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Articles 1 - 30 of 133

Full-Text Articles in Speech and Rhetorical Studies

Perception, Production, And Perception-Production: Research Findings And Implications For Language Pedagogy, Charles Nagle Aug 2018

Perception, Production, And Perception-Production: Research Findings And Implications For Language Pedagogy, Charles Nagle

World Languages and Cultures Publications

When we are born our perceptual systems are capable of discriminating sounds that occur in English, Spanish, Hindi, or any other language. During the first year, our perception begins to zero in on the particular set of sounds that are contrastive in our native language(s) (L1s) (Kuhl et al., 2006). For example, a child whose parents are L1 English speakers will pick up on the fact that /b/ and /p/ are contrastive in English (e.g., “bet” vs. “pet”) and that the major difference is in the burst of air that occurs when the stop is released (i.e ...


Pronunciationforteachers.Com/ Key Concepts Factors Affecting Pronunciation Development, Charles Nagle Aug 2018

Pronunciationforteachers.Com/ Key Concepts Factors Affecting Pronunciation Development, Charles Nagle

World Languages and Cultures Publications

As Derwing (2010) observed nearly ten years ago, one of the goals of pronunciation research is to identify how different aspects of second language (L2) speech develop over time, providing teachers with information on the pronunciation problems that will work themselves out, versus those that will likely pose an ongoing challenge. At the same time, research must account for the cognitive, socio-affective, and experiential variables that shape pronunciation learning outcomes (Moyer, 2014a, 2014b).


They’Re Smart, But You Can’T Trust Them: Using Communication Principles To Help Scientists To Increase Their Trustworthiness In Public Communication Situations, Rachel Murdock Jan 2018

They’Re Smart, But You Can’T Trust Them: Using Communication Principles To Help Scientists To Increase Their Trustworthiness In Public Communication Situations, Rachel Murdock

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Scientists struggle with creating positive public perceptions with public audiences. This is true despite the generally positive view members of the public hold for science and scientists, including a positive view of the contributions of scientists to society. In fact, members of the public feel separated from scientists, stand in awe of scientists, and are intimidated by scientists (Jacobs, 2011). Rhetoricians and communication scholars can help, as they have been grappling with and refining ways of building trustworthiness, respect, credibility, and connection between speakers and their audiences for centuries, and the communication principles developed through their work are particularly applicable ...


Who Isn’T Biased? Perceived Bias As A Dimension Of Credibility In Communication Of Science With Policymakers, Karen Akerlof, Maria Carmen Lemos, Emily Therese Cloyd, Erin Heath Jan 2018

Who Isn’T Biased? Perceived Bias As A Dimension Of Credibility In Communication Of Science With Policymakers, Karen Akerlof, Maria Carmen Lemos, Emily Therese Cloyd, Erin Heath

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Identifying the determinants of success in communicating scientific information for use in policymaking has been a topic of longstanding interest for many fields. Perceptions of message and messenger credibility are recognized in many disciplines as key to information receptivity, and subsequent changes in attitudes, by decision-makers. Bias also appears as a component of credibility, but is not theoretically well-defined, and its effects can appear inconsistent. This study—comprised of interviews with congressional staff members with energy, environment, and science portfolios (n=16)—finds that perceptions of bias and expertise play a critical role in the way in which policymakers evaluate ...


Encore: Intermediate French, Wynne Wong, Stacey Weber-Fève, Anne Lair, Bill Van Patten Jan 2018

Encore: Intermediate French, Wynne Wong, Stacey Weber-Fève, Anne Lair, Bill Van Patten

World Languages and Cultures Books

ENCORE is an intermediate-level proficiency- and communicative-oriented program. Paired with an engaging mystery and suspense film of the same name, ENCORE is guided by principles of communicative language teaching and research in second language acquisition. Topics and activities are designed to engage students in higher-level thinking while at the same time providing focused work on aspects of language that instructors in a second-year college-level French course expect to find.


Representation, Resistance, And Rhetoric: Bananas Catalyze Campus Activism, Abby M. Dubisar, Gabrielle E. Roesch-Mcnally Jan 2018

Representation, Resistance, And Rhetoric: Bananas Catalyze Campus Activism, Abby M. Dubisar, Gabrielle E. Roesch-Mcnally

English Publications

Examining food and agricultural systems cultivates nuanced understandings of rhetoric, campus activism, and cultural and scientific meanings of food. At Iowa State University, the banana has provoked discussions regarding biotechnology—prompting debates with competing narratives about food and agricultural systems. Because of its status as a genetically modified food (developed in campus food sciences and human nutrition labs and purportedly able to address hunger and malnutrition in the Global South), this particular biotech banana prompted reactions from sustainable agriculture students with social and ecological justice concerns. For those working at land grant universities conducting food and agriculture research especially, teaching ...


