Health Behaviors of School-aged Children survey, this study examines the relationship between traditional bullying perpetration and cyberbullying perpetration. Logistic regression analyses suggest a relationship exist between the two ...


Cyber-Psychopathy: Examining The Relationship Between Dark E-Personality And Online Misconduct, Andrew D. Nevin Jul 2015

Cyber-Psychopathy: Examining The Relationship Between Dark E-Personality And Online Misconduct, Andrew D. Nevin

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Currently, there is a lack of research investigating how the unique structural conditions of cyberspace may influence the expression of ‘dark’ personality and the role of such e-personality in explaining instances of online misconduct. Using a theoretical framework of context-dependent personality, this study seeks to fill a gap in the literature by using self-report survey data to explore whether the internet may decrease, increase, or intensify the expression of psychopathy. Quantitative data analysis in this study shows that when controlling for social context, internet users exhibit higher levels of psychopathy online than offline, which is especially pronounced in male subsamples ...


Girls And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, P. Snell May 2015

Girls And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, P. Snell

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

No abstract provided.


Practical Ways To Reduce Online & In-School Bullying, Elizabeth Englander May 2015

Practical Ways To Reduce Online & In-School Bullying, Elizabeth Englander

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC) is an academic Center at Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts. By running a training program for graduate and undergraduate students in higher education, MARC offers free research, programs and services to K-12 schools in Massachusetts. Everyone benefits: future educators receive unique field training, and K-12 schools receive high-quality, no-cost programs and services. One important characteristic of MARC’s mission is to transmute significant research findings into concrete, useable information for K-12 teachers in the field. The sheer amount of information available today about bullying and cyberbullying can make any educator’s head spin. But ...


Spinning Our Wheels: Improving Our Ability To Respond To Bullying And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander May 2015

Spinning Our Wheels: Improving Our Ability To Respond To Bullying And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

Bullying is physical and or psychological abuse perpetuated by one powerful child upon another, with the intention to harm or dominate. Bullying and aggression in schools has reached epidemic proportions. Abusive bullying behaviors begin in elementary school, peak during middle school, and begin to subside in high school. Bullying behaviors are associated with catastrophic violence. Cyberbullying has emerged as one result of the increasingly online social life in which modern teens and children engage. Mediation may be inappropriate. The only safety mechanism that children will ultimately retain is the one between their ears.


Digital Self-Harm: Frequency, Type, Motivations, And Outcomes, Elizabeth Englander May 2015

Digital Self-Harm: Frequency, Type, Motivations, And Outcomes, Elizabeth Englander

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

This report describes research conducted in 2011 and 2012 on 617 subjects, 10% of whom reported self-cyberbullying. The report details the frequency of self-cyberbullying in boys versus girls (17% versus 8%) and the frequency of the incidents in questions. The data also reveals some of the characteristics of self‐cyberbullies, their motivations for digital self-harm and the relative success of the tactic.


Reducing Bullying And Cyberbullying: Ten Easy Tips For Educators Can Help Prevent Bullying In Schools And Online, Elizabeth Englander, Kristin Schank May 2015

Reducing Bullying And Cyberbullying: Ten Easy Tips For Educators Can Help Prevent Bullying In Schools And Online, Elizabeth Englander, Kristin Schank

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

No abstract provided.


Cyberbullying & Bullying In Massachusetts: Frequency & Motivations, Elizabeth Englander May 2015

Cyberbullying & Bullying In Massachusetts: Frequency & Motivations, Elizabeth Englander

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

This brief reports on the major findings of the studies conducted in the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center during the years 2006 to 2008. Detailed analyses are omitted but general findings are displayed and explained. The data deals primarily with cyberbullying, but some data related to bullying behaviors is reported. The findings are separated by study. Two studies are reported upon here: a survey of 334 college freshman and a survey of 178 K-12 educators from public schools across the Commonwealth. A third study, of 75 pediatricians in Massachusetts, will be discussed under separate cover. The findings from the two studies ...


Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying., Elizabeth K. Englander, Amy M. Muldowney May 2015

Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying., Elizabeth K. Englander, Amy M. Muldowney

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

The central role that the Internet now plays in the life of children has transformed everything about bullying between youth in the First World. Three features characterize cyberbullying: it evolves rapidly, adults differ fundamentally from children in their use of the Internet, and children are comfortable with technology but ignorant about the psychological impact of their online behaviors and the dangers to which they expose themselves and their families. This presentation will review the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center’s innovative and aggressive approach to researching and addressing both bullying and cyberbullying.


Marc Freshman Study 2011: Bullying, Cyberbullying, Risk Factors And Reporting, Elizabeth K. Englander May 2015

Marc Freshman Study 2011: Bullying, Cyberbullying, Risk Factors And Reporting, Elizabeth K. Englander

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

The Sample: 617 College freshman, studied over a 6 month period in 2010-­‐2011 Predominately white Predominately 18–19 years old Parents tend to be high working class, low middle class, or middle class Studied for: rates of behavior; risk factors & their relationship to bullying and cyberbullying; and many other social, family, and school factors


Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, Amy Muldowney May 2015

Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, Amy Muldowney

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

Cyberbullying is the newest form of an abusive pattern of behavior that has always existed among young people, and which has recently been increasing alarmingly in both frequency and severity. Efforts to identify and prevent cyberbullying have been studied and developed by the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC) and include working with parents, schools, and children.


