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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 31 - 36 of 36

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Let Us Get You Into College: Community College Librarians, Barnes & Noble, And Oer, Colleen Sanders Mar 2019

Let Us Get You Into College: Community College Librarians, Barnes & Noble, And Oer, Colleen Sanders

OLA Quarterly

Clackamas Community College (CCC) became the first Oregon community college to contract with Barnes & Noble Education (BNED) for bookstore services in July 2018. The college-run bookstore’s contribution to the general fund was shrinking with each budget cycle, whereas BNED guaranteed a minimum annual commission of $200,000. This article describes the steps CCC librarians took to influence the contract after discovering objectionable language including, but not limited to, faculty use of Open Educational Resources (OER) and linking to OER in the learning management system (LMS). The librarians' advocacy has shed light on the need to ask fundamental questions about the purpose of a college bookstore, especially at a community college with an equity- and access-driven mission. Is a bookstore a core student service or a profit-generating enterprise?

After a deep read of BNED’s service proposal and sample contract, librarians identified campus partners, raised specific questions at meetings, met with administration, and sought guidance from the OER community to inform an advocacy strategy. Beyond the contract, this exploratory process uncovered a long list of questions worth asking, as well as details about BNED’s OER products and services. BNED offers OER-based products on a proprietary courseware platform that comes at a cost to students. In the absence of a faculty-driven OER program, BNED is now the primary OER mouthpiece and infrastructure on campus. What might that mean for the future of OER at an institution? This article intends to support colleagues who find themselves in a similar situation; a likely scenario, given that the contract includes language indicating other Oregon colleges may re-use it without a request for proposals.


Getting Up To Speed On Oer: Advice From A Newbie, Amy Stanforth Mar 2019

Getting Up To Speed On Oer: Advice From A Newbie, Amy Stanforth

OLA Quarterly

Open Educational Resources (OER) programs are growing and institutions are looking for leaders to steer these programs successfully. This article will give advice to folks who are tasked with starting an OER program or joining an established program in its growth stage. It will discuss where to find OER research for those who don’t know much about it, such as LibGuides, pertinent journals, and OER repositories. Then, it will move onto building campus partnerships and finding like-minded people in your institution that can champion the cause and help grow the program as well as provide institutional support. Next, it ...


Sciences And Technology Open Resources: A Collaborative Effort Between Libraries And Faculty, Adelaide Clark, Dawn Lowe-Wincentsen Mar 2019

Sciences And Technology Open Resources: A Collaborative Effort Between Libraries And Faculty, Adelaide Clark, Dawn Lowe-Wincentsen

OLA Quarterly

Open Oregon Educational Resources (2018) researched the changes open educational resources have had on textbook affordability in community colleges in Oregon between 2015 and 2017. One comparison in the report is the number of hours a student working minimum wage would need to work to afford course materials. In 2017, at a two-year college that was 176 hours of work. While similar data is not yet available for Oregon four-year universities, one may assume it is near to double or more, topping 300 hours of work.

Open access is in relation to the license type of a text or material ...


Ifixit With The Library: Partnering For Open Pedagogy In Technical Writing, Forrest Johnson, Michaela Willi Hooper Mar 2019

Ifixit With The Library: Partnering For Open Pedagogy In Technical Writing, Forrest Johnson, Michaela Willi Hooper

OLA Quarterly

This article describes how a technical writing instructor adopted an open textbook from the Dozuki repair company and an accompanying open pedagogy project through iFixit, for which students wrote openly-licensed repair articles. His work was supported and amplified by the Linn-Benton Community College’s Textbook Affordability Steering Committee and the library. Open pedagogy provides many opportunities for instructor-librarian collaboration. In this case, the library was able to provide information literacy support on intellectual property to the class and help the instructor promote the project across campus and beyond.


The Four Factors Of Fair Use, Sarah P. Appedu Feb 2019

The Four Factors Of Fair Use, Sarah P. Appedu

Musselman Library Staff Publications

This poster was created in a collaborative effort by Musselman Library’s Copyright Committee as part of a display for Fair Use Week 2019. The poster was intended to get viewers to think about the 4 factors of fair use in the context of fan fiction and was paired with an interactive quiz game applying the four factors to a series of court cases over creators' uses of copyrighted work.

To take our quiz and see if you can determine whether each case is or is not an example of fair use, visit our Fair Use Week 2019 interactive website.


The Failure Of Skepticism: Rethinking Information Literacy And Political Polarization In A Post-Truth Era, Christopher A. Sweet Feb 2019

The Failure Of Skepticism: Rethinking Information Literacy And Political Polarization In A Post-Truth Era, Christopher A. Sweet

Christopher A. Sweet

Fake news has been shown to spread far faster than facts on social media platforms. Rampant fake news has led to deep political polarization and the undermining of basic democratic institutions. Skepticism is an important component of information literacy and has often been pointed to as the antidote to the fake news epidemic. Why are skepticism and information literacy failing so terrifically in this post-truth era? The presenters will summarize research drawn from the fields of psychology and mass communication that shows just how hardwired people are to believe information from their own “tribes” and resist outside contrary information.
 
How ...