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1976

Criminology

Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Social Work

The Incremental Trail In Developing False Doctrine And Its Consequences In The American Drug Scene, Avron Heiligman Sep 1976

The Incremental Trail In Developing False Doctrine And Its Consequences In The American Drug Scene, Avron Heiligman

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The trail of what has turned out to be the criminalization of drug taking behavior illustrates a major criticism of incrementalism in developing policy-- the acceptance and maintenance of specific values and attitudes. The effects of false doctrine accepted more than fifty years ago are with us today and will continue in their effect umtil a radical change is seen in our society. The purpose of this paper is to map the old trail, identify those times where false doctrine was accepted, and to present a radical alternative for the future.


The Death Penalty And Discretion: Implications Of The Furman Decision For Criminal Justice, Marc Riedel Jul 1976

The Death Penalty And Discretion: Implications Of The Furman Decision For Criminal Justice, Marc Riedel

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Whether the deatn penalty should remain as a penalty available in American criminal law continues to be a subject of controversy among social scientists, lawyers, the judiciary and the public. While the traditional areas of debate over whether the death penalty is a deterrent and whether it is imposed ina discriminatory manner continue to be important issues, the recent Supreme Court decision (Furman v Georgia, 1972) and subsequent legislation has introduced another dimension: the nature and use of discretion.

Current litigation on the death penalty (Fowler v North Carolina, 1974) is directed toward a resolution of issues raised by Furman ...


Crime Victims And Public Social Policy, Joe Hudson, Burt Galaway Jul 1976

Crime Victims And Public Social Policy, Joe Hudson, Burt Galaway

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The administration of criminal law has traditionally Ignored the role of the victim and focused on the criminal offender. Increasingly, however, social policy and programs are beginning to take Into consideration the situation of the crime victim. Programs designed to focus on offender restitution to crime victims are being developed and Implemented at various stages of the criminal Justice system. At the same time, programs of state compensation to crime victims are being Implemented in an Increasing number of jurisdictions.


The Dysfunctional Dialectics Of The Prison, Richard A. Ball Jul 1976

The Dysfunctional Dialectics Of The Prison, Richard A. Ball

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

According to the functionalist perspective, the survival of an organization is a matter of functions performed. A dialectical framework allows us to deal with the fact that durability is not necessarily connected with functionality. Organizations may be built on retrogressive accomodations which amount to dysfunctional dialectics. The prison represents an example in that it has developed as a polarity of commonweal and service organization, and is divided against itself. The coercive structure results in compliance patterns of an alienative nature. The basic dialectical units are roles which divide prisoners by emphasizing power relationships. Staff authority is weakened by a process ...


Educating Social Workers For Evolving Roles In Corrections, Florence Kaslow, Stewart Werner Jul 1976

Educating Social Workers For Evolving Roles In Corrections, Florence Kaslow, Stewart Werner

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The sought after concept of "socialized justice" toward which we aspire will hopefully emerge a reality in the Twentieth Century. The pendulum swings from the public's indignation and outrage toward the violent and heinous crimes of our times to the advance of modern correctional methods and techniques stimulated by changing social forces and federally funded programs; the humanization of our prisons, facilities and field services is the result. Gains are being made which are beginning to be felt, in which prescribed treatment programs tailored to meet the needs of the individual are beginning to pay dividends. This advance speaks ...


Police And Social Workers As Members Of New Crisis-Management Teams, Karl Schonborn Jul 1976

Police And Social Workers As Members Of New Crisis-Management Teams, Karl Schonborn

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

A variety of programs have emerged of late which involve the close collaboration and cooperation of police and social workers in order to deal with family crises. By pooling their respective skills and resources, police and social workers hope to respond more effectively to the diverse situations and challenges presented by family crises. Several of these programs are reviewed here and one is probed in depth. Also, various questions are raised regarding some of the possible problems associated with this kind of collaboration.


Police As Social Service Workers?, Robert Green Jul 1976

Police As Social Service Workers?, Robert Green

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This is a subject area that is not easily or directly approached, for the state of the knowledge rests primarily upon educated guesses, intuitive hunches and intellectual speculation. Little hard empirical data is available. We are still trying to determine how many police departments we have, let alone understand them. The most extensive surve of the criminal justice system ever attempted in this country concluded in 1967 that we had more than 40,000 departments (President's Commission, 1967). Using more sophisticated sampling techniques, L.E.A.A. reported in 1970 that the number was closer to 14,900; by ...


Police Professionalism: Another Look At The Issues, Samuel Walker Jul 1976

Police Professionalism: Another Look At The Issues, Samuel Walker

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The concept of professionalism is frequently used as a frame of reference for evaluating the organizational status of the American police. Observers generally conclude that the police lack most of the essential features of professional status. This paper questions the utility of using such a standard for evaluating the police. The professions of medicine, law and education are themselves in a state of flux. In particular, the crucial concept of professional autonomy appears increasingly incompatible with the goal of public accountability. Rather than expect the police to strive toward the traditional forms of professionalism, we should think in terms of ...


Community Milieu Approach: Resource For Criminal Justice System, Jack Sarmanian, Peter Knox Jul 1976

Community Milieu Approach: Resource For Criminal Justice System, Jack Sarmanian, Peter Knox

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Never before in our history has there been such a need for sophisticated programming to deal with the deviant patterns of behavior that are becoming so prevalent in our society. Violent acting out, and a myriad of other self-destructive and socially unacceptable behaviors are emerging which demand immediate attention. This article is devoted to describing the approach of a community-based counseling/rehabilitative program that has responded to the dilemma.

Adolescent Counseling in Development was created several years ago to answer the specific need of a community experiencing a tremendous increase in the use and abuse of drugs. The program has ...


A Rehabilitation Model For The Adult Offender, Morton Zivan Jul 1976

A Rehabilitation Model For The Adult Offender, Morton Zivan

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

In the face of ever-increasing crime rates, corrections has come under considerable criticism, simultaneously being called too lenient by same and too harsh by others. The historical facts clearly shrew that corrections has been a monolithic and simplistic response to one of our most complex social problems. Retributive punishment has been the single guiding objective, and incarceration has been the principal medium. That this approach has been a multi-billion dollar unmitigatedly tragic failure is evidenced by the fact that of the 90% of offenders who ultimately return to the cammunity after release from prison, an estimated 65% recidivate (U.S ...


Psychodramatic Treatment Techniques With Prisoners In A State Of Role Transition, Kenneth Byrne Jul 1976

Psychodramatic Treatment Techniques With Prisoners In A State Of Role Transition, Kenneth Byrne

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

One of the inevitable results of incarceration is the difficulty faced by the offender at the time of his release in his re-entry to a free society. He must adjust to a system which in today's rapidly changinq, technological world, has often chanoed drastically since the time of his entry. The prisoner has had an extended period of time in the prison community in which to warm up to the role of inmate, with its concommitant behavior. (Johnson, Savitz & Wolfgang, pp. 383-496).