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Library and Information Science Commons

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Faculty Publications

2022

Articles 1 - 25 of 25

Full-Text Articles in Library and Information Science

The User Experience: Student Perspectives On Library Course Reserve, Sara Foster, Duane Wilson, Shannon Sanders, Justin Johnson Nov 2022

The User Experience: Student Perspectives On Library Course Reserve, Sara Foster, Duane Wilson, Shannon Sanders, Justin Johnson

Faculty Publications

A group of researchers from an academic library surveyed students to understand how and why the members of their community use course reserve services. Students were happy with the service and used it as a replacement for purchasing textbooks. Frequent users requested more textbook offerings, and both users and nonusers indicated a need for increased promotion of the service. Users provided specific suggestions for improvement that should be examined. Findings illustrated the value of course reserve services as a way to help students with college affordability and to support instruction and learning.


Burning The Candle At Both Ends: How And Why Academic Librarians Who Are Parents Experience And Combat Burnout At Work, Michael Holt, Amy Chew, Jessica Lee, Robert Taylor Nov 2022

Burning The Candle At Both Ends: How And Why Academic Librarians Who Are Parents Experience And Combat Burnout At Work, Michael Holt, Amy Chew, Jessica Lee, Robert Taylor

Faculty Publications

Academic librarians already wear many hats, juggling a multitude of skills and duties in order to meet the needs of their patrons. When one of those hats is parenthood, however, balancing work and home life can sometimes seem like an insurmountable task. In this chapter we explore how and why academic librarians who are also parents experience burnout, as well as methods used to combat burnout by examining the results of a nationally distributed mixed-methods survey. The survey also addresses practices to combat and prevent burnout, both on a personal and institutional level, and the perceptions of their effectiveness.


Incorporating Diversity, Equity, And Inclusion Principles Into Our Metadata, Nicole Lewis, Allie Mccormack, Rachel Jane Wittmann Oct 2022

Incorporating Diversity, Equity, And Inclusion Principles Into Our Metadata, Nicole Lewis, Allie Mccormack, Rachel Jane Wittmann

Faculty Publications

This presentation was given at the Core Forum 2022 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

In early 2021, a group of librarians at two university libraries embarked on a journey to review and update harmful subject headings and other metadata in their catalog, digital library, and finding aids. This session will discuss the background of the project and where the librarians currently stand in the process of remediating these records, including their efforts to create student internships to address problematic language in archival finding aids as well as create a community user advisory group. Special attention will be given to creating …


Personal Digital Archiving, Jeremy Myntti Oct 2022

Personal Digital Archiving, Jeremy Myntti

Faculty Publications

Jeremy Myntti, Associate University Librarian for Metadata and IT at the Brigham Young University Library, presents on ways you can preserve your digital memories.

Watch the presentation here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNo5W1jRzfs


“Nothing To Do But Be Borne And Steered”: Unpacking Feminist Scripts In Elana Arnold’S Damsel, Jenna Spiering, Nicole Ann Amato Oct 2022

“Nothing To Do But Be Borne And Steered”: Unpacking Feminist Scripts In Elana Arnold’S Damsel, Jenna Spiering, Nicole Ann Amato

Faculty Publications

Feminism in novels marketed for young adults often reflects the values of a popular feminism that relies on individual and personal means of empowerment, rather than critiquing or seeking to dismantle systems of domination. In this paper, we illumminate frameworks and methods for engaging students in careful readings and evaluations of texts marketed as feminist, through an analysis of Elana Arnold’s feminist fairy tale, Damsel (2018). Drawing on theoretical frameworks of popular feminism, feral feminism, and theories of becoming, the authors use Critical Content Anlaysis to explore several tenets in contemporary feminist thought in order to analyze Arnold’s text and …


James White Library: A History, Meredith Jones Gray Sep 2022

James White Library: A History, Meredith Jones Gray

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


James White Library Celebrates The 85th Anniversary, Margaret Adeogun Sep 2022

James White Library Celebrates The 85th Anniversary, Margaret Adeogun

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Optical Character Recognition (Ocr) Approaches To Cursive Handwriting Transcription: Lessons From The Blythe Owen Letters Project, Jazmyne Lavalas, Marianne Kordas, Rodney Summerscales Sep 2022

