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Full-Text Articles in Other Political Science

Citizanship In Austria, Germany, And Switzerland, Claus Hofhansel Jun 2011

Citizanship In Austria, Germany, And Switzerland, Claus Hofhansel

Claus Hofhansel

A common claim has been that liberalization of citizenship policy depends on making policy behind closed doors. I challenge one variant of this line of argument, which regards courts as the primary �countermajoritarian� champion of the expansion of immigrant rights, through a comparison of citizenship policy in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland. In all three countries subnational authorities play a significant role in the administration of naturalization policy. Courts have played more of a �nationalizing� rather than a �countermajoritarian� role. I also show how differences in federal structures affected recent efforts to reform citizenship policy in these countries.


Learning Democracy, Claus Hofhansel Jun 2011

Learning Democracy, Claus Hofhansel

Claus Hofhansel

After the initial euphoria over German (re)unification had subsided, it became clear that it would take longer to tear down the mental barriers separating eastern and western Germans than to remove concrete slabs from the Berlin Wall. Studies of German electoral behavior found that eastern and western Germans displayed different voting patterns and that eastern Germans were less supportive of the principles of a market economy and the political institutions of unified Germany than western Germans.


The Harmonization Of Eu Export Control Policies, Claus Hofhansel Jun 2011

The Harmonization Of Eu Export Control Policies, Claus Hofhansel

Claus Hofhansel

This article analyzes efforts to harmonize European Union export control policies on dual-use goods from the perspectives of neofunctionalist and intergovernmentalist theories of European integration. The outcome of the Council negotiations on dual-use export controls can best be characterized as an intergovernmental bargain. Judicial policy making in this area, on the other hand, fits neofunctionalist expectations rather well, and on implementation issues central state executives may be losing their exclusive control. The article concludes by arguing that rather than investing great theoretical significance in differences among issue areas or policy types, it appears more fruitful to recognize the European Union ...