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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Libraries

Collection Development and Management

Rollins College

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Atg Special Report — Purchasing Articles By Demand-Driven Acquisition: An Alternative Serial Distribution Model For Libraries, Jonathan H. Harwell, James Bunnelle Feb 2017

Atg Special Report — Purchasing Articles By Demand-Driven Acquisition: An Alternative Serial Distribution Model For Libraries, Jonathan H. Harwell, James Bunnelle

Faculty Publications

It’s 2017, and library patrons still have limited ways to access the text of articles behind pay walls. The current mix of subscriptions, interlibrary loan or document delivery, and pay per view is unsustainable for endangered library budgets, and thus is unsustainable for publishers. It’s time to begin leveraging the tools we use for e-books-- discovery services, demand-driven acquisition (DDA), and perpetual purchase-- and apply them to articles. After all, the distinction between a monograph and a serial is fluid. Books in series, book-length articles, article-length books, and special issues sold as monographs illustrate the folly of treating ...


Library Security Gates: Effectiveness And Current Practice, Jonathan H. Harwell Apr 2014

Library Security Gates: Effectiveness And Current Practice, Jonathan H. Harwell

Faculty Publications

For years, library personnel have relied on security gates to prevent theft from their collections. However, recent anecdotal evidence suggests that libraries are removing the gates for various reasons, including cost and patron frustration with false alarms. This study examines current practices via a survey of libraries and security gate vendors and analyzes the effectiveness of security gates by empirical testing of alarms and with loss inventories of collection samples, supplemented by lost item statistics from interlibrary loan. Thus we use three primary methods to assess libraries’ approaches to security gates.