Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Review

Louise D'Arcens

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Book Review - Theresa Coletti: Mary Magdalene And The Drama Of Saints: Theater, Gender, And Religion In Late Medieval England, Louise D'Arcens Nov 2011

Book Review - Theresa Coletti: Mary Magdalene And The Drama Of Saints: Theater, Gender, And Religion In Late Medieval England, Louise D'Arcens

Louise D'Arcens

Theresa Coletti’s Mary Magdalene and the Drama of Saints is a persuasively argued and rigorously researched study that examines the late medieval English career of medieval Christianity’s “other Mary.” Coletti argues for the significance of the figure of Mary Magdalene within traditions of medieval insular piety dating back to Bede, and more specifically within vernacular East Anglian culture of the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Taking as her main focus the early sixteenthcentury Digby saint play Mary Magdalene, Coletti succeeds in demonstrating the many striking ways in which “late medieval East Anglia’s feminine religious culture and commitment ...


Book Review - Kate Langdon Forhan, The Political Theory Of Christine De Pizan, Louise D'Arcens Nov 2011

Book Review - Kate Langdon Forhan, The Political Theory Of Christine De Pizan, Louise D'Arcens

Louise D'Arcens

Christine de Pizan scholars are familiar with Kate Langdon Forhan’s many valuable contributions to the growing research into Christine’s political writings. In The Political Theory of Christine de Pizan Forhan seeks to bring Christine’s work to the attention of a new audience, political theorists, in order to ensure a place for her within the mainstream history of political theory. In so doing she continues the worthy task already underway in her translation of Christine’s Book of the Body Politic for Cambridge’s Texts in the History of Political Thought series, and her Medieval Political Theory reader ...


Review Of Women In The Middle Ages: An Encyclopedia, 2 Vols, Louise D'Arcens Nov 2011

Review Of Women In The Middle Ages: An Encyclopedia, 2 Vols, Louise D'Arcens

Louise D'Arcens

At the 2003 International Congress at Leeds, a panel posed the question of whether feminist medieval studies can be said today to be "pressing or passé." Far from signalling the obsolescence of feminist investigations into the Middle Ages, the posing of such a question reflects the extent to which feminist scholarship, and in particular the study of medieval women, has consolidated its position within the larger field of Medieval Studies. Similarly, the appearance of a watershed resource such as Women in the Middle Ages: An Encyclopedia is a clear sign not of only how far scholarship on medieval women has ...


Book Review, Richard Utz And Tom Shippey (Eds), Medievalism And The Modern World: Essays In Honour Of Leslie Workman, Louise D'Arcens Nov 2011

Book Review, Richard Utz And Tom Shippey (Eds), Medievalism And The Modern World: Essays In Honour Of Leslie Workman, Louise D'Arcens

Louise D'Arcens

As an area of enquiry, the academic study of medievalism has seemed constitutionally, and indeed institutionally, marginal. Neither fish nor fowl, its interdisciplinarity has long consigned it in the eyes of many medievalists to the shadowy realm of para-disciplinarity, seemingly doomed to the task of merely commenting on the work of others. In recent years, however, Anglophone medieval studies has witnessed the growing momentum of what might be called a "medievalist turn". The emergence of numerous studies of the historical and political forces buttressing the emergence of the discipline, along with the biographical studies of Helen Damico and Norman Cantor ...


Book Review - Allison Levy, Widowhood And Visual Culture In Early Modern Europe, Louise D'Arcens Nov 2011

Book Review - Allison Levy, Widowhood And Visual Culture In Early Modern Europe, Louise D'Arcens

Louise D'Arcens

The past decade has witnessed the appearance of a number of excellent edited essay collections dealing with widowhood in the European past, including Louise Mirrer’s Upon My Husband’s Death: Widows in the Literature and Histories of Medieval Europe (1992), Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl’s Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages (1999), and Sandra Cavallo and Lyndan Warner’s Widowhood in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (1999). The essays assembled by Allison Levy in Widowhood and Visual Culture in Early Modern Europe offer a distinctive contribution to the existing scholarship, shifting the focus ...