Research Findings: Marc 2011 Survey Grades 3-12, Elizabeth K. Englander May 2015

Research Findings: Marc 2011 Survey Grades 3-12, Elizabeth K. Englander

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

Self-report survey of 20,766 children in grades 3-12 in Massachusetts


Marc Handful O' Statistics, Elizabeth K. Englander May 2015

Marc Handful O' Statistics, Elizabeth K. Englander

Elizabeth K Englander PhD

These statistics were gleaned from two 2010-­‐2011 studies through the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center at Bridgewater State University in Bridgewater, Massachusetts. In-depth survey of 617 college freshman Survey of 21,000 children in grades 3-12 in a variety of communities across Massachusetts.


Digital Self-Harm: Frequency, Type, Motivations, And Outcomes, Elizabeth Englander Jun 2012

Digital Self-Harm: Frequency, Type, Motivations, And Outcomes, Elizabeth Englander

MARC Research Reports

This report describes research conducted in 2011 and 2012 on 617 subjects, 10% of whom reported self-cyberbullying. The report details the frequency of self-cyberbullying in boys versus girls (17% versus 8%) and the frequency of the incidents in questions. The data also reveals some of the characteristics of self‐cyberbullies, their motivations for digital self-harm and the relative success of the tactic.


Spinning Our Wheels: Improving Our Ability To Respond To Bullying And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander Jan 2012

Spinning Our Wheels: Improving Our Ability To Respond To Bullying And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander

MARC Publications

Bullying is physical and or psychological abuse perpetuated by one powerful child upon another, with the intention to harm or dominate. Bullying and aggression in schools has reached epidemic proportions. Abusive bullying behaviors begin in elementary school, peak during middle school, and begin to subside in high school. Bullying behaviors are associated with catastrophic violence. Cyberbullying has emerged as one result of the increasingly online social life in which modern teens and children engage. Mediation may be inappropriate. The only safety mechanism that children will ultimately retain is the one between their ears.


Marc Handful O' Statistics, Elizabeth K. Englander Jan 2011

Marc Handful O' Statistics, Elizabeth K. Englander

MARC Research Reports

These statistics were gleaned from two 2010-­‐2011 studies through the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center at Bridgewater State University in Bridgewater, Massachusetts.

  • In-depth survey of 617 college freshman
  • Survey of 21,000 children in grades 3-12 in a variety of communities across Massachusetts.


Marc Freshman Study 2011: Bullying, Cyberbullying, Risk Factors And Reporting, Elizabeth K. Englander Jan 2011

Marc Freshman Study 2011: Bullying, Cyberbullying, Risk Factors And Reporting, Elizabeth K. Englander

MARC Research Reports

The Sample:

  • 617 College freshman, studied over a 6 month period in 2010-­‐2011
  • Predominately white
  • Predominately 18–19 years old
  • Parents tend to be high working class, low middle class, or middle class

Studied for: rates of behavior; risk factors & their relationship to bullying and cyberbullying; and many other social, family, and school factors


Research Findings: Marc 2011 Survey Grades 3-12, Elizabeth K. Englander Jan 2011

Research Findings: Marc 2011 Survey Grades 3-12, Elizabeth K. Englander

MARC Research Reports

Self-report survey of 20,766 children in grades 3-12 in Massachusetts


Practical Ways To Reduce Online & In-School Bullying, Elizabeth Englander Jan 2011

Practical Ways To Reduce Online & In-School Bullying, Elizabeth Englander

MARC Publications

The Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC) is an academic Center at Bridgewater State University in Massachusetts. By running a training program for graduate and undergraduate students in higher education, MARC offers free research, programs and services to K-12 schools in Massachusetts. Everyone benefits: future educators receive unique field training, and K-12 schools receive high-quality, no-cost programs and services. One important characteristic of MARC’s mission is to transmute significant research findings into concrete, useable information for K-12 teachers in the field. The sheer amount of information available today about bullying and cyberbullying can make any educator’s head spin. But ...


Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, Amy Muldowney Jun 2010

Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, Amy Muldowney

Bridgewater Review

Cyberbullying is the newest form of an abusive pattern of behavior that has always existed among young people, and which has recently been increasing alarmingly in both frequency and severity. Efforts to identify and prevent cyberbullying have been studied and developed by the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center (MARC) and include working with parents, schools, and children.


Girls And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, P. Snell Jan 2010

Girls And Cyberbullying, Elizabeth Englander, P. Snell

MARC Publications

No abstract provided.


Cyberbullying & Bullying In Massachusetts: Frequency & Motivations, Elizabeth Englander Jan 2008

Cyberbullying & Bullying In Massachusetts: Frequency & Motivations, Elizabeth Englander

MARC Publications

This brief reports on the major findings of the studies conducted in the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center during the years 2006 to 2008. Detailed analyses are omitted but general findings are displayed and explained. The data deals primarily with cyberbullying, but some data related to bullying behaviors is reported. The findings are separated by study. Two studies are reported upon here: a survey of 334 college freshman and a survey of 178 K-12 educators from public schools across the Commonwealth. A third study, of 75 pediatricians in Massachusetts, will be discussed under separate cover. The findings from the two studies ...


Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying., Elizabeth K. Englander, Amy M. Muldowney Oct 2007

Just Turn The Darn Thing Off: Understanding Cyberbullying., Elizabeth K. Englander, Amy M. Muldowney

MARC Publications

The central role that the Internet now plays in the life of children has transformed everything about bullying between youth in the First World. Three features characterize cyberbullying: it evolves rapidly, adults differ fundamentally from children in their use of the Internet, and children are comfortable with technology but ignorant about the psychological impact of their online behaviors and the dangers to which they expose themselves and their families. This presentation will review the Massachusetts Aggression Reduction Center’s innovative and aggressive approach to researching and addressing both bullying and cyberbullying.