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Full-Text Articles in Library and Information Science

“87% Missing”: Preserving Video Game History In A Canadian Copyright Context, Amelia Clarkson, Magnus Berg Apr 2024

“87% Missing”: Preserving Video Game History In A Canadian Copyright Context, Amelia Clarkson, Magnus Berg

Digital Initiatives Symposium

In 2020, the University of Toronto Mississauga campus library acquired the largest collection of video games in Canada from prolific collector Syd Bolton, whose vision was for it to not only be preserved but also playable and publicly accessible. Over the past three years, the collections team has been processing the collection to facilitate access onsite, and in 2024 aims to begin the next step of digitally preserving the collection. In the summer of 2023, the Video Game History Foundation and the Software Preservation Network co-authored a report on the dire state of availability of classic games, with the goal …


“Being Cute And Hella Gay:" Pokémon Reborn, Fan Labor, And Queering The Pokémon World, David Peter Kocik May 2020

“Being Cute And Hella Gay:" Pokémon Reborn, Fan Labor, And Queering The Pokémon World, David Peter Kocik

Theses and Dissertations

Created in 2012, Pokémon Reborn is a fan game made by and for queer fans of the Pokémon franchise. Featuring an LGBTQ+ development team and multiple queer characters, from pansexual Rival Cain to gender non-binary Gym Leader Adrienn, Pokémon Reborn articulates queer desires in a franchise and gaming industry notorious for ignoring and dehumanizing queer individuals. While most research on independent queer game development focuses on how creators subvert heteronormative gameplay elements, Pokémon Reborn challenges dominant industry practices through its queer characters and stories. The fan game incorporates LGBTQ+ lived experiences and queer temporalities in its narrative, queering the traditional …


Play Time: Why Video Games Are Essential To Urban Academic Libraries, Christina Boyle Jan 2018

Play Time: Why Video Games Are Essential To Urban Academic Libraries, Christina Boyle

Urban Library Journal

Although there is still some hesitance to accept video games as valuable materials for academic library collections, there is a growing body of research which proves that they are highly beneficial to these institutions. The current conversation indicates that video games are useful to academic libraries, but there are no discussions of their essential role within urban library collections. In this paper, it is my contention that video games are not only advantageous to urban academic libraries, but are indisputably necessary as well. Video games are both effective community builders and catalysts for increased awareness and usage of library sources …


Beyond A Fad: Why Video Games Should Be Part Of 21st Century Libraries, Kym Buchanan, Angela M. Vanden Elzen Jan 2012

Beyond A Fad: Why Video Games Should Be Part Of 21st Century Libraries, Kym Buchanan, Angela M. Vanden Elzen

Library Publications and Presentations

We believe video games have a place in libraries. We start by describing two provocative video games. Next, we offer a framework for the general mission of libraries, including access, motivation, and guidance. As a medium, video games have some distinguishing traits: they are visual, interactive, and based on simulations. We explain how these traits require and reward some traditional and new literacies. Furthermore, people play video games for at least three reasons: immersion, challenge, and connection. Finally, we offer guidelines and examples for how librarians can integrate video games into library collections and programming.