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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Getting Your Money's Worth: What Early Childhood Directors Should Know About Working With Mental Health Professionals, Beth L. Green, Maria C. Everhart, Lynwood Gordon Jul 2004

Getting Your Money's Worth: What Early Childhood Directors Should Know About Working With Mental Health Professionals, Beth L. Green, Maria C. Everhart, Lynwood Gordon

Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

The increasing numbers of young children with challenging behaviors and emotional problems have led many child care providers and early childhood education programs to employ or contract with mental health professionals (Lavigne et al., 1996). Head Start Programs, for example, are required by federal performance standards to utilize services of mental health professionals that are "sufficient" to meet the needs of children and families. However, there has been little research to help program managers make informed choices about who might provide the best services, what services are most important to support staff and families, and how to make the best ...


Racial Discrepancies In The Association Between Paternal Vs. Maternal Educational Level And Risk Of Low Birthweight In Washington State, Christina Nicolaidis, Cynthia W. Ko, Somnath Saha, Thomas D. Koepsell Jun 2004

Racial Discrepancies In The Association Between Paternal Vs. Maternal Educational Level And Risk Of Low Birthweight In Washington State, Christina Nicolaidis, Cynthia W. Ko, Somnath Saha, Thomas D. Koepsell

Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

Background: The role of paternal factors in determining the risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes has received less attention than maternal factors. Similarly, the interaction between the effects of race and socioeconomic status (SES) on pregnancy outcomes is not well known. Our objective was to assess the relative importance of paternal vs. maternal education in relation to risk of low birth weight (LBW) across different racial groups. Methods: We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study using Washington state birth certificate data from 1992 to 1996 (n = 264,789). We assessed the associations between maternal or paternal education and LBW, adjusting for ...


Supporting Families Of Children With Serious Emotional Or Behavioral Disorders In A 24/7 World, Julie M. Rosenzweig, Eileen M. Brennan, April Burris, Christine Mary Shea Jan 2004

Supporting Families Of Children With Serious Emotional Or Behavioral Disorders In A 24/7 World, Julie M. Rosenzweig, Eileen M. Brennan, April Burris, Christine Mary Shea

Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

PDF version of a presentation given at the Training Institutes on Developing Local Systems of Care for Children and Adolescents with Emotional Disturbances and their Families, San Francisco, CA, June 2004.


Models Of Inclusion In Child Care: Child Care That Works For Children With Emotional And/Or Behavioral Challenges: Family Member Perceptions, Shane Ama, Eileen M. Brennan, Sara Berman, Jennifer R. Bradley Jan 2004

Models Of Inclusion In Child Care: Child Care That Works For Children With Emotional And/Or Behavioral Challenges: Family Member Perceptions, Shane Ama, Eileen M. Brennan, Sara Berman, Jennifer R. Bradley

Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

Although 5-10% of employed parents care for a child with emotional or behavioral challenges (EBCs) (Emlen, 1997), family support resources are notably lacking. A recent focus group study of 41 working parents (Rosenzweig, Brennan, & Ogilvie, 2002) found child care to be particularly difficult to find and maintain for families that included children with EBCs. Participants reported a number of barriers to child care arrangements that could successfully meet their family's needs. First, since few qualified providers had the expertise to meet the needs of children with EBCs, arrangements were difficult to find. A combination of the lack of quality ...


Promoting Inclusion In Child Care Centers: Learning From Success, Jennifer R. Bradley, Shane Ama, Maria Gettman, Eileen M. Brennan, Peris W. Kibera Jan 2004

Promoting Inclusion In Child Care Centers: Learning From Success, Jennifer R. Bradley, Shane Ama, Maria Gettman, Eileen M. Brennan, Peris W. Kibera

Social Work Faculty Publications and Presentations

The purpose of this article is to share findings from research on nine child care centers that successfully provided child care for children with emotional and behavioral challenges alongside their peers without specific challenges (Brennan, Bradley, Ama, & Cawood, 2003). Following a brief overview of the research study, we focus a lens on the classroom, where staff selected and developed practices that included all children. The lens is then widened to view a broader picture of inclusion, such as the ways that the centers work with families, and the structure and culture of the organizations.