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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

#Metoo Has Changed The Media Landscape, But In Australia There Is Still Much To Be Done, Bianca Fileborn, Rachel E. Loney-Howes, Sophie Hindes Jan 2019

#Metoo Has Changed The Media Landscape, But In Australia There Is Still Much To Be Done, Bianca Fileborn, Rachel E. Loney-Howes, Sophie Hindes

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Emerging in October 2017 in response to allegations of sexual assault perpetrated by Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, #MeToo highlighted the potential for traditional and social media to work together to generate global interest in gender-based violence. Within 24 hours, survivors around the world had used the hashtag 12 million times.


Living With Landscape Fire: Landholder Understandings Of Agency, Scale And Control Within Fiery Entanglements, Amanda Edwards, Nicholas J. Gill Jan 2016

Living With Landscape Fire: Landholder Understandings Of Agency, Scale And Control Within Fiery Entanglements, Amanda Edwards, Nicholas J. Gill

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Around the world, debates over how to manage and adapt to bushfires (or wildfires) are increasingly prominent as more and different people, many of whom have little or no experience with landscape fire or land management, inhabit fire-prone environments. But bushfire events represent only the most visible aspect of complex entanglements which operate across huge temporal and spatial scales and over which humans have very limited control. In this article, we focus on how Australian landholders of settler or migrant heritage understand scalar complexities and agency and control within human/landscape fire entanglements. In view of the fact that the ...


Landscape Preferences, Amenity, And Bushfire Risk In New South Wales, Australia, Nicholas J. Gill, Olivia V. Dun, Christopher R. Brennan-Horley, Christine Eriksen Jan 2015

Landscape Preferences, Amenity, And Bushfire Risk In New South Wales, Australia, Nicholas J. Gill, Olivia V. Dun, Christopher R. Brennan-Horley, Christine Eriksen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper examines landscape preferences of residents in amenity-rich bushfire-prone landscapes in New South Wales, Australia. Insights are provided into vegetation preferences in areas where properties neighbor large areas of native vegetation, such as national parks, or exist within a matrix of cleared and vegetated private and public land. In such areas, managing fuel loads in the proximity of houses is likely to reduce the risk of house loss and damage. Preferences for vegetation appearance and structure were related to varying fuel loads, particularly the density of understorey vegetation and larger trees. The study adopted a qualitative visual research approach ...


Landscape Scale Influences Of Forest Area And Housing Density On House Loss In The 2009 Victorian Bushfires, Owen Price, Ross Bradstock Jan 2013

Landscape Scale Influences Of Forest Area And Housing Density On House Loss In The 2009 Victorian Bushfires, Owen Price, Ross Bradstock

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

Previous investigations into the factors associated with house loss in wildfires have focused on the house construction and its immediate environment (e.g. gardens). Here, we examine how nearby native forest and other houses can influence house loss. Specifically, we used a sample of 3500 houses affected by the Victorian bushfires of February 7th 2009 to explore how the amount of forest, proportion of forest burned by crown fire and the number of nearby houses affected house loss and how far from the house this influence was exerted. These fires were the most destructive in Australian history and so represent ...


Rapid Regolith Formation Over Volcanic Bedrock And Implications For Landscape Evolution, Anthony Dosseto, Heather L. Buss, P O Suresh Jan 2012

Rapid Regolith Formation Over Volcanic Bedrock And Implications For Landscape Evolution, Anthony Dosseto, Heather L. Buss, P O Suresh

Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health - Papers: part A

The ability to quantify how fast weathering profiles develop is crucial to assessing soil resource depletion and quantifying how landscapes evolve over millennia. Uranium-series isotopes can be used to determine the age of the weathering front throughout a profile and to infer estimates of regolith production rates, because the abundance of U-series isotopes in a weathering profile is a function of chemical weathering and time. This technique is applied to a weathering profile in Puerto Rico developed over a volcaniclastic bedrock. U-series isotope compositions are modelled, revealing that it takes 40–60 kyr to develop an 18 m-thick profile. This ...


The Relationship Between Particulate Pollution Levels In Australian Cities, Meteorology, And Landscape Fire Activity Detected From Modis Hotspots, Owen F. Price, Grant J. Williamson, Sarah B. Henderson, Fay Johnston, David M. J. S Bowman Jan 2012

The Relationship Between Particulate Pollution Levels In Australian Cities, Meteorology, And Landscape Fire Activity Detected From Modis Hotspots, Owen F. Price, Grant J. Williamson, Sarah B. Henderson, Fay Johnston, David M. J. S Bowman

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Generally, sigmoid curves are used to describe the growth of animals over their lifetime. However, because growth rates often differ over an animal's lifetime a single curve may not accurately capture the growth. Broken-stick models constrained to pass through a common point have been proposed to describe the different growth phases, but these are often unsatisfactory because essentially there are still two functions that describe the lifetime growth. To provide a single, converged model to age animals with disparate growth phases we developed a smoothly joining two-phase nonlinear function (SJ2P), tailored to provide a more accurate description of lifetime ...