Optical Character Recognition (Ocr) Approaches To Cursive Handwriting Transcription: Lessons From The Blythe Owen Letters Project, Jazmyne Lavalas, Marianne Kordas, Rodney Summerscales

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Using Student Researchers To Assess The Digital Collections User Experience, Rebecca A. Wiederhold, Lindsey Memory, Jonathan Jarvis, Greg Seppi, Madeleine Meldrum, Hannah Bozue Jun 2022

Using Student Researchers To Assess The Digital Collections User Experience, Rebecca A. Wiederhold, Lindsey Memory, Jonathan Jarvis, Greg Seppi, Madeleine Meldrum, Hannah Bozue

Faculty Publications

Following the closure of the Harold B. Lee Library’s special collections during the pandemic, the presenters designed a study to assess the usability of our CONTENTdm system. The library collaborated with a sociology professor to have students from his qualitative research methods class administer the study, observing other undergraduates using the system to perform tasks, and interviewing them about their experiences. In this presentation, the librarians, the sociology professor, and two students will share lessons learned from this experience, including small disappointments and unexpected benefits. We’ll also share the study methodology and suggestions for optimizing this type of professional collaboration …


In Their Own Words: Perspectives On Collection Weeding From Library Employees And Teaching Faculty, Dan Broadbent, Megan Frost, Gregory M. Nelson, David Pixton Jun 2022

In Their Own Words: Perspectives On Collection Weeding From Library Employees And Teaching Faculty, Dan Broadbent, Megan Frost, Gregory M. Nelson, David Pixton

Faculty Publications

Following a Science and Engineering collection weeding project of over 350,000 print items, our research team conducted interviews with 20 library employees and 19 teaching faculty involved in the project. The purpose of the interviews was to assess the interviewees’ perspectives and feelings relating to the time required to complete the project, inter- and intra- library communication, the decision-making processes, and their personal assessment of the costs and benefits of the project. The interviewees also offered their views of the overall project’s successes and areas for improvement. Drawing from a qualitative analysis of the interviews, we provide guidance for other …


Cataloging Conundrums: Challenging Items That Have Crossed Our Desks, Rebecca A. Wiederhold, Sharolyn Swenson, Kjerste Christensen, Jessie Louise Christensen May 2022

Cataloging Conundrums: Challenging Items That Have Crossed Our Desks, Rebecca A. Wiederhold, Sharolyn Swenson, Kjerste Christensen, Jessie Louise Christensen

Faculty Publications

Some of the most interesting items that cross the cataloger’s desk present difficult cataloging challenges. When cataloging a collection of suspected forgeries, how do you determine the “publication” date for faked documents? Which cataloging workform do you use for a LEGO model of the Salt Lake Temple? Is it a kit? A game? A sculpture? In this session, we will share examples of unique items we’ve cataloged and demonstrate how to effectively solve the questions that come up when trying to help patrons discover exactly what they’re looking for.


Incorporating Inclusivity In Our Catalog, Nicole Lewis, Rachel Jane Wittmann May 2022

Incorporating Inclusivity In Our Catalog, Nicole Lewis, Rachel Jane Wittmann

Faculty Publications

This presentation was given at the Utah Library Association Annual Conference in Layton, Utah.

In early 2021, the University of Utah embarked on the journey to review and update harmful subject headings in their catalog, digital library metadata, and finding aids. This session will discuss the background of the project and where we are currently at in the process of changing harmful subject headings.


Marcedit For Beginners, Nicole Lewis May 2022

Marcedit For Beginners, Nicole Lewis

Faculty Publications

This presentation was given at the Utah Library Association Annual Conference 2022 in Layton, Utah.

