Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Parenting

Discipline
Institution
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 572

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

A Four-Session Workshop For Parents Of Children With Autism: Understanding And Managing Challenging Behaviors, And Supporting The Development Of Children With Asd, Vanessa Huizar Dec 2020

A Four-Session Workshop For Parents Of Children With Autism: Understanding And Managing Challenging Behaviors, And Supporting The Development Of Children With Asd, Vanessa Huizar

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

Research studies continue to show that being a parent of a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) presents unique challenges for many families including understanding ASD deficits and behaviors, and identifying effective ways to manage these behaviors. Because ASD interventions generally take a behaviorally-based approach, parents tend to lack an understanding of child development, positive child guidance practices, ways to build strong parent-child relationships, and methods to engage in enrichment activities that will support their child’s overall development. The purpose of the current project was to create a parent workshop to help parents of children with ASD: 1) understand ...


Relationship Between Maternal/Family Functioning And Social Functioning In Youth With Adhd, Ewald Michael Wefelmeyer Oct 2020

Relationship Between Maternal/Family Functioning And Social Functioning In Youth With Adhd, Ewald Michael Wefelmeyer

Master's Theses (2009 -)

Affecting roughly 5% of the population, Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common mental health disorder characterized by deficits in attention, activity level, and/or impulse control causing impairments across multiple domains of functioning (APA, 2013). Although ADHD is most commonly associated with impairment in academic and behavioral functioning, there also exists a strong connection between the disorder and significant social impairment. Indeed, youth with ADHD typically have fewer friends and experience significantly higher levels of peer rejection than do typically developing youth (Bagwell, Molina, Pelham, & Hoza, 2001). In addition to social problems, ADHD is often associated with problems in the home, such as poor parental and family functioning (Theule, Weiner, Tannock, & Jenkins, 2013). Research also indicates that parental distress is both directly and indirectly related to child behavioral and social problems (Sanner & Neece, 2018; Fenesey, Teh, & Lee, 2019). Therefore, it is possible that the relationship between social impairment ...


Parenting Challenges Of Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: Discipline, Child Education, Technology Use, And Outdated Health Beliefs, Ludivine Brunissen, Eli Rapoport, Kate Fruitman, Andrew Adesman Sep 2020

Parenting Challenges Of Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: Discipline, Child Education, Technology Use, And Outdated Health Beliefs, Ludivine Brunissen, Eli Rapoport, Kate Fruitman, Andrew Adesman

GrandFamilies: The Contemporary Journal of Research, Practice and Policy

BACKGROUND: As of 2015, approximately three million children in the United States were being raised primarily by their grandparents. This study aims to examine, in a large national sample, to what extent grandparents raising grandchildren (GRGs) have difficulty with discipline and meeting their grandchild’s educational and social needs, find computers/other technology challenging, and subscribe to outdated health beliefs.

METHODS: An anonymous online parenting questionnaire was administered to GRGs recruited through state and local grandparent support groups and elderly service agencies.

RESULTS: 733 grandparents that self-identified as the primary caregiver of one or more grandchildren met inclusion criteria. 56 ...


Thematic Dimensions Of Grandparent Caregiving: A Focus Group Approach, Bert Hayslip Jr., Rebekah P. Knight, Kyle S. Page, Carolyn Phillips Sep 2020

Thematic Dimensions Of Grandparent Caregiving: A Focus Group Approach, Bert Hayslip Jr., Rebekah P. Knight, Kyle S. Page, Carolyn Phillips

GrandFamilies: The Contemporary Journal of Research, Practice and Policy

The present study involved 75 grandparent caregivers (M age = 59) who participated in focus groups targeting their needs and concerns relevant to raising their grandchildren. Based upon a qualitative analysis of group session notes reliably cross referenced across 3 observers, the following themes emerged: 1) Isolation, disenfranchisement, and marginalization with regard to others, 2) Difficulty in dealing with and frustration with the adult child whose child one is raising, 3) The need to be able to cope with one’s own emotions and life situation, 4) Difficulties in coping with the emotional, interpersonal, or behavioral problems of the grandchild, 5 ...