Teaching High-Value Pronunciation Features: Contrastive Stress For Intermediate Learners, John M. Levis, Greta M. Levis Jan 2018

Teaching High-Value Pronunciation Features: Contrastive Stress For Intermediate Learners, John M. Levis, Greta M. Levis

English Publications

Pronunciation features are not equal in how they affect listeners’ ability to understand. Some are low value, while others are high value. This study explores whether contrastive stress is high value. Previous research has shown that identification of contrastive stress is learnable (Pennington & Ellis, 2000), and that explicit teaching about contrastive stress patterns can improve production for advanced learners (Hahn, 2002; Muller Levis & Levis, 2012). To test whether instruction on contrastive stress improved comprehensibility and fluency in spontaneous speech, we developed a 3-week class for intermediate ESL learners, whose pre- and posttest productions were rated by native listeners. Ratings for fluency showed no improvement. Ratings for comprehensibility significantly improved for the experimental group while control participants showed no ...


Objecting To Models: A Typology Of Non-Experts’ Critiques Of Models Of Human-Natural Systems, Jean Goodwin Jan 2016

Objecting To Models: A Typology Of Non-Experts’ Critiques Of Models Of Human-Natural Systems, Jean Goodwin

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Cooperation between scientists and local stakeholders on building models requires scientists to listen to lay objections. This paper develops a typology of objections based on discourse analysis of a participatory modeling exercise examining causes and potential solutions to flooding in a Midwest watershed. Four principle objections are examined, together with ways scientists can address them.


Citizen Science: Evaluating For Civic Engagement, Nancy Grudens-Schuck, Zulham Sirajuddin Jan 2016

Citizen Science: Evaluating For Civic Engagement, Nancy Grudens-Schuck, Zulham Sirajuddin

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Citizen science programs directly engage the public in collecting data for science-related projects. This paper will investigate the claim that citizen science programs deliver opportunities and outcomes for a specific kind of benefit, “civic engagement.” The paper will identify specific behaviors and conditions that have been used as indicators of citizen engagement in citizen science and discuss probable theoretical bases. Second, the paper will report on progress of an empirical study (a program evaluation) conducted in spring of 2016 of the Iowater Program, a citizen science program managed by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, which has trained over 5 ...


The Radical Potential Of Public Hearings: A Rhetorical Assessment Of Resistance And Indecorous Voice In Public Participation Processes, Kathleen P. Hunt, Nicholas Paliewicz, Danielle Endres Jan 2016

The Radical Potential Of Public Hearings: A Rhetorical Assessment Of Resistance And Indecorous Voice In Public Participation Processes, Kathleen P. Hunt, Nicholas Paliewicz, Danielle Endres

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Little scholarship in environmental communication has considered the intersections between public participation and social movement. We fill this gap by discussing how public participation process can become sites of radical politics when publics employ disruptive or improper tactics, known as indecorous voice. Indecorum can be used to sustain protest matters beyond official forums, engage multiple audiences, and forge new identities among publics. We demonstrate the utility of indecorum through two case studies: Love Canal, NY where residents combat exposure to toxic chemicals, and Salt Lake City, UT, where publics challenge industrial expansion in a fight for clean air.


Speaking Of Place, Colene J. Lind Jan 2016

Speaking Of Place, Colene J. Lind

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Environmental communicators highlight the importance of local voices and concerns in naturalresource planning, but others argue that the provincialism of place-based discourse can undermine the common good. How do participants speak of place in a public process and to what end? To answer these question, the author analyzed transcripts from thirty public discussions on water use. Findings indicated a discrete orientation toward the environment, as people compared one place to another and failed to mention natural or social connections between locales. The author suggests ways to improve public participation in light of the findings.


Expertise And Self-Determination In Public Participation In Science, Scott Tanona Jan 2016

Expertise And Self-Determination In Public Participation In Science, Scott Tanona

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

I suggest that we assess the value of public participation at least partly by its effect on the public’s individual and collective self-determination, measured by how well the science aids the public to rationally and effectively pursue its own ends. I explore two areas of expertise relevant to science’s ability to foster rational, effective self-determination: expertise in evidential reasoning and expertise in value identification. I describe ways in which public participation may introduce trade-offs between accurate reflection of public values and evidential quality and precision, where loss of either may lead to a failure of public self-determination.


