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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Do Duluth Model Interventions With Perpetrators Of Domestic Violence Violate Mental Health Professional Ethics?, Ken Corvo, Donald Dutton, Wan-Yi Chen Mar 2015

Do Duluth Model Interventions With Perpetrators Of Domestic Violence Violate Mental Health Professional Ethics?, Ken Corvo, Donald Dutton, Wan-Yi Chen

Wan-Yi Chen

In spite of numerous studies of program outcomes finding little or no positive effect on violent behavior, the Duluth model remains the most common program type of interventions with perpetrators of domestic violence. In addition, Duluth model programs often ignore serious mental health and substance abuse issues present in perpetrators. These and other issues of possible threat to mental health professional ethics are reviewed in light of the court-mandated, compulsory nature of most Duluth model programs and client and victim expectations for program efficacy.


Intimate Partner Violence Against Athabaskan Women Residing In Interior Alaska: Results Of A Victimization Survey, Darryl Wood, Randy Magen Mar 2009

Intimate Partner Violence Against Athabaskan Women Residing In Interior Alaska: Results Of A Victimization Survey, Darryl Wood, Randy Magen

Randy Howard Magen

A survey instrument mirroring the National Violence Against Women Survey was administered in person to measure the incidence and prevalence of intimate partner violence against Athabaskan women residing in the interior of Alaska. Roughly two thirds of respondents (63.7%) reported an intimate partner assault victimization at some point in their adult lifetime, and 18% of the respondents reported that they had been physically assaulted by an intimate partner in the year preceding the survey. Findings revealed that intimate partner assault victimization is more prevalent and is considerably more frequent when compared to that reported for American women in general.


Fathers And Their Infants: Caregiving And Affection In The Modern Family, Terri Combs-Orme, Lauren Renkert Dec 2008

Fathers And Their Infants: Caregiving And Affection In The Modern Family, Terri Combs-Orme, Lauren Renkert

Terri Combs-Orme

Despite social work's expressed interest in families and belief in the importance of parents to children, social work researchers have done little to explore the importance of fathers in children's everyday lives. This is especially true for infants. Moreover, as more and more infants and children grow up in single-mother homes, step-families, and other family configurations, knowledge is needed about how these demographic trends affect parents' interactions with their young children.

This article examines men's caregiving of infants and their displays of affection in a longitudinal study of a diverse sample of infants and their mothers, using ...


Psychometric Examination Of The Brief Multidimensional Measure Of Religiousness/Spirituality (Bmmrs) Among College Students., Paul Caldwell, Kevin Masters, Kate Carey, Stephen Maisto, Thomas Wolfe, Harold Hackney, Christopher France, Lina Himawan Dec 2008

Psychometric Examination Of The Brief Multidimensional Measure Of Religiousness/Spirituality (Bmmrs) Among College Students., Paul Caldwell, Kevin Masters, Kate Carey, Stephen Maisto, Thomas Wolfe, Harold Hackney, Christopher France, Lina Himawan

Paul Caldwell

Resurgent interest in the relations between religiousness/spirituality (R/S) and health is evident in the scientific literature but much of the research fails to capture the proposed multidimensional nature of R/S. This problematic situation is compounded by the existence of a plethora of measures mostly lacking substantial empirical or even theoretical support. The Brief Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness/Spirituality (BMMRS) was developed to address measurement confusion by providing a standard instrument for researchers investigating the dimensions of R/S relevant to health. Psychometric properties and factor structure of the BMMRS were investigated in a sample of 374 college ...


Reducing Out-Of-School Suspensions: Practice Guidelines For School Social Workers, David Dupper, Mt Theriot, Sw Craun Dec 2008

Reducing Out-Of-School Suspensions: Practice Guidelines For School Social Workers, David Dupper, Mt Theriot, Sw Craun

David R. Dupper

In many U.S. school districts, there has been a near epidemic of out-of-school suspensions (OSSs) for relatively minor or vaguely defined student offenses. Suspension provides temporary relief to frustrated teachers and administrators and may result in more parental involvement. However, for a large number of at-risk youths, it appears that being suspended leads to significant problems outside of school, increases the likelihood of receiving additional OSSs, and may result in dropping out of school. As a result, school social workers need to be made aware of programs that focus on the elimination of students' problematic behaviors rather than the ...


Cognitive-Behavioral Model, Randy Magen Dec 2008

Cognitive-Behavioral Model, Randy Magen

Randy Howard Magen

In the 1970s the first articles and books appeared, written by social workers, describing the application of behavioral theory to social work with groups (Rose, 1972; Sundel & Lawrence, 1970). Since that time, cognitive-behavioral theory has become one of the dominant perspectives guiding group work practice. The compatibility between evidence-based practice and cognitive-behaviorally based interventions assures the place of this theory at the forefront of group work.


In Chapter 5, Examples Of Compassion, Resiliency, And Academic Success, Ric And Doug, Sue Martin Dec 2008

In Chapter 5, Examples Of Compassion, Resiliency, And Academic Success, Ric And Doug, Sue Martin

Sue Martin

One of six vignettes from the field, chosen because they illustrate a heart-centered attitude.