Navigating The “Blind World”: The Psychosocial And Occupational Experiences Of Parents Of Adolescents With Visual Impairments, Peiwen Cao Aug 2020

Navigating The “Blind World”: The Psychosocial And Occupational Experiences Of Parents Of Adolescents With Visual Impairments, Peiwen Cao

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Using a constructivist narrative inquiry approach, this research study sought to explore how parents of adolescents with visual impairments story their psychosocial and occupational experiences. Participants of the study consisted of four parents who were currently raising adolescents with visual impairments between the ages of 14 to 17. Participants took part in two in-depth narrative interviews, in which they answered several open-ended questions about their experiences of raising their adolescent children who were visually impaired. Participants also participated in a brief concluding interview session, in which they provided feedback on the narrative that I constructed based on their interview responses ...


Student-Athlete Success: An Examination Of Parenting, Grit, Academic Success, And Mental Health Outcomes, Jackson Howard Aug 2020

Student-Athlete Success: An Examination Of Parenting, Grit, Academic Success, And Mental Health Outcomes, Jackson Howard

Dissertations

Factors such as poor adjustment, substance misuse, and mental health concerns have been found to be detrimental to college student success. Considering this, researchers have focused on investigating protective factors, which may enhance performance in higher education. Specifically, non-cognitive traits, such as grit, or an ability to maintain determination and passion for long-term goals in the face of adversity, and positive parenting strategies, such as psychological autonomy granting, have been tied to positive outcomes for college students in higher education. Conversely, overparenting behaviors and negative outcomes, such as burnout, have been found to be damaging to student success. Student-athletes are ...


The Experiences Of Latino Adolescent Mentees Growing-Up With A Single Mother And Mentoring Program Development: A Narrative Analysis Study, Christine Marie Bishop Aug 2020

The Experiences Of Latino Adolescent Mentees Growing-Up With A Single Mother And Mentoring Program Development: A Narrative Analysis Study, Christine Marie Bishop

Faculty Publications

Latinos comprise the largest minority population in the United States. Research underscores the many positive effects that mentors can have on Latino adolescents who lack a male role model living in the home. Mentors can provide support and teach helpful skills that can be applied to multiple life domains needed throughout a person’s lifespan. There are many different types of mentoring services and styles available to adolescents. Yet, there are specific gaps and room for growth within the scholarly literature regarding Latino adolescents that need to be addressed. Shining light and allowing their narratives to be heard and understood ...


Can A Brief Online Intervention Change Low-Income Caregivers’ Reported Use Of Spanking? A Randomized Controlled Trial, Hilary L. Richardson Aug 2020

Can A Brief Online Intervention Change Low-Income Caregivers’ Reported Use Of Spanking? A Randomized Controlled Trial, Hilary L. Richardson

Dissertations

Spanking is commonly used by parents (64-94%) in the United States as a strategy for managing undesirable child behaviors. Research has found that the use of spanking is particularly high among young mothers, low-income parents, and African American families. Decades of literature on the use of spanking has identified abundant detrimental outcomes for children such as increased externalizing behaviors, decreased long-term compliance, and less guilt following misbehavior, as well as serious outcomes in adulthood such as depressed mood and alcohol/drug use. There is also a risk for spanking to escalate to physical abuse. Thus, safer, more effective discipline strategies ...


Tuning Into The Real Effect Of Smartphone Use On Parenting: A Multiverse Analysis, Kathryn L. Modecki, Samantha Low-Choy, Bep N. Uink, Lynette Vernon, Helen Correia, Kylie Andrews Aug 2020

Tuning Into The Real Effect Of Smartphone Use On Parenting: A Multiverse Analysis, Kathryn L. Modecki, Samantha Low-Choy, Bep N. Uink, Lynette Vernon, Helen Correia, Kylie Andrews

ECU Publications Post 2013

© 2020 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Background: Concerns have been raised regarding the potential negative impacts of parents’ smartphone use on the parent–child relationship. A scoping literature review indicated inconsistent effects, arguably attributable to different conceptualizations of parent phone use and conflation of phone use with technological interference. Methods: Based on a sample of n = 3, 659 parents collected in partnership with a national public broadcaster, we conducted a multiverse analysis. We explored 84 different analytic choices to address whether associations were weak versus robust, and provide clearer direction for measurement, theory, and practice. Effects were assessed in relation to p values, effect sizes, and AIC; we further conducted a meta-analytic sensitivity check. Results: Direct associations between smartphone use and parenting were relatively weak and mixed. Instead, the relation between use and parenting depended on level of technological interference. This pattern was particularly robust for family displacement. At low levels of displacing time with family using technology, more smartphone use was associated with better (not worse) parenting. Conclusions: Our results indicate fragility in findings of risks for parental smartphone use on parenting; there were few concerns in this regard. Rather, at low levels ...


