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1976

Western Michigan University

Sociology

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Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 4, No. 2 (November 1976) Nov 1976

Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 4, No. 2 (November 1976)

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

ISSUE EDITOR: JEFFRY GALPER, TEMPLE UNIVERSITY

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Editorial - pp. 164
  • The Rank and File Movement: The Relevance of Radical Social Work Traditions to Modern Social Work Practice - LESLIE LEIGHNINGER & ROBERT KNICKMEYER - pp. 166
  • Communication Disturbances in a Welfare Bureaucracy: A Case for Self-Management - ROBERT E. O'CONNOR & LARRY D. SPENCE - pp. 178
  • The Politics of Drug Addiction: A Comparison of United States and Chinese Drug Policies Since 1949 - RICHARD FORTMANN - pp. 205
  • Housing as a Process of Community Development GARY D. ASKEROTH - pp. 218
  • Central Appalachia: A Peripheral Region Within an Advanced Capitalist Society - DAVID S. WALLS - pp ...


The Politics Of Drug Addiction: A Comparison Of United States And Chinese Drug Policies Since 1949, Richard Fortmann Nov 1976

The Politics Of Drug Addiction: A Comparison Of United States And Chinese Drug Policies Since 1949, Richard Fortmann

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

During the past decade the increase in drug use and drug addiction in the United States has been viewed with growing alarm. Drug addiction has been compared to a contagious disease, an epidemic which is raging in our cities and towns. Although the rhetoric has become more dramatic, the drug problem is certainly not a new one. This paper is concerned with the historic failure of United States policies to eliminate or even to contain drug abuse and drug addiction. It is the central thesis of this paper that drug addiction is a social disease, and as such is symptomatic ...


Integrated Cooperation Within A Grass-Roots Movement’S The Class Emphasis, John C. Leggett, Frances V. Mouldner Nov 1976

Integrated Cooperation Within A Grass-Roots Movement’S The Class Emphasis, John C. Leggett, Frances V. Mouldner

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Under what conditions is it possible for members of different racial groups to cooperate in an integrated sense to build a successful, working class, community based, mutual benefits association -- one with the long-term intent of organizing workplaces where mutual-benefits association members happen to work? Can this inter-racial cooperation occur at all levels of the organization? Given this long term possibility of unionization, an end product not too different from an association-union recently achieved by Caesar Chavez's "NFWA-UFVOC", what are the initial organizational prerequisites for successfully bringing together blacks, whites, Chicanos, Puerto Ricans and others within these local associations?


Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 4, No. 1 (September 1976) Sep 1976

Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 4, No. 1 (September 1976)

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Editorial - pp. 3
  • What Kind of Sociology is Useful to Social Workers? - ALFRED McCLUNG LEE - pp. 4
  • Toward a Working Model for Community Organizing in the 1970's - JOHN L. MUSICK, NANCY R. HOOYMAN - pp. 14
  • The Incremental Trail in Developing False Doctrine and its Consequences in the American Drug Scene - AVRON HEILIGMAN - pp. 19
  • A Locality-Oriented Public Welfare Agency: A Case Study of Boundary Maintenance in a Hostile Environment - RAY H. MACNAIR, GRETA HAWTHORNE - pp. 27
  • An Economic Analysis of Economic Inequality - JOHN P. HUTTMAN - pp. 47
  • Phenomenological Social Science and Holistic Social Policy - THOMAS D ...


What Kind Of Sociology Is Useful To Social Workers?, Alfred Mcclung Lee Sep 1976

What Kind Of Sociology Is Useful To Social Workers?, Alfred Mcclung Lee

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Both social workers and sociologists have been trying desperately for more than a century to live down their miscellaneous ancestry. Both are still embarrassed that their disciplines are rooted historically in the work of oldtime clergy, police, utopian philosophers, sentimentalists, reactionary manipulators, and radical thinkers and agitators. Nevertheless it was from those men's and women's concerns, their perceptions of social problems, their efforts at social amelioration and reform or revolution, and their inter-cult conflicts that the two corps of modern professionals sprang.