MarcEdit is a powerful - and free - tool available for editing, enhancing, and transforming MARC21 data. This workshop-style session will present the variety of editing options available in MarcEdit, as well as possible use cases. Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop with the latest version of MarcEdit installed for hands-on use of the program.


University Archives And Etds: Exploring Best Practices, Cory L. Nimer, Rebecca A. Wiederhold May 2022

University Archives And Etds: Exploring Best Practices, Cory L. Nimer, Rebecca A. Wiederhold

Faculty Publications

This poster reports on a preliminary study of current best practices for the management of theses and dissertations (TD) by university archivists in the United States. This will include procedural concerns, such as the maintenance of print copies, digital preservation, microfilming, and participation in external databases of TDs. It also begins to explore the relationships between university archives programs and institutional repositories in electronic TD submission/management, and the status of theses and dissertations as student records.


Assessing Our Digital Asset Management System (Contentdm) From The Undergraduate Patron Perspective, Lindsey Memory, Abby Beazer, Rebecca A. Wiederhold, Brent Ellingson May 2022

Assessing Our Digital Asset Management System (Contentdm) From The Undergraduate Patron Perspective, Lindsey Memory, Abby Beazer, Rebecca A. Wiederhold, Brent Ellingson

Faculty Publications

COVID underscored the desire of the student population to access library and special collections materials online. After two decades of hosting BYU’s digitized content in the digital asset management system CONTENTdm, we decided in summer 2021 to evaluate its interface for ease of use and reliability. We wanted to determine how our system was performing for an undergraduate population specifically, and to understand the typical undergraduate students’ experience searching for and accessing digitized materials. Our study involved the use of Gen-Z student researchers, who observed undergraduate patrons via a Zoom screenshare. These patrons performed a variety of user tasks and …


Byu Scholarsarchive Open Access Journals, Ellen Amatangelo May 2022

Byu Scholarsarchive Open Access Journals, Ellen Amatangelo

Faculty Publications

Brigham Young University's institutional repository, ScholarsArchive, is currently home to over 40 Open Access scholarly journals run by faculty, students, and societies. This presentation will highlight some of the journals' features, explore how the library's Scholarly Communications team works with editors, discuss the requirements for having a journal housed in the repository, and examine readership statistics and discoverability.

Learning objectives:
Learn more about the process of managing online journals
Tips for working with journal editors


Increasing Patron’S Outreach And Engagement Through Relationship Marketing: A Case Study, Margaret Adeogun Mar 2022

Increasing Patron’S Outreach And Engagement Through Relationship Marketing: A Case Study, Margaret Adeogun

Faculty Publications

Increased diversity, demographics, and population shifts in higher education have led many academic libraries to reexamine their marketing efforts and adopt strategies that promote relationships and inclusivity. This requirement has become more prominent among libraries serving a highly diverse user community, particularly in a more racially and ethnically diverse campus. Adopting a marketing model that cultivates more meaningful long-term relationships with customers ensures long-term satisfaction and loyalty to the library brand. Using marketing and promotional examples from the James White Library, this article addresses the academic library’s relationship marketing strategy in an increasingly multicultural higher education environment.


Including Latinx Communities In Academic Libraries: A Theoretical Approach To Information Access, Andrew A. Wakelee, Kim M. Thompson Mar 2022

Including Latinx Communities In Academic Libraries: A Theoretical Approach To Information Access, Andrew A. Wakelee, Kim M. Thompson

Faculty Publications

While more Latinx students continue to enroll in higher education, physical, intellectual, and socio-cultural barriers to information may continue to impede their success and inclusion. A tripartite theoretical model that examines physical, intellectual, and socio-cultural information access provides insights for academic libraries to better meet Latinx students’ information needs and include them in campus life. This paper gives an overview of the theoretical framework along with practical steps libraries can take to improve information equity.