Father Knows Best: The Interactive Effects Of Fathering Quantity And Quality On Child Self-Regulation, Mamatha Chetlur Chary Jul 2020

Father Knows Best: The Interactive Effects Of Fathering Quantity And Quality On Child Self-Regulation, Mamatha Chetlur Chary

Doctoral Dissertations

In the past decade, developmental research has seen a surge of work regarding fathers and their influences of various aspects of child outcomes- cognitive and socioemotional. Studies show that father involvement, or “quantity” of time the father spends with the child, as well as fathering “quality”, or the characteristics marking the father-child relationship (warmth, supportiveness, sensitivity etc.), can both contribute to variance in the development of individual differences in child outcomes such as language skills, academic success and psychological well-being. One facet of adaptive development, self-regulation (SR), is a robust and consistent predictor of high academic success, fulfilling interpersonal relationships ...


Father-Adolescent Relationship Closeness: A Path Analysis Of Family Factor Associates With Father-Adolescent Engagement And Relationship Quality, Mark H. Trahan, Richard H. Morely, Kevin Shafer Jun 2020

Father-Adolescent Relationship Closeness: A Path Analysis Of Family Factor Associates With Father-Adolescent Engagement And Relationship Quality, Mark H. Trahan, Richard H. Morely, Kevin Shafer

Faculty Publications

Father-adolescent child relationship quality has been identified as key to adolescent health outcomes. While factors have previously been identified associated with father-adolescent closeness, a comprehensive model of understanding the influence of these factors is needed. Using cross-sectional data from the Study of Contemporary Fatherhood (SCF), this analysis of father-adolescent relationship closeness evaluated responses of nine hundred (N = 900) father surveys to investigate historical factors, including own father relationship quality, biological fathering, family transitions, and ACEs along with current factors, including co-parenting, depression, parenting stress, knowledge of adolescent, warmth, and engagement, on father-adolescent relationship closeness. Path analysis results indicate that father-adolescent ...


A Parenting Curriculum For Parents And Caregivers Of Young Children With A Focus On Attachment Theory, Alexandria Driscoll Jun 2020

A Parenting Curriculum For Parents And Caregivers Of Young Children With A Focus On Attachment Theory, Alexandria Driscoll

Electronic Theses, Projects, and Dissertations

Attachment science has shown the importance of a purposeful and secure parent-child relationship. A secure attachment relationship includes sensitivity, responsiveness, and warmth. However, these behaviors may not come naturally to some parents due to lack of knowledge, stress, mental health issues, and/or past relationships. The purpose of this project was to inform parents about attachment science, increase parents’ confidence, and reduce parental stress by providing four two-hour workshop sessions. This project specifically targeted parents of young children. During the implementation of the project, the platform of the sessions changed from face-to-face to online due to the Covid-19 pandemic and ...


A Dyadic Analysis Of Depressive Symptoms And Harsh And Rejecting Parenting In Filipino Mothers And Fathers, Rosanne M. Jocson Jun 2020

A Dyadic Analysis Of Depressive Symptoms And Harsh And Rejecting Parenting In Filipino Mothers And Fathers, Rosanne M. Jocson

Psychology Department Faculty Publications

This study examines within-person and cross-person relations between depressive symptoms, harsh parenting, and parental rejection in low-income Filipino mothers and fathers of adolescents using an actor-partner interdependence model (APIM). Mother and father dyads (N = 81, Mage = 43.48, SD = 8.66) recruited from urban neighborhoods in the Philippines completed orally administered questionnaires on depressive symptoms, harsh parenting, and rejection. Results showed that mothers' scores and fathers' scores on depressive symptoms did not significantly differ and that mothers scored significantly higher than fathers on harsh parenting and rejection. Dyadic analyses using the APIM showed that the actor effect of depressive symptoms ...


Latina Mothers Awareness Of Their Childrens Exposure To Community Violence, Rosanne M. Jocson, Francheska Alers-Rojas, James Cranford, Rosario Ceballo Jun 2020

Latina Mothers Awareness Of Their Childrens Exposure To Community Violence, Rosanne M. Jocson, Francheska Alers-Rojas, James Cranford, Rosario Ceballo

Psychology Department Faculty Publications

This study examines (a) the degree of agreement between mother-reported child community violence exposure and children's self-reports and whether agreement changes over time; (b) whether child gender is associated with mother-child agreement; and (c) whether greater mother-child agreement is concurrently and longitudinally associated with children's psychological well-being. We conducted secondary data analyses using longitudinal data with a socioeconomically diverse sample of 287 Latino adolescents (MageW2 = 11.2, 47% girls) and their mothers (MageW1 = 35.3) from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods. Mother-child agreement about non-exposure to violence was high. However, for violence-exposed children, mothers overestimated ...


