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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Child Welfare Intervention In Visible Minority Immigrant Families: The Role Of Poverty And The Mothering Discourse, Ferzana Chaze Oct 2009

Child Welfare Intervention In Visible Minority Immigrant Families: The Role Of Poverty And The Mothering Discourse, Ferzana Chaze

Faculty Publications and Scholarship

This paper explores the relationships between barriers to employment for visible minority immigrants, poverty, Mothering Discourse and child welfare intervention. It is argued that the barriers that visible minority immigrant face in securing suitable employment is the main factor contributing to the poverty of these groups in Canada. The stressors associated with lack of financial security and its associated problems, combined with perceptions regarding cultural norms related to parenting within visible minority populations make the children in these families at risk of child abuse and neglect. The North American Mothering Discourse and the manner in which it causes visible minority ...


A Bottom-Up Definition Of Self-Sufficiency: Voices From Low-Income Jobseekers., Philip Young P. Hong, Vamadu A. Sheriff, Sandra R. Naeger Sep 2009

A Bottom-Up Definition Of Self-Sufficiency: Voices From Low-Income Jobseekers., Philip Young P. Hong, Vamadu A. Sheriff, Sandra R. Naeger

School of Social Work: Faculty Publications and Other Works

Self-sufficiency (SS) is the epitome of America’s ‘reluctant’welfare state. It is generally accepted in social welfare policycircles as a concept related to independence and financialstability. Nevertheless, SS is not a term agreed upon inpractice by policymakers, researchers, or service providersand is frequently used without a clear common definition.In this sense, the purpose of this study is to explore the extentto which the top-down definition of ‘economic’ SS as thesocial policy goal is consistent with how the clients of job training programs perceive the term. Using a groundedtheory approach, a bottom-up definition of SS was derivedfrom a focus ...


The Failures Of American Poverty Measures, Stephen Pimpare Mar 2009

The Failures Of American Poverty Measures, Stephen Pimpare

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

How we think about need or deprivation-how we judge its severity, its causes and effects, and the progress we have made (or not made) over time in reducing it-has much to do with how we define and then measure it. And, we measure it poorly. The insufficiencies of official data on American poverty are reasonably well known, yet they continue, nonetheless, to be the principal means by which we gauge need in the United States. After a review of such official measures, this article discusses alternative means of evaluating need in the United States, highlighting the benefits of examining poverty ...


Welcome To The Neighborhood: Does Where You Live Affect The Use Of Nutrition, Health, And Welfare Programs?, Molly De Marco, Allison C. De Marco Mar 2009

Welcome To The Neighborhood: Does Where You Live Affect The Use Of Nutrition, Health, And Welfare Programs?, Molly De Marco, Allison C. De Marco

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Despite the recent upsurge in neighborhood effects research, few studies have examined the impact of neighborhood characteristics on the use of nutrition, health, and welfare programs. To explore these issues, this study used data from Welfare, Children, and Families: A Three-City Study, a longitudinal dataset comprised of low-income neighborhoods in Boston, San Antonio, and Chicago (n=1,712). Using hierarchical linear models, the results indicated that both individual (education, employment, and marriage) and perceived neighborhood disorder factors were related to social service use.


Testing The Relationship Of Formal Bonding, Informal Bonding, And Formal Bridging Social Capital On Key Outcomes For Families In Low-Income Neighborhoods, Daniel Brisson Mar 2009

Testing The Relationship Of Formal Bonding, Informal Bonding, And Formal Bridging Social Capital On Key Outcomes For Families In Low-Income Neighborhoods, Daniel Brisson

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The development of social capital among families living in low income neighborhoods has become a popular poverty reduction and economic advancement strategy. However conceptual scholarship suggests the broad use of social capital has diminished its importance. Scholars have begun to identify the multiple and overlapping characteristics of social capital and the field now needs empirical studies to show how specific types of social capital are important for families living in low-income neighborhoods. This study tests the relationship between three types of social capital (informal bonding social capital, formal bonding social capital and formal bridging social capital) and important outcomes for ...


Ida Evaluation Handbook: A Practical Guide And Tools For Evaluation Of Pioneering Ida Projects, Michael Sherraden Jan 2009

Ida Evaluation Handbook: A Practical Guide And Tools For Evaluation Of Pioneering Ida Projects, Michael Sherraden

Center for Social Development Research

This IDA Evaluation Handbook is designed as a practical guide with tools for emergent, pioneering IDA (Individual Development Accounts) projects. The goal of this Handbook is to promote early evaluations of IDAs and learn as much as possible from each project.


Breast Cancer Survival In Canada And The Usa: Meta-Analytic Evidence Of A Canadian Advantage In Low-Income Areas, Kevin M. Gorey Jan 2009

Breast Cancer Survival In Canada And The Usa: Meta-Analytic Evidence Of A Canadian Advantage In Low-Income Areas, Kevin M. Gorey

Social Work Publications

BACKGROUND: This study tested the hypothesis that relatively poor Canadian women with breast cancer have a survival advantage over their counterparts in the USA.

METHODS: Seventy-eight independent retrospective cohort (incidence between 1984 and 2000, followed until 2006) outcomes were synthesized. Fixed effects meta-regression models compared women with breast cancer in low-income areas of Canada and the USA.

RESULTS: Low-income Canadian women were advantaged on survival [rate ratio (RR) = 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.15] and their advantage was even larger among women <65 years of age who are not yet eligible for Medicare coverage in the USA (RR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.18-1.24). Canadian advantages were also larger for node positive breast cancer, which may present with greater clinical and managerial discretion (RR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.30-1.50), and smaller when Hawaii, the state providing the most Canadian-like access, was the US comparator (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.20).

CONCLUSIONS: More inclusive health care insurance coverage in Canada vs the USA, particularly among each ...