Toward A Working Model For Community Organizing In The 1970'S, John L. Musick, Nancy R. Hooyman Sep 1976

Toward A Working Model For Community Organizing In The 1970'S, John L. Musick, Nancy R. Hooyman

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The authors critique the service delivery model for solving community problems and stress the value of citizens developing their capabilities to attack the source of problems. A model for grass roots, autonomous, multi-issue citizens organizations is presented.


The Incremental Trail In Developing False Doctrine And Its Consequences In The American Drug Scene, Avron Heiligman Sep 1976

The Incremental Trail In Developing False Doctrine And Its Consequences In The American Drug Scene, Avron Heiligman

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The trail of what has turned out to be the criminalization of drug taking behavior illustrates a major criticism of incrementalism in developing policy-- the acceptance and maintenance of specific values and attitudes. The effects of false doctrine accepted more than fifty years ago are with us today and will continue in their effect umtil a radical change is seen in our society. The purpose of this paper is to map the old trail, identify those times where false doctrine was accepted, and to present a radical alternative for the future.


Issues In Evaluative Research: Implications For Social Work, John S. Wodarski, Walter Hudson, David R. Buckholdt Sep 1976

Issues In Evaluative Research: Implications For Social Work, John S. Wodarski, Walter Hudson, David R. Buckholdt

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Various issues in evaluative research are reviewed according to their relevance for the evaluation of social work practice. Specific items discussed are: plausible studies, what should be changed and why, the change agent, criteria for positive assessment, traditional research designs, time-series designs, organizational aspects of research, researchers vs clinicians, researcher's distance from populations served, incentives for research, and the dissemination of information and application of relevant knowledge. Where relevant, aspects of certain evaluative studies are discussed to illustrate the items reviewed.


Towards The Development Of Theory: Cultural Pluralism Redefined, Antonia Pantoja, Wilhelmina Perry, Barbara Blourock Sep 1976

Towards The Development Of Theory: Cultural Pluralism Redefined, Antonia Pantoja, Wilhelmina Perry, Barbara Blourock

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The authors are attempting to move beyond the descriptive position, evidenced in the current writing, towards a theoretical approach to cultural pluralism. A series of definitions are presented concluding with the authors' definition of cultural pluralism - redefined. The new definition is discussed, as an operational concept, emanating from participants in the new cultural pluralism movement.

The current societal conditions that impede the realization of cultural pluralism are discussed in relation to a conceptual model, Criteria for Assigning Preferred or Unpreferred Status, that is used to explain our society's idealization of certain personal, social, and economic characteristics.

The authors conclude ...


Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 3, No. 6 (July 1976) Jul 1976

Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 3, No. 6 (July 1976)

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Issue Editors: DR. ROBERT CREEN, School of Social Work - UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT, DR. FLORENCE KASLOW, HAHNEMANN MEDICAL COLLEGE

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • Editorial - pp. 620
  • The Family - 100 Years of Neglect - FRANK J. MONTEMURO, Jr - pp. 622
  • Crime Victims and Public Policy - JOE HUDSON, BURT GALAWAY - pp. 629
  • The Dysfunctional Dialectics of the Prison - RICHARD A. BALL - pp. 636
  • The Death Penalty and Discretion: Implications of the FURMAN Decision For Criminal Justice - MARC RIEDEL - pp. 649
  • Educating Social Workers For Evolving Roles In Corrections - FLORENCE KASLOW, STEWART WARNER - pp. 656
  • Indigenous Correctional Paraprofessionals: "Bourgeois Nigger or Empathetic Worker?" "A Brief Position ...


The Family - 100 Years Of Neglect, Frank J. Montemuro Jul 1976

The Family - 100 Years Of Neglect, Frank J. Montemuro

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The following address was made at an All-Day Institute convened by the Family Court Division of the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas in conjunction with the Family Institute of Philadelphia to explore issues and new responsibilities faced by public and private agencies dealing with the myriad changes in family life in this last decade of social upheaval.


Crime Victims And Public Social Policy, Joe Hudson, Burt Galaway Jul 1976

Crime Victims And Public Social Policy, Joe Hudson, Burt Galaway

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The administration of criminal law has traditionally Ignored the role of the victim and focused on the criminal offender. Increasingly, however, social policy and programs are beginning to take Into consideration the situation of the crime victim. Programs designed to focus on offender restitution to crime victims are being developed and Implemented at various stages of the criminal Justice system. At the same time, programs of state compensation to crime victims are being Implemented in an Increasing number of jurisdictions.