Relations Between Executive Function And Parenting Behavior, Robin Alexandra Riddick May 2020

Relations Between Executive Function And Parenting Behavior, Robin Alexandra Riddick

Honors Theses

Past research focused on how harsh parenting related to EF and behavior problems in children when other factors (i.e., maternal stress, household chaos, socioeconomic risk factors) were present. However, the literature was lacking in the examination of the relationship between EF and other parenting styles. This study aimed to examine the relationship between different aspects of executive function and regulation (i.e, inhibition, working memory, cognitive flexibility, problem solving, and impulsivity) and parenting and routines (i.e., laxness, hostility, overreactivity, and sleep and routines). To study this, parents of 18 to 24 month olds were administered a battery of ...


“A Lot Of Prayer, And Some Wine In-Between”: Applying The Relational Turbulence Model To The Stepparent-Biological Parent Marriage., Paul Taylor May 2020

“A Lot Of Prayer, And Some Wine In-Between”: Applying The Relational Turbulence Model To The Stepparent-Biological Parent Marriage., Paul Taylor

Electronic Theses and Dissertations

The present study utilizes the relational turbulence model (RTM) to illuminate stepparent experiences of relational uncertainty and partner interference within the context of the stepparent-biological parent marriage. In-depth, semi-structured interviews with 6 stepparents revealed four primary themes pertaining to how stepparents experienced relational uncertainty: (a) enactment of parenting, (b) competing expectations, (c) shifts in attitude and behavior by spouse, and (d) differences between marriage partners. Interference from partners was experienced by stepparents in relation to the enactment of parenting and the maintaining of the marriage as an intimate relationship.


Tag-Team Back Again : Using Memory As Method To Understand The Intergenerational Transmission Of Egalitarian Parenting In My Black Family, Rebecca M. Swann May 2020

Tag-Team Back Again : Using Memory As Method To Understand The Intergenerational Transmission Of Egalitarian Parenting In My Black Family, Rebecca M. Swann

Theses, Dissertations and Culminating Projects

Life course theory’s (Elder, 1998) principles of linked lives and historical time and place can be used to understand how attitudes, values, and behaviors are passed down across generations amid the historical context of Black families in the United States. This dissertation used autoethnography to explore the construction and transmission of egalitarianism, allowing the researcher to be both participant and analyst. Qualitative data consisted of critical reflections and 17 individual oral history interviews with family members across four generations. Procedures outlined in Gilligan’s Listening Guide were used to analyze data, resulting in pronoun-poems for each interviewee and generation ...


Korean American Immigrant Mothers’ Child Launching Experiences : Understanding Of Parenting And Mother-Child Relationships In Midlife, Soo-Bin You May 2020

Korean American Immigrant Mothers’ Child Launching Experiences : Understanding Of Parenting And Mother-Child Relationships In Midlife, Soo-Bin You

Theses, Dissertations and Culminating Projects

Guided by the theoretical frameworks of family development and family systems theories from the life course perspective, the present study explored how Korean American mothers make sense of their child launching experiences in immigration context, and describe the family dynamics around parenting and parent-child relationship during the life transition. Focusing on the developmental task of child launching, thus, this study examined the topic that has received scarce attention in scholarly literature – culturally specific experiences of parenting and parent-child relationship from the perspective of Korean immigrant mothers in midlife.

To delve into the lived experiences of Korean immigrant mothers, this study ...


Parenting Styles And Child Outcomes In Puerto Rican Families: A Comparison Of Individual And Dyadic Coding, Jeisianne Rosario Colón May 2020

Parenting Styles And Child Outcomes In Puerto Rican Families: A Comparison Of Individual And Dyadic Coding, Jeisianne Rosario Colón

All Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Parenting styles are comprised from three dimensions: warmth, autonomy granting, and demandingness. These dimensions combined form four parenting styles: authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and neglectful. Forty-nine Puerto Rican families with children 6-11 years participated. Families engaged in several tasks that were coded using the Parenting Style Observation Rating Scale and child outcomes were measured using the Child Behavior Checklist. Overall, parents received high ratings in warmth, autonomy granting, and supportive demandingness, and low scores in nonsupportive demandingness. There were some differences between parents, with mothers exhibiting higher levels of warmth with girls than boys, and higher levels of autonomy granting and ...