Technological Innovation In Action: Transforming The Learning Landscape For Multi-Locations Through Networked Interactive Whiteboards, Maria T. Bavaro Jan 2010

Technological Innovation In Action: Transforming The Learning Landscape For Multi-Locations Through Networked Interactive Whiteboards, Maria T. Bavaro

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers (Archive)

This paper commences to unpack the possibilities for the question: how can technologies transform the learning for our future regional teachers? Videoconference and interactive whiteboards are not new. Yet, the innovation of these technologies has resulted in a new way of thinking to enhance the learning experiences for regional students who often feel disconnected when studying from a distance (Moore, 1997; Knipe &Lee, 2002; Saw et al., 2008; Worthy, Arul & Brickell, 2008). The advancement arises when a shared digital canvas is created using networked interactive whiteboards in conjunction with the videoconference for video and audio communication to provide two-way distance learning. The Networked Solutions Project is an exemplar of such technologies being developed to improve the learning landscape for regional pre-service teachers at the University of Wollongong (UOW). The new infrastructure, technologies and evidence-based research of multi-location delivery attempts to address issues of: fragmentation; duplication; inconsistency and in-equitability as identified by Winchester & Sterk (2006) in their Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) audit for regional universities. This paper is a work in progress; it explores multi-location delivery of the Graduate Diploma of Education (GDE), the pilot program for the project. Data collection will occur throughout the year ...


Establishment And Persistence Of Species-Rich Patches In A Species-Poor Landscape: Role Of A Structure-Forming Subtidal Barnacle, A. R. Davis, David. W. Ward Jan 2009

Establishment And Persistence Of Species-Rich Patches In A Species-Poor Landscape: Role Of A Structure-Forming Subtidal Barnacle, A. R. Davis, David. W. Ward

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Some sessile invertebrates are capable of maintaining space in barren habitats produced by sea urchins, thereby creating species-rich patches in a species-poor landscape. We sought to determine the role of a large and common barnacle, Austrobalanus imperator, in the establishment and persistence of these species-rich patches. Barnacle density was modified in 2 experiments at sites in southeastern Australia. The first experiment concerned community establishment and involved the addition of barnacles in 4 densities (zero [control], low, medium and high) to plots on vertical rock surfaces. The addition of barnacles at ecologically realistic densities and spatial arrangements rapidly resulted in statistically ...


Sandy Creek Gorge; Humans, Palaeofloods And Landscape Evolution, John D. Jansen, Derek Fabel Jan 2009

Sandy Creek Gorge; Humans, Palaeofloods And Landscape Evolution, John D. Jansen, Derek Fabel

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

No abstract provided.


Relative Importance Of Fuel Management, Ignition Management And Weather For Area Burned: Evidence From Five Landscape-Fire-Succession Models, Geoffrey J. Cary, Mike D. Flannigan, Robert E. Keane, Ross A. Bradstock, Ian D. Davies, James M. Lenihan, Chao Li, Kimberley A. Logan, Russell A. Parsons Jan 2009

Relative Importance Of Fuel Management, Ignition Management And Weather For Area Burned: Evidence From Five Landscape-Fire-Succession Models, Geoffrey J. Cary, Mike D. Flannigan, Robert E. Keane, Ross A. Bradstock, Ian D. Davies, James M. Lenihan, Chao Li, Kimberley A. Logan, Russell A. Parsons

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

The behaviour of five landscape fire models (CAFE, FIRESCAPE, LAMOS(HS), LANDSUM and SEM-LAND) was compared in a standardised modelling experiment. The importance of fuel management approach, fuel management effort, ignition management effort and weather in determining variation in area burned and number of edge pixels burned (a measure of potential impact on assets adjacent to fire-prone landscapes) was quantified for a standardised modelling landscape. Importance was measured as the proportion of variation in area or edge pixels burned explained by each factor and all interactions among them. Weather and ignition management were consistently more important for explaining variation in ...


The Commercial Food Landscape: Outdoor Food Advertising Around Primary Schools In Australia, Bridget P. Kelly, Michelle Cretikos, Kris Rogers, Lesley King Jan 2008

The Commercial Food Landscape: Outdoor Food Advertising Around Primary Schools In Australia, Bridget P. Kelly, Michelle Cretikos, Kris Rogers, Lesley King

Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences - Papers (Archive)

Objective: Food marketing is linked to childhood obesity through its influence on children’s food preferences, purchase requests and food consumption. We aimed to describe the volume and nature of outdoor food advertisements and factors associated with outdoor food advertising in the area surrounding Australian primary schools. Methods: Forty primary schools in Sydney and Wollongong were selected using random sampling within population density and socio-economic strata. The area within a 500m radius of each school was scanned and advertisements coded according to pre-defined criteria, including: food or non-food product advertisement, distance from the school, size and location. Food advertisements were ...