Transmedating Nest: Building A Habitat For Ecological Storymaking, Tyler Quiring Jan 2016

Transmedating Nest: Building A Habitat For Ecological Storymaking, Tyler Quiring

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Transmedia storytelling can enhance creative public participation collaborations. I overview the emergence of integrated transmedia storytelling and reflect on examples that illustrate its narrative and critical contributions to public participation. I also provide a case study of my own applied project, a website called Safe Beaches, Shellfish, & You that uses transmedia to engage collaborators in communication about and for environments. Finally, I argue that transmedia is more a process of storymaking than storytelling, and that mindful and ethically engaged transmedia storymaking meets the needs of both researchers and stakeholders connected through sustainability science.


Keynote Address—Rethinking Public Participation: The Case Of Public Land Management, Matthew Mckinney Jan 2016

Keynote Address—Rethinking Public Participation: The Case Of Public Land Management, Matthew Mckinney

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

I would like to build on many of the previous and ongoing conversations by suggesting that it’s time to rethink our concepts and approaches to public participation—particularly those related to natural resources policy—and more specifically federal public land management.


Getting To Action On Issues Of Gender Equality In China: From Participatory Training To Government Officials’ Participating In Change Behavior, Wenjuan Bi Jan 2016

Getting To Action On Issues Of Gender Equality In China: From Participatory Training To Government Officials’ Participating In Change Behavior, Wenjuan Bi

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Although the central government of China published the Law on the Protection of Women's Rights and Interests in 1992 and refined it in 2005, gender equality is still an issue on which the local governments has taken little action because of a lack of operational and technical guidance in legal practices. This paper focuses on analysis of effectiveness of participatory trainings of governmental officials aimed at increasing skill levels in using a gender perspective to intervene in domestic violence situations and mediate non-violent family conflicts. The evaluation results suggest the trainings received highly positive feedback from participants across the ...


Advancing Practical Theory In Environmental Communication: A Phronetic Analysis Of Environmental Communication In New Zealand, Giles Dodson, Anna Palliser Jan 2016

Advancing Practical Theory In Environmental Communication: A Phronetic Analysis Of Environmental Communication In New Zealand, Giles Dodson, Anna Palliser

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Despite widespread support of collaborative and participatory approaches to environmental management internationally, understandings of such approaches are frequently simplistic and even idealised (McCallum, Hughey and Rixecker, 2007). The uncertain implementation of such approaches is especially relevant in the New Zealand context, where indigenous Māori communities have a deep connection to natural resources and a long history of grievances about being excluded from their management. This chapter uses the phronetic social science of Flyvbjerg (1998, 2001) as an analytical tool for analysing two case studies of recent participatory environmental management initiatives in New Zealand. The insights generated by the phronetic approach ...


Adapting To Conflict: Rhetorical Refusals Of Scientific Publication Norms, Adrienne P. Lamberti Jan 2016

Adapting To Conflict: Rhetorical Refusals Of Scientific Publication Norms, Adrienne P. Lamberti

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

In the early decades of the 21st century, the central role of technical writing to organizational communication during crisis and conflict events is becoming increasingly apparent. Meanwhile, the documentation involved when currently publishing studies of such communication suggests a negotiation site for expectations and genre conventions within scientific discourse.


Scientists As Audience: Science Communicators As Mediators Of Wicked Problems, Katherine R. Mckiernan, Andra Steinbergs Jan 2016

Scientists As Audience: Science Communicators As Mediators Of Wicked Problems, Katherine R. Mckiernan, Andra Steinbergs

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Important intersections of science and public policy are often wicked problems that require bringing together information from multiple stakeholders with different worldviews. Taming wicked problems is facilitated by fostering trust and collaboration. To better tame these problems, we suggest conceptualizing scientists as an underserved audience for public-originating information, and propose a role for science communicators to speak to scientists. We offer some potential considerations for understanding scientists as audience for science communicators in such a role.


Agency Theory: Toward A Framework For Research In The Public’S Support For And Understanding Of Science, Peter Muhlberger, Lisa Pytlik-Zillig Jan 2016

Agency Theory: Toward A Framework For Research In The Public’S Support For And Understanding Of Science, Peter Muhlberger, Lisa Pytlik-Zillig

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Public understanding of science and public engagement around science policy issues takes place within a complex system involving public opinion, values, identities, social groups, media, and social, economic, and political structures and influences. This paper offers a theory of agency that bridges the psychological and sociological and thereby offers a theoretical framework for understanding the system underlying public understanding of science, support for science, and the implications of public engagement. Agency theory integrates elements of well-established social science theories into an understanding of human agency. Strategies for improved public engagement are discussed.