The Relationship Between Children’S Misbehavior And Parental Discipline, Hannah Buggs, Emma Smith Apr 2020

The Relationship Between Children’S Misbehavior And Parental Discipline, Hannah Buggs, Emma Smith

Georgia College Student Research Events

The way parents perceive behaviors in children as to whether they are harmful would influence how they choose to deal with that behavior. When employing ineffective disciplinary styles consistently throughout children’s development, behavioral issues may continue to arise. Researchers oftentimes study how parenting discipline styles affect a child’s behavior. However, researchers often fail to study how parental perception of children’s behaviors concerning parenting disciplinary styles. In terms of behaviors, the frequency of children’s positive and negative behaviors may be related to how parents choose to regulate the child. For example, if the child demonstrates a higher ...


Exploring Love In Family Relationships, Joe Meshach Chelladurai Apr 2020

Exploring Love In Family Relationships, Joe Meshach Chelladurai

Theses and Dissertations

The purpose of the study was to qualitatively investigate love in religious family relationships. Participants were from the American Families of Faith Project, a qualitative study on religion and family life with participants from 198 Christian, Jewish, and Muslim families (N = 478) across the United States. The primary research questions of present study were (a) what does love mean for families? (b) why do individuals and couples in families love? (c) how is love experienced? (d) what are the related processes of love? (e) how does religion influence love in religious families? and (f) what are the reported outcomes of ...


A Parent’S Role In Outdoor Play, Julia Robinson Apr 2020

A Parent’S Role In Outdoor Play, Julia Robinson

Honours Bachelor of Early Childhood Leadership (HBECL) Capstone Research Posters

This qualitative study used a narrative research design to explore how a parent plays a key role in their child’s level of outdoor play, and the factors they consider during their child's engagement in it. Research indicates that outdoor play is an essential part of a child’s life as it supports the development of socio-emotional, cognitive, and physical skills. However, research has also indicated that children are not spending enough time outdoors. In this study, five participants (parents of children between 2-12 years) shared their thoughts, experiences, and perspectives on the topic of outdoor play. The interviews ...


Parent Perceptions Of The Acceptability, Effectiveness, And Experience Of Engaging In The Group Stepping Stones Triple P Intervention For Parents Of Children With Disabilities, Tara B. Delach Apr 2020

Parent Perceptions Of The Acceptability, Effectiveness, And Experience Of Engaging In The Group Stepping Stones Triple P Intervention For Parents Of Children With Disabilities, Tara B. Delach

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The challenges associated with parenting are often compounded for parents of children with developmental disabilities. Children with developmental disabilities are at increased risk for exhibiting mental health concerns and challenging behavior compared to their typically developing peers. Parents who are raising a child with a disability tend to experience increased demands, higher levels of stress, and greater challenges associated with the physical, emotional, and behavioral needs of their children than do parents of typically developing children. Parent training interventions grounded in social learning theory and behavioral principles have proven to be effective in improving both child and parent outcomes in ...


Book Review: The Science Of Parenting Adopted Children, Nathanael Davis Apr 2020

Book Review: The Science Of Parenting Adopted Children, Nathanael Davis

Library Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Development Of Neural And Behavioral Inhibitory Control During Adolescence: The Integrative Effects Of Family Socioeconomic Status And Parenting Behaviors, Mengjiao Li Mar 2020

Development Of Neural And Behavioral Inhibitory Control During Adolescence: The Integrative Effects Of Family Socioeconomic Status And Parenting Behaviors, Mengjiao Li

Doctoral Dissertations

Inhibitory control (IC) has drawn great attention from researchers and practitioners and the concurrent association between family socioeconomic status and IC in adolescence is well-documented. However, little is known about whether and how family socioeconomic status influence the individual differences in the development of adolescent IC. The current investigation aimed to address this gap in knowledge by employing two multiple-wave longitudinal studies of IC. In the early adolescent sample (N = 311), color-word Stroop task performance was assessed as a measure of IC when individuals were 10 and 13 years old. In the middle adolescent sample (N = 167), multisource interference task ...


