Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social Work Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 10 of 10

Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Keeping Your Wits, Staying Happy, And Being The Best You Can Be In Practice, Elizabeth Strand Feb 2015

Keeping Your Wits, Staying Happy, And Being The Best You Can Be In Practice, Elizabeth Strand

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

No abstract provided.


Homeless Animal Caretakers: A Descriptive And Comparative Study, C Cronley, Elizabeth Strand, D Patterson, S Gwaltney Dec 2008

Homeless Animal Caretakers: A Descriptive And Comparative Study, C Cronley, Elizabeth Strand, D Patterson, S Gwaltney

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

Data from a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) were used to compare homeless people who report caring for animals with homeless people who do not report caring for animals, based on demographic variables and stated reasons for homelessness. Among homeless clients (N = 4,100; M age = 39 yr., SD 13.2), 5.5% reported animal caretaking; demographic differences between caretaking and not caretaking homeless clients and life factors related to homelessness were most often associated with animal caretaking. 41% of participants (n = 1,664) were female, and 59% (n = 2,436) were male. Findings suggest that first-time homeless, Euro-American women ...


Fear, Guilt, And Grief: Harm To Pets And The Emotional Abuse Of Women, C.A. Faver, Elizabeth Strand Dec 2006

Fear, Guilt, And Grief: Harm To Pets And The Emotional Abuse Of Women, C.A. Faver, Elizabeth Strand

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

No abstract provided.


Non-Anxious Presence: A Key Attribute Of The Successful Veterinarian, Elizabeth Strand Dec 2005

Non-Anxious Presence: A Key Attribute Of The Successful Veterinarian, Elizabeth Strand

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

In the recent past much has been written about non-technical skills in veterinary medical education. This dialogue has focused extensively on competence in behaviorally based communication skills for successful veterinary practice. Other relationship-based communication skills are also useful in communication, such as self-awareness, flexibility, non-judgment (compassion), and being present. All of these relationally based skills are present in the concept of non-anxious presence. This article will review the history of the term “non-anxious presence” (NAP), discuss a proposed model of NAP for the veterinary medical environment, and review some methods useful in teaching NAP in veterinary medical education.


Quality Of Life And Stress Factors For Veterinary Medical Students, Elizabeth Strand, T.L. Zaparanick, James Brace Dec 2004

Quality Of Life And Stress Factors For Veterinary Medical Students, Elizabeth Strand, T.L. Zaparanick, James Brace

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

Psychological distress has been shown to affect the academic success, health, emotional well-being, and dropout rates of medical students. Although it can be assumed that stress has similar effects on veterinary students, there is a paucity of research pertaining to the psychological stressors and coping strategies of this group. This article focuses on selected non-academic areas (as identified through a survey of currently enrolled students) that can create significant stressors for veterinary students. Also assessed and discussed here are poor coping strategies (e.g., substance abuse) and gender differences in perceived stressors and coping strategies that emerged from the survey ...


Battered Women’S Concern For Pets: A Closer Look, Elizabeth Strand, C.A. Faver Dec 2004

Battered Women’S Concern For Pets: A Closer Look, Elizabeth Strand, C.A. Faver

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

A brief narrative description of the journal article, document, or resource. Building on the foundation of previous research about battered women's experiences with animal abuse, this study takes a closer look at: (1) the factors associated with battered women's concern for their pets and (2) decision making associated with this concern. Quantitative survey data of in-shelter domestic violence victims as well as qualitative interview data relating a domestic violence worker's experiences with pet-owning battered women are reported. Study results include: (1) a small proportion of battered women are prompted to leave abusive relationships because of concern for ...


Interparental Conflict And Youth Maladjustment: The Buffering Effects Of Pets, Elizabeth Strand Dec 2003

Interparental Conflict And Youth Maladjustment: The Buffering Effects Of Pets, Elizabeth Strand

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

Children who experience interparental conflict have more difficulty with internalizing and externalizing problems. Children's ability to manage their emotional and physiological arousal buffer them from the effects of interparental conflict. The child-pet bond is associated with emotional and physiological management, yet researchers have not explored the buffering effects of this relationship in the face of interparental conflict. This article reviews salient literature and presents implications for social work research and practice on this topic.


The Effects Of Economic Policies And Employment Assistance Programs On The Well-Being Of Displaced Female Apparel Workers, Cynthia Rocha, Elizabeth Strand Dec 2003

The Effects Of Economic Policies And Employment Assistance Programs On The Well-Being Of Displaced Female Apparel Workers, Cynthia Rocha, Elizabeth Strand

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

This article explores howlabor market trends and current employment assistance policies affect reemployment opportunities and emotional well-being in a sample of female dislocated apparelworkers. The study follows the displacedwomen from the time the plant closed for 6 months to assess their financial and emotional well-being as they reentered the job market or enrolled in training programs. Averagewages of the reemployedwomen were less than their former plantwage; 14% lost their health insurance, and only half thewomen in training were in programs leading to higher paying jobs. Although some emotional recovery occurred, single parents still showed signs of depression after 6 months ...


To Leave Or To Stay? Battered Women’S Concern For Vulnerable Pets, C.A. Faver, Elizabeth Strand Dec 2002

To Leave Or To Stay? Battered Women’S Concern For Vulnerable Pets, C.A. Faver, Elizabeth Strand

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

Consistent with previous research, almost half of a sample of 41 pet-owning battered women reported that their partners had threatened or actually harmed their pets, and over a fourth reported that concern for their pets had affected their decisions about leaving or staying with the batterer. Differences between rural and urban women were not significant, although higher proportions of rural than urban women reported that their partners had threatened or harmed their pets and that concern for their pets had affected their decisions. For the sample as a whole, logistic regression analyses showed that women whose pets had been threatened ...


Domestic Violence And Animal Cruelty: Untangling The Web Of Abuse, C.A. Faver, Elizabeth Strand Dec 2002

Domestic Violence And Animal Cruelty: Untangling The Web Of Abuse, C.A. Faver, Elizabeth Strand

Elizabeth Strand, PhD, LCSW

During the past 25 years, a growing body of research has documented the links between animal cruelty and interpersonal violence (Lockwood & Ascione, 1998; Ascione & Arkow, 1999). As a result, some communities have formed coalitions of human service and animal welfare organizations to address the interrelated problems of woman battering, child maltreatment, and animal abuse. Yet, although the social work literature has recognized the connections between domestic violence and child abuse (e.g., Pulido, 2001; Featherstone & Trinder, 1997), the role of animals in family violence has been ignored. In light of this omission, this article has four purposes: to explain why the link between animal abuse and domestic violence merits the attention of the social work profession, to review the empirical research on the connections between animal abuse and domestic violence, to suggest relevant knowledge and skills that social workers can use to address this issue, and to offer resources for integrating this ...