Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social Work Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Increased Racial Differences On Breast Cancer Care And Survival In America: Historical Evidence Consistent With A Health Insurance Hypothesis, 1975-2001, Kevin M. Gorey Jan 2009

Increased Racial Differences On Breast Cancer Care And Survival In America: Historical Evidence Consistent With A Health Insurance Hypothesis, 1975-2001, Kevin M. Gorey

Social Work Publications

PURPOSE: This study examined whether race/ethnicity had differential effects on breast cancer care and survival across age strata and cohorts within stages of disease.

METHODS: The Detroit Cancer Registry provided 25,997 breast cancer cases. African American and non-Hispanic white, older Medicare-eligible and younger non-eligible women were compared. Successive historical cohorts (1975-1980 and 1990-1995) were, respectively, followed until 1986 and 2001.

RESULTS: African American disadvantages on survival and treatments increased significantly, particularly among younger women who were much more likely to be uninsured. Within node positive disease all treatment disadvantages among younger African American women disappeared with socioeconomic adjustment ...


Welfare-To-Work Programs In America, 1980 To 2005: Meta-Analytic Evidence Of The Importance Of Job And Child Care Availability, Kevin M. Gorey Jan 2009

Welfare-To-Work Programs In America, 1980 To 2005: Meta-Analytic Evidence Of The Importance Of Job And Child Care Availability, Kevin M. Gorey

Social Work Publications

This meta-analysis extended a Campbell Collaboration review of welfare-to-work programs. Its synthesis of 65 randomized trials in America over the past generation replicated a small overall intervention effect. Moreover, it found (1) there was no long-term employment effect of interventions in areas where jobs were relatively unavailable, and (2) programs that provided child care were more effective than those that did not in the short and long term, even in areas of high labor market withdrawal. The availability of jobs as well as such supports as child care that enable their access seem to be key elements of welfare-to-work programs ...


Breast Cancer Survival In Ontario And California, 1998-2006: Socioeconomic Inequity Remains Much Greater In The United States, Kevin M. Gorey Jan 2009

Breast Cancer Survival In Ontario And California, 1998-2006: Socioeconomic Inequity Remains Much Greater In The United States, Kevin M. Gorey

Social Work Publications

This study re-examined the differential effect of socioeconomic status on the survival of women with breast cancer in Canada and the United States. Ontario and California cancer registries provided 1,913 cases from urban and rural places. Stage-adjusted cohorts (1998-2000) were followed until 2006. Socioeconomic data were taken from population censuses. SES-survival associations were observed in California, but not in Ontario, and Canadian survival advantages in low-income areas were replicated. A better controlled and updated comparison reaffirmed the equity advantage of Canadian health care.


Wait Times For Surgical And Adjuvant Radiation Treatment Of Breast Cancer In Canada And The United States: Greater Socioeconomic Inequity In America, Kevin M. Gorey Jan 2009

Wait Times For Surgical And Adjuvant Radiation Treatment Of Breast Cancer In Canada And The United States: Greater Socioeconomic Inequity In America, Kevin M. Gorey

Social Work Publications

PURPOSE: The demand for cancer care has increased among aging North American populations as cancer treatment innovations have proliferated. Gaps between supply and demand may be growing. This study examined whether socioeconomic status has a differential effect on waits for surgical and adjuvant radiation treatment (RT) of breast cancer in Canada and the US.

METHODS: Ontario and California cancer registries provided 929 and 984 breast cancer cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2000 in diverse urban and rural places. Residence-based socioeconomic data were taken from censuses. Cancer care variables were reliably abstracted from health records: stage, receipt of surgery and RT ...


Associations Of Physician Supplies With Breast Cancer Stage At Diagnosis And Survival In Ontario, 1988 To 2006, Kevin M. Gorey Jan 2009

Associations Of Physician Supplies With Breast Cancer Stage At Diagnosis And Survival In Ontario, 1988 To 2006, Kevin M. Gorey

Social Work Publications

BACKGROUND: The authors examined whether the supply of primary care physicians had protective effects on breast cancer stage and survival in Ontario and whether supply losses during the 1990s were associated with diminished protection.

METHODS: Random samples of the Ontario Cancer Registry, respectively, provided 879 women and 951 women who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1988 and 1990 (followed until 1996) and 1998 and 2000 (followed until 2006), respectively. Active physician supply data (1991 and 2001) joined to each woman's census division of residence was taken from the Scott's Medical Database.

RESULTS: Protective thresholds were observed among ...


Breast Cancer Survival In Canada And The Usa: Meta-Analytic Evidence Of A Canadian Advantage In Low-Income Areas, Kevin M. Gorey Jan 2009

Breast Cancer Survival In Canada And The Usa: Meta-Analytic Evidence Of A Canadian Advantage In Low-Income Areas, Kevin M. Gorey

Social Work Publications

BACKGROUND: This study tested the hypothesis that relatively poor Canadian women with breast cancer have a survival advantage over their counterparts in the USA.

METHODS: Seventy-eight independent retrospective cohort (incidence between 1984 and 2000, followed until 2006) outcomes were synthesized. Fixed effects meta-regression models compared women with breast cancer in low-income areas of Canada and the USA.

RESULTS: Low-income Canadian women were advantaged on survival [rate ratio (RR) = 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.15] and their advantage was even larger among women <65 years of age who are not yet eligible for Medicare coverage in the USA (RR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.18-1.24). Canadian advantages were also larger for node positive breast cancer, which may present with greater clinical and managerial discretion (RR = 1.40, 95% CI 1.30-1.50), and smaller when Hawaii, the state providing the most Canadian-like access, was the US comparator (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.01-1.20).

CONCLUSIONS: More inclusive health care insurance coverage in Canada vs the USA, particularly among each ...