The Experiences Of Parents And Facilitators In A Positive Parenting Program, Lauren Stenason, Jessie Moorman, Elisa Romano Jan 2020

The Experiences Of Parents And Facilitators In A Positive Parenting Program, Lauren Stenason, Jessie Moorman, Elisa Romano

The Qualitative Report

The researchers examined facilitators’ and parents’ experiences with the Positive Discipline in Everyday Parenting (PDEP) program through qualitative methodology. PDEP is a primary prevention program that teaches parents to move away from physical punishment and toward conflict resolution and positive parenting that focuses on stages of child development. Using a phenomenological approach, we conducted focus groups using semi-structured interviews with four PDEP facilitators and seven parents who completed the program. Parents and facilitators indicated that PDEP helped them learn new ways of thinking about parenting and contributed to overall changes in their parenting approach, including finding a balance of structured ...


Connections: Social Media And Parents Raising Children With Profound Multiple Disabilities, Amy Ann Terra Jan 2020

Connections: Social Media And Parents Raising Children With Profound Multiple Disabilities, Amy Ann Terra

University of the Pacific Theses and Dissertations

Parenting plays an important role in many adult lives. Parenting a child with profound multiple disabilities results in a distinct parenting experience. This qualitative phenomenological study examined the role of social media in the lives of parents raising children with profound multiple disabilities. Five parents raising children with profound multiple disabilities were interviewed, and resulting themes were identified.

Consistent with previous research, parents described the initial adaptation to their child’s disability-related needs as the most challenging period of their parenting to date. Adaptation was followed by an acclimation to a new normal of their parenting experience. Parents described moving ...


"The Utmost Strength I Can Bear": Strategies And Psychological Costs Of Mothering Within Political Violence, Cindy A. Sousa, Mona El-Zuhairi, Manahil Siddiqi Jan 2020

"The Utmost Strength I Can Bear": Strategies And Psychological Costs Of Mothering Within Political Violence, Cindy A. Sousa, Mona El-Zuhairi, Manahil Siddiqi

Graduate School of Social Work and Social Research Faculty Research and Scholarship

Though certainly not women’s only identity or set of responsibilities for women in conflict settings, political violence creates distinct challenges for mothers due to the additional burdens of care-taking in these contexts. Yet, given the paucity of research on the topic, we still are operating without a clear understanding of how political violence jeopardizes maternal well-being and care-taking practices. Drawing on feminist perspectives on mothering, in the analyses presented here, authors use content analysis to explore mothering and political violence from five focus groups with women in Palestine. Results demonstrate the considerable suffering mothers and children endure in war ...


Parental Self-Efficacy And Parenting Through Adversity, Christian Scannell Jan 2020

Parental Self-Efficacy And Parenting Through Adversity, Christian Scannell

Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies Department Faculty Works

This review examines the relationship between life adversities, parental well-being, parental self-efficacy, and social support as potential factors mediating parent-child relationships and children’s outcomes. Generally, research on adversity has focused on children’s experiences and the long-term impact of adversity on development and health trajectories. More recently, a focus on resilience and growth after adversity has received increasing attention. Existing literature has identified how parents can best support their children through adverse events and suggested parenting programs that emphasize skill-building to parent children who have experienced adversity. Yet often overlooked is the critical impact of adverse events on the ...


Mothers’ And Fathers’ Self-Regulation Capacity, Dysfunctional Attributions And Hostile Parenting During Early Adolescence: A Process-Oriented Approach, Melissa L. Sturge-Apple, Zhi Li, Meredith J. Martin, Hannah R. Jones-Gordils, Patrick T. Davies Jan 2020

Mothers’ And Fathers’ Self-Regulation Capacity, Dysfunctional Attributions And Hostile Parenting During Early Adolescence: A Process-Oriented Approach, Melissa L. Sturge-Apple, Zhi Li, Meredith J. Martin, Hannah R. Jones-Gordils, Patrick T. Davies

Educational Psychology Papers and Publications

The parent-child relationship undergoes substantial reorganization over the transition to adolescence. Navigating this change is a challenge for parents because teens desire more behavioral autonomy as well as input in decision-making processes. Although it has been demon- strated that changes in parental socialization approaches facilitates adolescent adjustment, very little work has been devoted to understand- ing the underlying mechanisms supporting parents’ abilities to adjust caregiving during this period. Guided by self-regulation models of parenting, the present study examined how parental physiological and cognitive regulatory capacities were associated with hostile and insen- sitive parent conflict behavior over time. From a process-oriented ...