Intimate Australia: Body/Landscape Journals & The Paradox Of Belonging, Lisa Slater Jan 2007

Intimate Australia: Body/Landscape Journals & The Paradox Of Belonging, Lisa Slater

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Early in Body/Landscape Journals Margaret Somerville poses the question '[h]ow do I represent myself and the landscape?'. Throughout the heterogeneous textual topography that is Body/Landscape Journals she attempts to represent, indeed perform, her embodied relationship to place. As a historian, Somerville has collaborated with Aboriginal women to record their oral histories. These collaborative and intimate working processes have seemingly realigned Somerville's desires and writing practices toward Aboriginality. Body/Landscape Journals is an exploration and working through of her desire to write an embodied sense of belonging in Australia. Somerville suggests, citing Elizabeth Ferrier, that 'colonisation is ...


Living In A Land Of Fire, R. J. Whelan, P. Kanowski, M. Gill, A. Andersen Dec 2006

Living In A Land Of Fire, R. J. Whelan, P. Kanowski, M. Gill, A. Andersen

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Fires are an inherent part of the Australian environment. They cannot be prevented, but the risks they pose — to life, health, property and infrastructure, production systems, and to environment values — can be minimised through systematic evaluation and strategic planning and management. Fires have a fundamental and irreplaceable role in sustaining many of Australia’s natural ecosystems and ecological processes, and they are a valuable tool for achieving many land management objectives. However, if they are too frequent or too infrequent, too severe or too mild, or mistimed, they can erode ecosystem ‘health’ and biodiversity and compromise other land management goals ...


Landscape Variability And The Response Of Asian Megadeltas To Environmental Change, Colin D. Woodroffe, Robert J. Nicholls, Yoshiki Saito, Zhongyuan Chen, S L. Goodbred Jan 2006

Landscape Variability And The Response Of Asian Megadeltas To Environmental Change, Colin D. Woodroffe, Robert J. Nicholls, Yoshiki Saito, Zhongyuan Chen, S L. Goodbred

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Deltas, occurring at the mouths of river systems that deposit sediments as they enter the sea, are some of the most dynamic sedimentary environments. They contain a long, and often economically significant, sedimentary record of their response to past episodes of climate and sea-level change. Geological investigation of these deposits, and the processes controlling sedimentation, provide insights into the response of deltas to environmental change, which in turn may offer rational and cost-effective strategies for the sustainable management of natural resources and land use in these dynamic systems in the face of future environmental change.


The Limits Of Art History: Towards An Ecological History Of Landscape Art, A. Gaynor, Ian A. Mclean Jan 2005

The Limits Of Art History: Towards An Ecological History Of Landscape Art, A. Gaynor, Ian A. Mclean

Faculty of Creative Arts - Papers (Archive)

An ecological art history primarily concerns the relationship between the aesthetic and representational functions of landscape art, the environment it depicts and the ecology of this environment. Such investigation should enable us to determine whether particular aesthetic sensibilities or styles are more or less conducive to providing accurate ecological (Le. scientific) information, and what the limits of this information might be. An ecological art history would therefore, of necessity, engage with the science of ecology. Hence it requires an alliance with environmental and ecological historians as well as appropriate scientists. There are few examples of scholars drawing connections between the ...


Landscape Management: Is It The Future?, R. J. Whelan Jan 2004

Landscape Management: Is It The Future?, R. J. Whelan

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

As a Keynote Address at the 2004 Nature Conservation Council Conference, Bushfire in a Changing Environment - New Directions in Management, this paper argues that the landscape is a template with biodiversity assets, and human assets and bushfires overlaid. Two case studies, the Greater Glider and Eastern Bristlebird, are used to illustrate how the impact of bushfire on a species is contingent on it is distributed in the landscape, relative to the locations of its remnant habitat. Mitigation of bushfire effects, using fuel-reduction programs, is a process that also needs to be considered at a landscape scale, and has the potential ...


Is Any Body Home? - Rewriting The Crisis Ofbelonging In Margaret Sommerville's Body/Landscape Journals, Lisa Slater Jan 2002

Is Any Body Home? - Rewriting The Crisis Ofbelonging In Margaret Sommerville's Body/Landscape Journals, Lisa Slater

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Whilst attempting to write a paper about relationships to place, Margaret Somerville suffered from what she calls 'a crisis of the body.'. She was in the early stages of a collaborative writing project with four Aboriginal women in which she was recording their oral histories of their connection to place. She says of the proiect: The women gave me multiple selves, the different I's I want in the text: the pencil as opposed to the mouth, archaeologist, historian, oral historian, and so on, but the new question was how to write a bodily presence?


The Contested Domain Of Pastoralism: Landscape, Work And Outsiders In Central Australia , N. J. Gill Jan 1997

The Contested Domain Of Pastoralism: Landscape, Work And Outsiders In Central Australia , N. J. Gill

Faculty of Science - Papers (Archive)

Extensive cattle grazing has long been the dominant land use in Central Australian rangelands. Today, however, the pastoral landscape is increasingly fractured and contested by indigenous and environmentalist claims on land. Pastoralists in Central Australia are responding to environmentalist claims by reasserting territory. Territory is being constructed with reference to to particular forms of social nature and social space. Identities of insider and outsider have developed. These identities commonly correspond to pastoralists and others, such as conservationists and government, but the place specific nature of pastoralists' environmental knowledge has the potential to render pastoralists as outsiders as well. Moreover, as ...