The Dysfunctional Dialectics Of The Prison, Richard A. Ball Jul 1976

The Dysfunctional Dialectics Of The Prison, Richard A. Ball

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

According to the functionalist perspective, the survival of an organization is a matter of functions performed. A dialectical framework allows us to deal with the fact that durability is not necessarily connected with functionality. Organizations may be built on retrogressive accomodations which amount to dysfunctional dialectics. The prison represents an example in that it has developed as a polarity of commonweal and service organization, and is divided against itself. The coercive structure results in compliance patterns of an alienative nature. The basic dialectical units are roles which divide prisoners by emphasizing power relationships. Staff authority is weakened by a process ...


Educating Social Workers For Evolving Roles In Corrections, Florence Kaslow, Stewart Werner Jul 1976

Educating Social Workers For Evolving Roles In Corrections, Florence Kaslow, Stewart Werner

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The sought after concept of "socialized justice" toward which we aspire will hopefully emerge a reality in the Twentieth Century. The pendulum swings from the public's indignation and outrage toward the violent and heinous crimes of our times to the advance of modern correctional methods and techniques stimulated by changing social forces and federally funded programs; the humanization of our prisons, facilities and field services is the result. Gains are being made which are beginning to be felt, in which prescribed treatment programs tailored to meet the needs of the individual are beginning to pay dividends. This advance speaks ...


Indigenous Correctional Paraprofessionals: "Bourgeois Nigger Or Empathetic Worker?" - A Brief Position Paper, Robert J. Wicks Jul 1976

Indigenous Correctional Paraprofessionals: "Bourgeois Nigger Or Empathetic Worker?" - A Brief Position Paper, Robert J. Wicks

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Employment of paraprofessionals in correctional settings is no longer considered to be a controversial experiment. Their involvement in institutional and community-based programs is expected today. To utilize only professionals such as social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, and penologists is considered to be an outdated waste of available personnel. A number of recent, comprehensive reports have borne this out (Gartner, 1971; Sobey, 1970; Arnhoff & Rubenstein, 1969; Grosser, Henry & Kelly, 1969).


Police As Social Service Workers?, Robert Green Jul 1976

Police As Social Service Workers?, Robert Green

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This is a subject area that is not easily or directly approached, for the state of the knowledge rests primarily upon educated guesses, intuitive hunches and intellectual speculation. Little hard empirical data is available. We are still trying to determine how many police departments we have, let alone understand them. The most extensive surve of the criminal justice system ever attempted in this country concluded in 1967 that we had more than 40,000 departments (President's Commission, 1967). Using more sophisticated sampling techniques, L.E.A.A. reported in 1970 that the number was closer to 14,900; by ...


Police Professionalism: Another Look At The Issues, Samuel Walker Jul 1976

Police Professionalism: Another Look At The Issues, Samuel Walker

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The concept of professionalism is frequently used as a frame of reference for evaluating the organizational status of the American police. Observers generally conclude that the police lack most of the essential features of professional status. This paper questions the utility of using such a standard for evaluating the police. The professions of medicine, law and education are themselves in a state of flux. In particular, the crucial concept of professional autonomy appears increasingly incompatible with the goal of public accountability. Rather than expect the police to strive toward the traditional forms of professionalism, we should think in terms of ...


A Rehabilitation Model For The Adult Offender, Morton Zivan Jul 1976

A Rehabilitation Model For The Adult Offender, Morton Zivan

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

In the face of ever-increasing crime rates, corrections has come under considerable criticism, simultaneously being called too lenient by same and too harsh by others. The historical facts clearly shrew that corrections has been a monolithic and simplistic response to one of our most complex social problems. Retributive punishment has been the single guiding objective, and incarceration has been the principal medium. That this approach has been a multi-billion dollar unmitigatedly tragic failure is evidenced by the fact that of the 90% of offenders who ultimately return to the cammunity after release from prison, an estimated 65% recidivate (U.S ...


