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Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Disability, Gender, And Employment Relationships In Africa: The Case Of Ghana, Augustina Naami Jun 2015

Disability, Gender, And Employment Relationships In Africa: The Case Of Ghana, Augustina Naami

Faculty Publications

The exploratory quantitative study sought to develop an understanding about the relationships among disability, gender and employment in Northern Ghana. A total of 110 individuals with disabilities (20–60 years) from various disability groups participated in the study. The results indicate that many persons with disabilities are unemployed, the majority being women. Discrimination is cited as the greatest barrier to the employment of persons with disabilities, particularly women. The majority of persons with disabilities, typically women, live in poverty; given that some are unemployed and those who are employed worked mostly in marginal, seasonal and menial jobs. Persons with disabilities ...


Pastors As Gatekeepers: Congregational Encounters With Mental Health And Substance Abuse Issues, Curtis Vanderwaal, Andrea Opei, Edwin I. Hernandez Apr 2015

Pastors As Gatekeepers: Congregational Encounters With Mental Health And Substance Abuse Issues, Curtis Vanderwaal, Andrea Opei, Edwin I. Hernandez

Faculty Publications

The vocation of a pastor is to care for the spiritual needs of a congregation and community. However, as many clergy know well, pastoral care is multifaceted and complex. For example, one of the hats that pastors frequently wear is that of pastoral counselor. Although pastors have traditionally offered support and pastoral care to congregants, they are beginning to spend more hours counseling both congregants and community members. One study indicated that pastors were spending time in pastoral counseling equivalent to that of marriage and family therapists in private practice.1 The same study showed that pastors are encountering persons ...


Mental Health Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Asian American Community College Students: The Effect Of Stigma, Cultural Barriers, And Acculturation, Meekyung Han, Helen Pong Jan 2015

Mental Health Help-Seeking Behaviors Among Asian American Community College Students: The Effect Of Stigma, Cultural Barriers, And Acculturation, Meekyung Han, Helen Pong

Faculty Publications

According to the 2008 U.S. Census, there are 15.5 million Asian Americans in the United States, and 17% are students enrolled in a university (Shea & Yeh, 2008). Asian American college students in higher education are oftentimes perceived as the “model minority” with high academic achievements and few mental and/or behavioral problems (Park, 2010). In contrast to this general assumption, studies have shown that many Asian American college students suffer from psychological distress (Abe-Kim et al., 2007; Breaux, Matsuoka, & Ryujin, 1997; Lee et al., 2009; Mallinckrodt, Shigeoka, & Suzuki, 2005; Nguyen & Anderson, 2005). In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2008) highlighted considerable disparities in mental health among racial/ethnic groups, including the fact that Asian Americans 15–24 years old have significantly higher suicidal rates than do other racial/ethnic groups of the same age range. Researchers have attributed this mental health disparity to Asian students’ underutilization of professional services. Consequently, a growing number of empirical studies have been conducted to identify the contributors to low mental health service utilization (Abe-Kim et al., 2007; Kim & Park, 2009; Lee et al., 2009; Nguyen & Anderson, 2005; Umemoto, 2004). These studies have found that acculturation, cultural barriers, and stigma attached to mental health problems are common factors that significantly contribute to Asian American college students’ low mental-health-seeking behaviors. However, based on the authors’ knowledge, these studies have focused on Asian American students who attend 4-year colleges. There is very little known about Asian American students ...


Improving Social Work Education In Vietnam Through International Cooperation: The ‘Social Work Education Enhancement Program’, Alice Hines, Edward Cohen, Hoa Nguyen, Laurie Drabble, Meekyung Han, Soma Sen, Tuâán Trâàn Jan 2015

Improving Social Work Education In Vietnam Through International Cooperation: The ‘Social Work Education Enhancement Program’, Alice Hines, Edward Cohen, Hoa Nguyen, Laurie Drabble, Meekyung Han, Soma Sen, Tuâán Trâàn

Faculty Publications

This paper describes an initiative to improve social work education in Vietnam through a three-year international collaborative, including US Aid for International Development, San José State University, eight universities in Vietnam, Vietnam's government ministries, and Cisco Systems, Inc. The social work profession was officially recognized by the Vietnamese government in 2010. Despite the rapid expansion of social work education programs, there are significant limitations in the universities' ability to provide social work education. The goal of the Social Work Education Enhancement Program (SWEEP) is to strengthen the capacity of Vietnam's undergraduate social work programs to deliver quality education ...


Clinical Social Work In A Digital Environment: Ethical And Risk-Management Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2015

Clinical Social Work In A Digital Environment: Ethical And Risk-Management Challenges, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Clinical social workers’ use of digital and other technology to provide distance counseling services is proliferating. Increasing numbers of contemporary practitioners are using video counseling, email chat, social networking websites, text messaging, smartphone apps, avatar-based websites, self-guided web-based interventions, and other technology to provide clinical services to clients, some of whom they may never meet in person. The advent of this technology has produced a wide range of ethical challenges related to social workers’ application of traditional social work ethics concepts: client informed consent; client privacy and confidentiality; boundaries and dual relationships; conflicts of interest; practitioner competence; records and documentation ...


Evolving Ethical Standards In The Digital Age, Frederic G. Reamer Jan 2015

Evolving Ethical Standards In The Digital Age, Frederic G. Reamer

Faculty Publications

Ethical standards in social work have matured significantly since the formal inauguration of the profession in the late 19th century. This article traces the global evolution of ethical standards in social work, focusing especially on current challenges in the digital age. The author discusses changes over time in social workers’ understanding of ethical issues and development of conceptual frameworks and protocols for managing them. Social workers’ increasing use of digital technology poses novel and unprecedented ethical challenges pertaining to privacy, confidentiality, informed consent, professional boundaries, conflicts of interest, documentation, client abandonment, and professionalism, among others. The article outlines emerging ethical ...