Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Landscape

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Publication Year

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

#Metoo Has Changed The Media Landscape, But In Australia There Is Still Much To Be Done, Bianca Fileborn, Rachel E. Loney-Howes, Sophie Hindes Jan 2019

#Metoo Has Changed The Media Landscape, But In Australia There Is Still Much To Be Done, Bianca Fileborn, Rachel E. Loney-Howes, Sophie Hindes

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Emerging in October 2017 in response to allegations of sexual assault perpetrated by Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, #MeToo highlighted the potential for traditional and social media to work together to generate global interest in gender-based violence. Within 24 hours, survivors around the world had used the hashtag 12 million times.


Living With Landscape Fire: Landholder Understandings Of Agency, Scale And Control Within Fiery Entanglements, Amanda Edwards, Nicholas J. Gill Jan 2016

Living With Landscape Fire: Landholder Understandings Of Agency, Scale And Control Within Fiery Entanglements, Amanda Edwards, Nicholas J. Gill

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Around the world, debates over how to manage and adapt to bushfires (or wildfires) are increasingly prominent as more and different people, many of whom have little or no experience with landscape fire or land management, inhabit fire-prone environments. But bushfire events represent only the most visible aspect of complex entanglements which operate across huge temporal and spatial scales and over which humans have very limited control. In this article, we focus on how Australian landholders of settler or migrant heritage understand scalar complexities and agency and control within human/landscape fire entanglements. In view of the fact that the ...


Landscape Preferences, Amenity, And Bushfire Risk In New South Wales, Australia, Nicholas J. Gill, Olivia V. Dun, Christopher R. Brennan-Horley, Christine Eriksen Jan 2015

Landscape Preferences, Amenity, And Bushfire Risk In New South Wales, Australia, Nicholas J. Gill, Olivia V. Dun, Christopher R. Brennan-Horley, Christine Eriksen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper examines landscape preferences of residents in amenity-rich bushfire-prone landscapes in New South Wales, Australia. Insights are provided into vegetation preferences in areas where properties neighbor large areas of native vegetation, such as national parks, or exist within a matrix of cleared and vegetated private and public land. In such areas, managing fuel loads in the proximity of houses is likely to reduce the risk of house loss and damage. Preferences for vegetation appearance and structure were related to varying fuel loads, particularly the density of understorey vegetation and larger trees. The study adopted a qualitative visual research approach ...


Technological Innovation In Action: Transforming The Learning Landscape For Multi-Locations Through Networked Interactive Whiteboards, Maria T. Bavaro Jan 2010

Technological Innovation In Action: Transforming The Learning Landscape For Multi-Locations Through Networked Interactive Whiteboards, Maria T. Bavaro

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper commences to unpack the possibilities for the question: how can technologies transform the learning for our future regional teachers? Videoconference and interactive whiteboards are not new. Yet, the innovation of these technologies has resulted in a new way of thinking to enhance the learning experiences for regional students who often feel disconnected when studying from a distance (Moore, 1997; Knipe &Lee, 2002; Saw et al., 2008; Worthy, Arul & Brickell, 2008). The advancement arises when a shared digital canvas is created using networked interactive whiteboards in conjunction with the videoconference for video and audio communication to provide two-way distance learning. The Networked Solutions Project is an exemplar of such technologies being developed to improve the learning landscape for regional pre-service teachers at the University of Wollongong (UOW). The new infrastructure, technologies and evidence-based research of multi-location delivery attempts to address issues of: fragmentation; duplication; inconsistency and in-equitability as identified by Winchester & Sterk (2006) in their Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) audit for regional universities. This paper is a work in progress; it explores multi-location delivery of the Graduate Diploma of Education (GDE), the pilot program for the project. Data collection will occur throughout the year ...