Psychodramatic Treatment Techniques With Prisoners In A State Of Role Transition, Kenneth Byrne Jul 1976

Psychodramatic Treatment Techniques With Prisoners In A State Of Role Transition, Kenneth Byrne

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

One of the inevitable results of incarceration is the difficulty faced by the offender at the time of his release in his re-entry to a free society. He must adjust to a system which in today's rapidly changinq, technological world, has often chanoed drastically since the time of his entry. The prisoner has had an extended period of time in the prison community in which to warm up to the role of inmate, with its concommitant behavior. (Johnson, Savitz & Wolfgang, pp. 383-496).


The Death Penalty And Discretion: Implications Of The Furman Decision For Criminal Justice, Marc Riedel Jul 1976

The Death Penalty And Discretion: Implications Of The Furman Decision For Criminal Justice, Marc Riedel

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Whether the deatn penalty should remain as a penalty available in American criminal law continues to be a subject of controversy among social scientists, lawyers, the judiciary and the public. While the traditional areas of debate over whether the death penalty is a deterrent and whether it is imposed ina discriminatory manner continue to be important issues, the recent Supreme Court decision (Furman v Georgia, 1972) and subsequent legislation has introduced another dimension: the nature and use of discretion.

Current litigation on the death penalty (Fowler v North Carolina, 1974) is directed toward a resolution of issues raised by Furman ...


Community Milieu Approach: Resource For Criminal Justice System, Jack Sarmanian, Peter Knox Jul 1976

Community Milieu Approach: Resource For Criminal Justice System, Jack Sarmanian, Peter Knox

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Never before in our history has there been such a need for sophisticated programming to deal with the deviant patterns of behavior that are becoming so prevalent in our society. Violent acting out, and a myriad of other self-destructive and socially unacceptable behaviors are emerging which demand immediate attention. This article is devoted to describing the approach of a community-based counseling/rehabilitative program that has responded to the dilemma.

Adolescent Counseling in Development was created several years ago to answer the specific need of a community experiencing a tremendous increase in the use and abuse of drugs. The program has ...


Police And Social Workers As Members Of New Crisis-Management Teams, Karl Schonborn Jul 1976

Police And Social Workers As Members Of New Crisis-Management Teams, Karl Schonborn

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

A variety of programs have emerged of late which involve the close collaboration and cooperation of police and social workers in order to deal with family crises. By pooling their respective skills and resources, police and social workers hope to respond more effectively to the diverse situations and challenges presented by family crises. Several of these programs are reviewed here and one is probed in depth. Also, various questions are raised regarding some of the possible problems associated with this kind of collaboration.


Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 3, No. 5 (May 1976) May 1976

Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 3, No. 5 (May 1976)

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  • An Examination of "Right to Treatment" Standards: Mental Health Policy Within The Context of The State Hospital System - KATHRYN GLASS - pp.492
  • Differential Utilization of the Health Care Delivery System by Members of Ethnic Minorities - PATRICIA A. BROWN - pp.516
  • Community Planning Organizations Coping With Their Problems: The Case of The Welfare Council - FRED M. COX, JOHN E. TROPMAN - pp.524
  • Community Organization Practice: An Elaboration of Rothman's Typology - JERRY D. STOCKDALE - pp.541
  • Dilemmas of Planning and Self-Determination - CHARLES D. COWGER - pp. 552
  • The Practice Implications of Interorganizational Theory For Services Integration - NANCY RUNKLE HOOYMAN ...


Differential Utilization Of The Health Care Delivery System By Members Of Ethnic Minorities, Patricia A. Brown May 1976

Differential Utilization Of The Health Care Delivery System By Members Of Ethnic Minorities, Patricia A. Brown

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Research and statistical reports of the 1960's strongly attested to the underutilization of the health care delivery system by members of ethnic minorities. For example, a 1968 national report on hospital utilization showed that a larger proportion of white persons was hospitalized than were persons of 'color.'I This was found to be true regardless of sex and age; but "... as family income increased, the rate for white persons and those of other races became closer." This fact not withstanding, each income level saw whites using hospitalization more than persons of 'color.' Reasons for this difference in utilization were ...


The Practice Implications Of Interorganizational Theory For Services Integration, Nancy Runkle Hooyman May 1976

The Practice Implications Of Interorganizational Theory For Services Integration, Nancy Runkle Hooyman

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The interorganizational theories of Litwak and Rothman and Levine and White are utilized to suggest the need for practitioners, involved in services integration efforts, to consider the situational variables of size, resources, awareness of interdependence, and type of task exchanged. The effect of these variables upon the formality and autonomy of linkage mechanisms between human service agencies is illustrated in terms of a regional services integration project in Minnesota. Implications are presented for practitioners who are attempting to coordinate services.


