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Voting For Secular Parties In The Middle East: Evidence From The 2014 General Elections In Post-Revolutionary Tunisia, H. Ege Ozen Nov 2018

Voting For Secular Parties In The Middle East: Evidence From The 2014 General Elections In Post-Revolutionary Tunisia, H. Ege Ozen

Publications and Research

Arab uprisings paved the way for democratic elections in the Middle East and

North Africa region. Yet countries in this region, except for Tunisia, were not

able to maintain further democratization. Tunisia, regardless of economic

turbulence and security problems, managed to hold its second parliamentary

elections in October 2014, and Ennahda, the party of the popular Islamist

movement, could not keep mass support. A large number of studies have

examined the rise of the Islamist parties as their electoral success in the post-

Arab Uprisings elections by focusing on their organizational strength as well

as their social services. However, the ...


Media Coverage Of Human Rights In The Us And Uk: The Violations Still Won’T Be Televised (Or Published), Shawna M. Brandle Jan 2018

Media Coverage Of Human Rights In The Us And Uk: The Violations Still Won’T Be Televised (Or Published), Shawna M. Brandle

Publications and Research

This article analyzes American television and American and British print news coverage of human rights using a combination of manual and machine coding. The data reveal that television and print news cover very few human rights stories, that these stories are mostly international and not domestic, that even when human rights are covered, they are not covered in detail, and that human rights issues are more likely to be covered when they are not framed as human rights. This suggests that human rights is simply not a frame that journalists employ, and provides support for government-leading-media theories of newsworthiness.