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Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

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Interpodes: Poland, Tom Keneally And Australian Literary History, Paul Sharrad Jan 2012

Interpodes: Poland, Tom Keneally And Australian Literary History, Paul Sharrad

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

This article is framed by a wider interest in how literary careers are made: what mechanisms other than the personal/biographical and the text-centred evaluations of scholars influence a writer’s choices in persisting in building a succession of works that are both varied and yet form a consistently recognizable “brand.”

Translation is one element in the wider network of “machinery” that makes modern literary publishing. It is a marker of success that might well keep authors going despite lack of sales or negative reviews at home. Translation rights can provide useful supplementary funds to sustain a writer’s output ...


'Not Just Ned: A True History Of The Irish In Australia'. Safeguarding Against 'A Shallower And A Poorer Play', Sharon Crozier-De Rosa Jan 2011

'Not Just Ned: A True History Of The Irish In Australia'. Safeguarding Against 'A Shallower And A Poorer Play', Sharon Crozier-De Rosa

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

As an Irish migrant to Australia, I was particularly keen to visit the ‘Not Just Ned: A true history of the Irish in Australia’ exhibition at the National Museum of Australia in Canberra. As it was, given teaching and research commitments, I just managed to catch the exhibition one week before it closed. (It ran from St Patrick’s Day, 17th March, to 31st July.) So, what struck me immediately on entering the museum was just how crammed full of visitors the exhibition space was. Perhaps a bevy of people, like me, all squeezing in a last minute peek before ...


Maritime Mobilities In Pacific History: Towards A Scholarship Of Betweeness, Frances M. Steel Jan 2010

Maritime Mobilities In Pacific History: Towards A Scholarship Of Betweeness, Frances M. Steel

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

In examining the significance of mobility in the long sweep of human history in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean where seventy per cent of the world's islands are to be found, one cannot but begin with the words of the late Tongan scholar, writer and visionary, Epeli Hau’ofa. In 1993 Hau’ofa proposed a new way of thinking about the region he called Oceania. He critiqued the limitations of an imposed regional imaginary, fostered by imperial rulers, western diplomats, academics, aid donors and the like, which emphasised the smallness, isolation and dependency of tiny islands in ...


Challenges Of The Large Survey Subject: Teaching And Learning How To Read History, Georgine W. Clarsen Jan 2009

Challenges Of The Large Survey Subject: Teaching And Learning How To Read History, Georgine W. Clarsen

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

The large survey subject is a challenge to all humanities, but many of the problems it poses are specific to each discipline. This paper tracks the difficulties of teaching a first year university history subject, as class sizes increase and the traditional tutorial delivery mode is under pressure through fiscal constraints and administrative policy. It utilises the emerging literature on teaching and learning history, History SoTL, which reflects a new interest in disciplinary-specific pedagogical practices. This paper outlines the moves I have made - in keeping with the recent historiographical emphasis on developing students' historical consciousness, rather than simply expecting students ...


Japan’S Original Gay Boom, Mark J. Mclelland Oct 2006

Japan’S Original Gay Boom, Mark J. Mclelland

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

This paper looks at the rise of the category gei boi (gay boy) in postwar Japanese media.


Defining Genocide: Defining History?, Deborah Mayersen Jan 2001

Defining Genocide: Defining History?, Deborah Mayersen

Faculty of Arts - Papers (Archive)

Defining 'genocide' has been a contentious task for historians. Many eminent scholars have argued that it is most useful to work with the legal definition of genocide accepted by the United Nations in 1948, and upon which the Convention on the Prevention and the Punishment of the Crime of Genocide was established. Others have proposed that an alternative definition, broader and less legalistic than the UN definition, would be more useful. However, it is clear on both sides of the debate that it is a choice loaded with consequence. Historians who accept the legal definition of genocide as most appropriate ...