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Full-Text Articles in Social Work

The Child As Held In The Mind Of The Mother: The Influence Of Prenatal Maternal Representations On Parenting Behaviors, Carolyn Joy Dayton, Alytia A. Levendosky, William S. Davidson, G. Anne Bogat Mar 2010

The Child As Held In The Mind Of The Mother: The Influence Of Prenatal Maternal Representations On Parenting Behaviors, Carolyn Joy Dayton, Alytia A. Levendosky, William S. Davidson, G. Anne Bogat

Social Work Faculty Publications

Using a longitudinal design, this study examined the relationship of a mother’s prenatal representation of her child and her parenting behavior with that child at one-year-of-age in a sample of women who were either exposed or not exposed to intimate partner violence (IPV) (n = 164; mean child age = 1.1 years, sd = .11 years; 52% male). Controlling for prenatal IPV, a MANCOVA analysis revealed that prenatal representational typology was significantly related to parenting behavior one year post-partum. Mothers whose representations were affectively deactivated (disengaged) were more behaviorally controlling with their children. Mothers whose representations were affectively overactivated (distorted) were ...


Definitions Of Violence: African-American And Iraqi Refugee Adolescents' Perceptions, Beverly M. Black, Barbara L. Peterson, Arlene N. Weisz, Poco D. Kernsmith, Linda A. Lewandowski, Krupa K. Hegde Jan 2009

Definitions Of Violence: African-American And Iraqi Refugee Adolescents' Perceptions, Beverly M. Black, Barbara L. Peterson, Arlene N. Weisz, Poco D. Kernsmith, Linda A. Lewandowski, Krupa K. Hegde

Social Work Faculty Publications

This article explores the perceptions of urban African-American and Iraqi refugee adolescents regarding community violence, school violence, family violence and dating/intimate partner violence. A subset of participants from a larger study on violence and trauma was selected to participate in the current study. Using a card-sort exercise, participants identified situations as violent or not violent. Iraqi youth identified noticeably more behaviors as violence than African-American youth. Few significant gender differences emerged. Findings of important cultural differences provide implications for violence prevention programming.