Keynote Address: Curating The History Of Covid-19, Jeremy Myntti Feb 2022

Keynote Address: Curating The History Of Covid-19, Jeremy Myntti

Faculty Publications

Many libraries and archives have a mission to document local or regional history and current events. Rapid response collecting during a crisis has become increasingly necessary in recent years in order to curate content during an event rather than after the event has concluded. When the COVID-19 pandemic hit in early 2020, libraries across the world recognized the importance of documenting contemporary history for the current and future study of the pandemic. Many projects were created to document different aspects of the pandemic, each with a slightly different focus based on types of content, populations, or regions. This talk will …


Libraries In The Doughnut Economy, Monika Antonelli, Rene Tanner, Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Adrian K. Ho Jan 2022

Libraries In The Doughnut Economy, Monika Antonelli, Rene Tanner, Rebekkah Smith Aldrich, Adrian K. Ho

Faculty Publications

This chapter unpacks the principles behind Doughnut Economics and explains how libraries can lead a long overdue social transition by incorporating the principles into their policies and operations. The actualization of Doughnut Economics will bring about a positive transformation of people’s behavior, which in turn will shift the focus of the economy from unfettered growth and opportunistic monetization to the well-being of people and biodiversity on the planet. In addition, libraries can help facilitate a redistribution of wealth in its various forms by supporting and promoting knowledge sharing. The chapter concludes with a discussion of five simple acts that drive …


Pieces Of The Whole: Using The Research Process To Integrate Data Management And Information Literacy Skills, Patricia Condon, Megan Bresnahan, Eugenia Opuda Jan 2022

Pieces Of The Whole: Using The Research Process To Integrate Data Management And Information Literacy Skills, Patricia Condon, Megan Bresnahan, Eugenia Opuda

Faculty Publications

The research process is naturally embraced as part of the academic curriculum in higher education. Graduate students write theses and dissertations based on their original scholarships, undergraduate stu­dents produce papers for courses and work in labs or in the field, and both participate in faculty-led research projects. The research process is tack­led holistically through coursework, yet when library instructors are invited to teach students about information literacy and research data management topics, these may be presented as tangential to or mistimed with other course content and learning activities. In this chapter, the authors present a com­prehensive, student-centered model for teaching …


Advancing Data Literacy: Mapping Business Data Literacy Competencies To The Acrl Framework, Patricia B. Condon, Wendy G. Pothier Jan 2022

Advancing Data Literacy: Mapping Business Data Literacy Competencies To The Acrl Framework, Patricia B. Condon, Wendy G. Pothier

Faculty Publications

The relationship between data literacy and business librarianship continues to grow in relevance as the conversation intensifies in higher education and the business world. Establishing shared vocabularies and mappings to foundational library professional documents is essential to moving the discourse forward. This article presents a mapping between seven baseline business data literacy competencies and the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education.


Genealogy Behind Bars: An Update, Kathrine C. Aydelott Jan 2022

Genealogy Behind Bars: An Update, Kathrine C. Aydelott

Faculty Publications

This brief essay is an update to “Genealogy Behind Bars: Professional Development Through Prisoner Requests: A Case Study,” in Genealogy and the Librarian: Perspectives on Research, Instruction, Outreach and Management, Carol Smallwood and Vera Gubnitskaia, eds. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2018, which see for context.


Book Review: Transforming Print: Collection Development And Management For Our Connected Future, Debra Andreadis Jan 2022

Book Review: Transforming Print: Collection Development And Management For Our Connected Future, Debra Andreadis

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


"Making It Happen": Building Relational Teaching Into The Online World Of Covid-19, Carol A. Leibiger, Alan W. Aldrich Jan 2022

"Making It Happen": Building Relational Teaching Into The Online World Of Covid-19, Carol A. Leibiger, Alan W. Aldrich

Faculty Publications

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic required shifting information literacy instruction from face-to-face to online formats at the University Libraries of the University of South Dakota. This case study narrates how the instructional team there introduced innovations into a Freshman Writing course that enabled instrumental (that is, goal-oriented) and relational teaching in the online-only environment. The team applied social network theory and a disaster response model to plan and analyze their innovations. The affordances of the Zoom video conferencing platform and the embedded librarian model enabled them to expand their information literacy instruction to include online students for the first …