Deliberative Privilege, Sally French Paulson Jan 2016

Deliberative Privilege, Sally French Paulson

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

The concept of deliberative privilege poses a true threat to maintaining public involvement in public policy decision-making. The threat arises from the very nature of privileges themselves. They sacrifice individual interests in the interest of a larger public good. Unfortunately, deliberative privilege sacrifices such interests as ensuring justice for the individual and public participation. However, a way exists to overcome the threats the privilege establishes – characterize criteria as facts and thus discoverable and open to public scrutiny. Just knowing the criteria upon which public administrators base their decisions could give the public confidence in those administrators and their policies.


Cultural Discourses Of Public Engagement: Insights For Energy System Transformation, Lydia Reinig, Leah Sprain Jan 2016

Cultural Discourses Of Public Engagement: Insights For Energy System Transformation, Lydia Reinig, Leah Sprain

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Our case study explores the public’s roles in energy transition by examining public participation processes and their meanings in Boulder’s Energy Future. Drawing on Cultural Discourse Analysis (Carbaugh, 2007b) as an analytical framework, we investigate discourses of public participation active in city council meetings as resources for generating insights about how to design more meaningful engagement practices. Our analysis traces meanings attached to attending and speaking at city council meetings, emailing council, outreach and education efforts, task force service, and voting. These practices and meanings provide insights for designing future public participation as well as theorizing public participation ...


Engaged Science And Working With Youth For Sustainable Cities: A Partnership Between “East High Cares” And An Iowa State University Research Team, Linda Shenk, Nadia Anderson, Ulrike Passe, Caroline Krejci Jan 2016

Engaged Science And Working With Youth For Sustainable Cities: A Partnership Between “East High Cares” And An Iowa State University Research Team, Linda Shenk, Nadia Anderson, Ulrike Passe, Caroline Krejci

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Integrating the voices of youth into city and neighborhood decision-making and scientific research is crucial for developing forward-thinking approaches for creating sustainable cities. In our pilot project, we partner with the high school group East High Cares, empowering them to lead community dialogue around issues of urban agriculture and energy-efficient homes. This paper will share our reasons for partnering with these youth, how working with them shapes our multi-disciplinary methods, and how we will integrate this work with the datadriven urban energy and microclimate simulation tools our research team is developing for sustainable city decision-making.


Health, The Environment, And Sustainability: Emergent Communication Lessons Across Highly Diverse Public Participation Activities, Linda Silka, Bridie Mcgreavy, David Hart Jan 2016

Health, The Environment, And Sustainability: Emergent Communication Lessons Across Highly Diverse Public Participation Activities, Linda Silka, Bridie Mcgreavy, David Hart

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Most lessons about public participation are gleaned from very specific domains, yet innovative ideas often emerge when lessons across very different domains are brought together. Our public engagement efforts span health, the environment, and sustainability in rural and urban settings with long term residents as well as new immigrants. We have worked with hundreds of faculty and stakeholders in Maine, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire on topics as varied as immigrant fishing in contaminated water, shared governance of shellfish areas, remediation of lead contamination in urban areas, and shared decision making on dam removal. The diversity of these efforts offers lessons ...


Bridging Power Asymmetries In Facilitating Public Participation, Zulham Sirajuddin, Nancy Grudens-Schuck Jan 2016

Bridging Power Asymmetries In Facilitating Public Participation, Zulham Sirajuddin, Nancy Grudens-Schuck

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Participatory approaches to community development and environmental management frequently cause facilitators to encounter dilemmas related to the structure and choice of methods. Because participation does not occur in power vacuum but rather as embedded social and power structures which potentially interfere, these dilemmas underscore the importance of better facilitation structures and techniques to mediate the complexity of disagreements. This paper will review the literature on selecting and applying facilitation methods in Asia, focused on South and Southeast Asia. The analysis includes critical elements for involving marginalized communities in participatory approaches.


Communicative Space And The Maritime Agora, Chui-Ling Tam Jan 2016

Communicative Space And The Maritime Agora, Chui-Ling Tam

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Deliberative participation is a popular strategy in contested spaces such as fisheries and marine protected areas. However, in Indonesia, maritime dwellers share stories in spaces unbounded by the moment that new spatial imaginaries or participatory decision-making processes emerge. Such communicative spaces form a maritime agora of backrooms and thoroughfares where knowledge and lived experience are discussed and performed. This reveals three insights. First, communication chaos and disorder are intrinsic to informal participation. Second, thoroughfares should be viewed not as temporary passing spaces but as habitual timespaces of engagement. And third, the boundaries between public and private communicative space are elastic.


