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Full-Text Articles in Social Work

Economic Well-Being And Intimate Partner Violence: New Findings About The Informal Economy, Loretta Pyles Sep 2006

Economic Well-Being And Intimate Partner Violence: New Findings About The Informal Economy, Loretta Pyles

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The purpose of this research was to explore the relationship between intimatep artnerv iolence (IPV) and women's participationin the informal economy (both legal and illegal) and their impact on economic well-being. This research was part of a National Institute of Justice (NIJ) study that was concerned with women's survival of childhood and adult abuse. For the 285 women that were in this sample, there were positive, medium correlations between IPV and various types of informal economic activity. Illegal informal economic activity, institutionalized informal economic activity, incarceration and physical abuse negatively impacted women's economic well-being.


Filipino-American Perceptions Of And Experiences With Domestic Violence, Bernice Macaraeg Tabil Jan 2006

Filipino-American Perceptions Of And Experiences With Domestic Violence, Bernice Macaraeg Tabil

Theses Digitization Project

The purpose of this research is to assess Filipino Americans' perceptions of and experiences with domestic violence. The Original Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS1) was used to assess participants' experiences with domestic violence.


Family Medicine Physician Residents' Perspectives On Domestic Violence, Christina Marie PeñA Jan 2006

Family Medicine Physician Residents' Perspectives On Domestic Violence, Christina Marie PeñA

Theses Digitization Project

This project surveyed 21 respondents to determine whether family medicine physician assistants' medical education and training while in residency is sufficient to assess or identify domestic violence. The project found that although family medicine physician assistants do receive education and training on domestic violence, it is insufficient because victims may still go undetected and unserved.