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Social Work Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Pastors As Gatekeepers: Congregational Encounters With Mental Health And Substance Abuse Issues, Curtis Vanderwaal, Andrea Opei, Edwin I. Hernandez Apr 2015

Pastors As Gatekeepers: Congregational Encounters With Mental Health And Substance Abuse Issues, Curtis Vanderwaal, Andrea Opei, Edwin I. Hernandez

Faculty Publications

The vocation of a pastor is to care for the spiritual needs of a congregation and community. However, as many clergy know well, pastoral care is multifaceted and complex. For example, one of the hats that pastors frequently wear is that of pastoral counselor. Although pastors have traditionally offered support and pastoral care to congregants, they are beginning to spend more hours counseling both congregants and community members. One study indicated that pastors were spending time in pastoral counseling equivalent to that of marriage and family therapists in private practice.1 The same study showed that pastors are encountering persons ...


Clinical Social Work In A Digital Environment: Ethical And Risk-Management Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2015

Clinical Social Work In A Digital Environment: Ethical And Risk-Management Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Clinical social workers’ use of digital and other technology to provide distance counseling services is proliferating. Increasing numbers of contemporary practitioners are using video counseling, email chat, social networking websites, text messaging, smartphone apps, avatar-based websites, self-guided web-based interventions, and other technology to provide clinical services to clients, some of whom they may never meet in person. The advent of this technology has produced a wide range of ethical challenges related to social workers’ application of traditional social work ethics concepts: client informed consent; client privacy and confidentiality; boundaries and dual relationships; conflicts of interest; practitioner competence; records and documentation ...