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Full-Text Articles in Library and Information Science

Adapting An Hbcu-Inspired Framework For Black Student Success In U.S. Lis Education, Ana Ndumu, Shaundra Walker Jan 2021

Adapting An Hbcu-Inspired Framework For Black Student Success In U.S. Lis Education, Ana Ndumu, Shaundra Walker

Library Faculty Scholarship

This perspective essay explores Gasman & Arroyo’s (2014) HBCU-inspired framework for Black student success as a prism for re-envisioning LIS education. In response to calls for anti-hegemonic LIS education, the authors discuss a potential tool for Black student success and suggest its benefits to LIS education. The framework can introduce non-white, anti-racist educational practices to the work of educating the U.S. library workforce; it is relevant in light of ongoing racial and political strife in U.S. society.


Factors Influencing Career Routes Of Female Librarianship: A Literature Review, Gulnaz Akhtar Ms, Muhammad Shahid Soroya Dr. Jan 2021

Factors Influencing Career Routes Of Female Librarianship: A Literature Review, Gulnaz Akhtar Ms, Muhammad Shahid Soroya Dr.

Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal)

This research paper aims to understand elements that act as counter-productive to the achievements of females working as professional librarians. The paper uses current literature to explore inhibitive factors for the career development of female librarians. The methodology employed in the paper is epistemological realism and deductive reasoning. This methodology adds to existing knowledge while being linked with realism. The research investigates main factors like cultural stereotyping, discrimination against women, marriage, children, career breaks, mentoring, family support, and organizational structure and policies to ascertain their role in enhancing or diminishing female librarians’ career progression. The nature of research is deductive …


The Academic Library In Society’S Knowledge System: A Case Study Of Tshwane University Of Technology, Mahlaga Molepo Jun 2019

The Academic Library In Society’S Knowledge System: A Case Study Of Tshwane University Of Technology, Mahlaga Molepo

Library Philosophy and Practice (e-journal)

Academic libraries traditionally support the learning, teaching and research activities of universities. However, academic libraries do not operate in vacuum because they are part of the broader society. The purpose of this article is to fill the research gap that exists by focusing on Tshwane University of Technology’s (TUT) libraries’ challenges as a case study, in light of developments in higher education in South Africa and elsewhere in the world.

The article employs a blended method approach that draws on a survey, a focus, interviews, group literature and empirical evidence to build a case study of TUT’s libraries located within …


Problems And Promises Of Qualitative Secondary Analysis For Research In Information Science (Paper), Amy Vanscoy, Jenny Bossaller, C. Sean Burns Jul 2018

Problems And Promises Of Qualitative Secondary Analysis For Research In Information Science (Paper), Amy Vanscoy, Jenny Bossaller, C. Sean Burns

Information Science Faculty Publications

Qualitative secondary analysis (QSA) is a method that has been applied in other disciplines even though it has rarely been explicitly used or discussed in information science. This paper discusses the epistemological and ethical issues surrounding QSA, explains the value of the method for information science research, discusses its benefits and challenges, and provides an example case study.


Toward A Design Epistemology For Librarianship, Rachel I. Clarke Jan 2018

Toward A Design Epistemology For Librarianship, Rachel I. Clarke

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

The design of information tools and services is an integral component of librarianship, yet American librarianship has self-identified as a social science for more than 100 years. This paper suggests an alternative epistemological perspective to the scientific tradition in librarianship: design epistemology. The paper discusses key elements that comprise design epistemology and presents examples of manifestations of these elements in librarianship. Analysis reveals that librarianship has much in common with design epistemology, yet the field lacks explicit acknowledgement of design as a fundamental epistemological framework. The paper concludes with a call for reconceptualizing librarianship as a design discipline.


Data As Stepping Stones In The Research River: Using Data Across Disciplines When You’Re Not A Data Expert, Nina Exner Jan 2018

Data As Stepping Stones In The Research River: Using Data Across Disciplines When You’Re Not A Data Expert, Nina Exner

VCU Libraries Faculty and Staff Presentations

Research – it’s all about discoveries from data! Unfortunately, research development often means encouraging good science and research without being an expert in the data. And as we scale up to working with interdisciplinary teams, even the researchers on the team do not understand each others’ data. Epistemological barriers prevent researchers from good team science. Epistomological silos also provide a barrier to good grantwriting. Developing the general skills to talk data to many types of researchers at many different levels is essential to working with individual PIs in many disciplines. It also supports concrete grantwriting skills such as explaining data …


Nonknowledge: The Bibliographical Organization Of Ignorance, Stupidity, Error, And Unreason: Part One, Jay H. Bernstein Mar 2009

Nonknowledge: The Bibliographical Organization Of Ignorance, Stupidity, Error, And Unreason: Part One, Jay H. Bernstein

Publications and Research

Starting with the Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom paradigm in information science it is possible to derive a model of the opposite of knowledge having hierarchical qualities. A range of counterpoints to concepts in the knowledge hierarchy can be identified and ascribed the overall term “nonknowledge.” This model creates a conceptual framework for understanding the connections between topics such as error, ignorance, stupidity, folly, popular misconceptions, and unreason by locating them as levels or phases of nonknowledge. The concept of nonknowledge links heretofore disconnected discourses on these individual topics by philosophers, psychologists, historians, sociologists, satirists, and others. Subject headings provide access to the categories …