Consultation As A Mode Of Field Instruction, Frank B. Raymond May 1976

Consultation As A Mode Of Field Instruction, Frank B. Raymond

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

In recent years both pedagogical and pragmatic considerations have prompted numerous experiments in field instruction for social work education. A novel approach used by one school is based on a consultation model. In this mode of field instruction a faculty based field instructor serves as a consultant to the student placed in a community agency. The relationship between consultee and consultant is distinctly different from that which exists between a student and a "teacher," "instructor," or "supervisor" in traditional field placements. Rather than a hierarchical, obligatory relationship, there exists between consultant and consultee a coordinate, facultative relationship in which the ...


Upward Mobility Potential Attitudes Toward Mental Illness And Working-Class Youth, Gary Rosenberg, Honey A. Mendelson May 1976

Upward Mobility Potential Attitudes Toward Mental Illness And Working-Class Youth, Gary Rosenberg, Honey A. Mendelson

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The investigators were interested in assessing the relationship between upward mobility potential and attitudes toward mental illness. For the 147 male adolescents studied, it was hypothesized that those working-class youth who demonstrated a high predictability of future upward social mobility would score more liberally on the five factors of the Opinions about Mental Illness Scale than those working-class youth who demonstrated a low predictability of future upward social mobility. Through the use of the aforementioned scale, the Otis Quick Scoring Mental Ability Test and Zero Order Correlations, the hypothesized relationship was confirmed; i.e., the upwardly mobile group was significantly ...


Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1976) Mar 1976

Journal Of Sociology & Social Welfare Vol. 3, No. 4 (March 1976)

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Issue Editor: PRANAB CHATTERJEE, School of Applied Social Sciences, CASE-WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

  • Editorial, pp. 370
  • Philosophy, Sociology and The Theory of Social Welfare: A Conceptual Starting Point - ROBERT D. HERMAN, pp. 371
  • Evaluation Research: Some Possible Contexts of Theory Failure - PRANAB CHATTERJE, LENORE OLSEN, THOMAS P. HOLLAND, pp. 384
  • Social Participation and Social Integration of The Aged: Implications for Social Welfare - ELLEN FISCHGHUND, pp. 409
  • Public Housing for the Elderly - CARA J. ORBEN, pp. 421
  • Block Clubs and Social Action: A Case Study In Community Conflict - MOHAN L. KAUL, pp. 437
  • An Analysis of Political Violence with Ramifications for Options ...


Philosophy, Sociology And The Theory Of Social Welfare: A Conceptual Starting Point, Robert D. Herman Mar 1976

Philosophy, Sociology And The Theory Of Social Welfare: A Conceptual Starting Point, Robert D. Herman

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

In this paper I want to explore and 2begin to elucidate a fundamental problem in social welfare theory. The problem centers on the conception of the relation between individuals and social structure. Before proceeding with this task, it is important to note the senses in which the term "social welfare" will be used. The term has two basic senses, deriving from two more or less distinct intellectual traditions. In one sense the term refers to the provision of goods and services to needy individuals, either through government "transfers" or private philanthropy. In this comparatively narrow sense social welfare is a ...


Evaluation Research: Some Possible Contexts Of Theory Failure, Pranab Chatterjee, Lenore Olsen, Thomas P. Holland Mar 1976

Evaluation Research: Some Possible Contexts Of Theory Failure, Pranab Chatterjee, Lenore Olsen, Thomas P. Holland

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

What can evaluation research tell us about social science theory? It is the purpose of this paper to examine that question. There has been much written in the current literature about the relationship between theory and practice. Because it is evaluation research (Breedlove, 1972: 71-89; Newbrough, 1966: 39-52; Suchman, 1971: 43-48; Suchman, 1967; Weiss, 1973: 37-45; Fitz- Gibbons and Morris, 1975: 1-4) that attempts to analyze the results of practice, it is the authors' belief that an examination of evaluation research studies for possible contexts of theory failure will contribute to a linkage between theory and practice.