Rare’S Conservation Campaigns: Community Decision Making And Public Participation For Behavioral Change In Indonesia, China, And Latin America, Sarah D. Upton, Carlos A. Tarin, Stacey K. Sowards, Kenneth C. C. Yang Jan 2016

Rare’S Conservation Campaigns: Community Decision Making And Public Participation For Behavioral Change In Indonesia, China, And Latin America, Sarah D. Upton, Carlos A. Tarin, Stacey K. Sowards, Kenneth C. C. Yang

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

In this chapter we explore the ways in which Rare, an international non-profit organization, uses institutional, practical, and local knowledge as a symbolic resource to create environmental change. Rare’s approach involves identifying human behaviors that cause threats to biodiversity, using social science research to identify community-based and public participation solutions to change these behaviors, launching a Pride campaign designed to instill pride within a local community and to facilitate the removal of barriers to conservation, and adapting conservation solutions on a broader scale. Such an approach enables Rare and its campaign managers to draw on expertise from all kinds ...


Understanding The Influence Of Power And Perspective-Taking On Collaborative Decision-Making, Dara M. Wald, Elizabeth A. Segal, Erik W. Johnston, Ajay Vinze Jan 2016

Understanding The Influence Of Power And Perspective-Taking On Collaborative Decision-Making, Dara M. Wald, Elizabeth A. Segal, Erik W. Johnston, Ajay Vinze

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

Public engagement in collaborative natural resource management necessitates perspective taking, shared understanding, and collaboration. There is currently little understanding about how to reliably generate perspective-taking and collaboration, particularly in situations involving the unequal distribution of resources. Here we examine how using a computer-mediated scenario to simulate resource gain and loss influenced individual perspective-taking and behavior. Participants (n=180) were randomly assigned to each condition: high resources, low resources, lose resources, gain resources. Multilevel analysis revealed that losing resources decreased perspective-taking and collaboration. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of this research for public engagement in environmental decisions.


Barriers To Museums’ Informal Efforts To Facilitate Public Engagement With Science, Judith Mcintosh White Jan 2016

Barriers To Museums’ Informal Efforts To Facilitate Public Engagement With Science, Judith Mcintosh White

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

This project embodies the author’s response to Alan Irwin’s essay (2014) calling for social scientists to “exercise greater imagination in helping foster a culture of experimentation in citizens’ responses to scientific fact and policy, thus acting to pluralize practice and offer ways of thinking that embrace different levels and ways of knowing”. In particular, this research focuses on museums as sites of public engagement with science through their participatory curricula. The author believes such curricula hold potential for building lay leadership skills by educating members of the public to employ mechanisms necessary to facilitate a type of deliberative ...


Twitter Chats And Public Engagement: Examining Concern And Critique In Questions About The Ebola Epidemic, Rachel Young, Kajsa E. Dalrymple, Melissa Tully Jan 2016

Twitter Chats And Public Engagement: Examining Concern And Critique In Questions About The Ebola Epidemic, Rachel Young, Kajsa E. Dalrymple, Melissa Tully

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

A thematic analysis of three Twitter chats hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak suggests that public questions addressed by the CDC focused on reducing uncertainty about disease transmission and clarifying protocol. Negative comments about CDC practices and transparency presented an opportunity for the organization to address criticism in a controlled online space.


Frankenbug Meets The Conch Republic: Engagement, Expertise, And “Strategic Irrationality” In Public Scientific Controversies, Tanya Zarlengo Jan 2016

Frankenbug Meets The Conch Republic: Engagement, Expertise, And “Strategic Irrationality” In Public Scientific Controversies, Tanya Zarlengo

Iowa State University Summer Symposium on Science Communication

This paper develops a case study of the controversy surrounding release of genetically modified mosquitos in the Florida Keys to explore escalated conflicts between stakeholders who perceive themselves to be equally empowered and, therefore, justified in dominating public deliberations and policy decisions. The antagonistic discourse that characterizes the Keys controversy may be understood as a power struggle in which both the citizen-scientists and scientist-citizens wrestle for the same intellectual and jurisdictional turf. A description of this dynamic extends the discussion of asymmetrical institutional and social power relations to explicate the concept of “strategic irrationality” as a means of disrupting productive ...