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Landscape

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

The Relationship Between Particulate Pollution Levels In Australian Cities, Meteorology, And Landscape Fire Activity Detected From Modis Hotspots, Owen F. Price, Grant J. Williamson, Sarah B. Henderson, Fay Johnston, David M. J. S Bowman Jan 2012

The Relationship Between Particulate Pollution Levels In Australian Cities, Meteorology, And Landscape Fire Activity Detected From Modis Hotspots, Owen F. Price, Grant J. Williamson, Sarah B. Henderson, Fay Johnston, David M. J. S Bowman

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Generally, sigmoid curves are used to describe the growth of animals over their lifetime. However, because growth rates often differ over an animal's lifetime a single curve may not accurately capture the growth. Broken-stick models constrained to pass through a common point have been proposed to describe the different growth phases, but these are often unsatisfactory because essentially there are still two functions that describe the lifetime growth. To provide a single, converged model to age animals with disparate growth phases we developed a smoothly joining two-phase nonlinear function (SJ2P), tailored to provide a more accurate description of lifetime ...


Establishment And Persistence Of Species-Rich Patches In A Species-Poor Landscape: Role Of A Structure-Forming Subtidal Barnacle, A. R. Davis, David. W. Ward Jan 2009

Establishment And Persistence Of Species-Rich Patches In A Species-Poor Landscape: Role Of A Structure-Forming Subtidal Barnacle, A. R. Davis, David. W. Ward

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Some sessile invertebrates are capable of maintaining space in barren habitats produced by sea urchins, thereby creating species-rich patches in a species-poor landscape. We sought to determine the role of a large and common barnacle, Austrobalanus imperator, in the establishment and persistence of these species-rich patches. Barnacle density was modified in 2 experiments at sites in southeastern Australia. The first experiment concerned community establishment and involved the addition of barnacles in 4 densities (zero [control], low, medium and high) to plots on vertical rock surfaces. The addition of barnacles at ecologically realistic densities and spatial arrangements rapidly resulted in statistically ...


Sandy Creek Gorge; Humans, Palaeofloods And Landscape Evolution, John D. Jansen, Derek Fabel Jan 2009

Sandy Creek Gorge; Humans, Palaeofloods And Landscape Evolution, John D. Jansen, Derek Fabel

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Relative Importance Of Fuel Management, Ignition Management And Weather For Area Burned: Evidence From Five Landscape-Fire-Succession Models, Geoffrey J. Cary, Mike D. Flannigan, Robert E. Keane, Ross A. Bradstock, Ian D. Davies, James M. Lenihan, Chao Li, Kimberley A. Logan, Russell A. Parsons Jan 2009

Relative Importance Of Fuel Management, Ignition Management And Weather For Area Burned: Evidence From Five Landscape-Fire-Succession Models, Geoffrey J. Cary, Mike D. Flannigan, Robert E. Keane, Ross A. Bradstock, Ian D. Davies, James M. Lenihan, Chao Li, Kimberley A. Logan, Russell A. Parsons

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

The behaviour of five landscape fire models (CAFE, FIRESCAPE, LAMOS(HS), LANDSUM and SEM-LAND) was compared in a standardised modelling experiment. The importance of fuel management approach, fuel management effort, ignition management effort and weather in determining variation in area burned and number of edge pixels burned (a measure of potential impact on assets adjacent to fire-prone landscapes) was quantified for a standardised modelling landscape. Importance was measured as the proportion of variation in area or edge pixels burned explained by each factor and all interactions among them. Weather and ignition management were consistently more important for explaining variation in ...


Living In A Land Of Fire, R. J. Whelan, P. Kanowski, M. Gill, A. Andersen Dec 2006

Living In A Land Of Fire, R. J. Whelan, P. Kanowski, M. Gill, A. Andersen

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Fires are an inherent part of the Australian environment. They cannot be prevented, but the risks they pose — to life, health, property and infrastructure, production systems, and to environment values — can be minimised through systematic evaluation and strategic planning and management. Fires have a fundamental and irreplaceable role in sustaining many of Australia’s natural ecosystems and ecological processes, and they are a valuable tool for achieving many land management objectives. However, if they are too frequent or too infrequent, too severe or too mild, or mistimed, they can erode ecosystem ‘health’ and biodiversity and compromise other land management goals ...


Landscape Variability And The Response Of Asian Megadeltas To Environmental Change, Colin D. Woodroffe, Robert J. Nicholls, Yoshiki Saito, Zhongyuan Chen, S L. Goodbred Jan 2006

Landscape Variability And The Response Of Asian Megadeltas To Environmental Change, Colin D. Woodroffe, Robert J. Nicholls, Yoshiki Saito, Zhongyuan Chen, S L. Goodbred

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Deltas, occurring at the mouths of river systems that deposit sediments as they enter the sea, are some of the most dynamic sedimentary environments. They contain a long, and often economically significant, sedimentary record of their response to past episodes of climate and sea-level change. Geological investigation of these deposits, and the processes controlling sedimentation, provide insights into the response of deltas to environmental change, which in turn may offer rational and cost-effective strategies for the sustainable management of natural resources and land use in these dynamic systems in the face of future environmental change.


Landscape Management: Is It The Future?, R. J. Whelan Jan 2004

Landscape Management: Is It The Future?, R. J. Whelan

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

As a Keynote Address at the 2004 Nature Conservation Council Conference, Bushfire in a Changing Environment - New Directions in Management, this paper argues that the landscape is a template with biodiversity assets, and human assets and bushfires overlaid. Two case studies, the Greater Glider and Eastern Bristlebird, are used to illustrate how the impact of bushfire on a species is contingent on it is distributed in the landscape, relative to the locations of its remnant habitat. Mitigation of bushfire effects, using fuel-reduction programs, is a process that also needs to be considered at a landscape scale, and has the potential ...


The Contested Domain Of Pastoralism: Landscape, Work And Outsiders In Central Australia , N. J. Gill Jan 1997

The Contested Domain Of Pastoralism: Landscape, Work And Outsiders In Central Australia , N. J. Gill

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Extensive cattle grazing has long been the dominant land use in Central Australian rangelands. Today, however, the pastoral landscape is increasingly fractured and contested by indigenous and environmentalist claims on land. Pastoralists in Central Australia are responding to environmentalist claims by reasserting territory. Territory is being constructed with reference to to particular forms of social nature and social space. Identities of insider and outsider have developed. These identities commonly correspond to pastoralists and others, such as conservationists and government, but the place specific nature of pastoralists' environmental knowledge has the potential to render pastoralists as outsiders as well. Moreover, as ...