Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

History

Series

Communication

Institution
Publication Year
Publication
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 46

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Law School News: 'Law Isn't A Foreign Language Anymore' 11/24/2020, Michael M. Bowden Nov 2020

Law School News: 'Law Isn't A Foreign Language Anymore' 11/24/2020, Michael M. Bowden

Life of the Law School (1993- )

No abstract provided.


Purposefully Forgetting: Surveying San Diego’S Founding Narrative During The City’S Bicentennial Celebrations Of 1969, Noah Pallmeyer May 2020

Purposefully Forgetting: Surveying San Diego’S Founding Narrative During The City’S Bicentennial Celebrations Of 1969, Noah Pallmeyer

Keck Undergraduate Humanities Research Fellows

The city of San Diego owes much its success and prosperity to the “victories associated with colonization.” This quote comes directly from the current National Park Service description of the San Diego Presidio. This project turns to the 1969 bicentennial celebrations of San Diego’s founding. This was a rhetorically powerful period in San Diego’s historical remembrance. This project argues that native and other marginalized populations were not properly considered in the narrative of San Diego’s founding during these celebrations. To understand why and how these populations failed to be properly considered, this project turns to the narratives ...


The National Intelligencer Validating Cowardice: How A Washington D.C. Newspaper Redefined Defeat Into Republican Victory, Wesley C. Cline Apr 2020

The National Intelligencer Validating Cowardice: How A Washington D.C. Newspaper Redefined Defeat Into Republican Victory, Wesley C. Cline

Student Publications

The fall and burning of Washington D.C. without substantial resistance by the American army and militia was initially an obvious disgrace, however the widely read Washington based newspaper, The National Intelligencer, sought to rewrite this story of defeat into a narrative highlighting republican virtue. Utilizing preexisting stereotypes perpetuated in their paper of British soldiers acting immoral, the staff of The National Intelligencer articulated that the men defending Washington had to return to their individual homes on account of the impending barbarism and savagery of the British invaders, therefore vindicating the militiamen of their lack of resistance and praising their ...


A Brief History Of The Midwest Association For Information Systems: 2005-2020, Chinju Paul, Bryan Hosack, Kevin P. Scheibe Jan 2020

A Brief History Of The Midwest Association For Information Systems: 2005-2020, Chinju Paul, Bryan Hosack, Kevin P. Scheibe

Information Systems and Business Analytics Publications

The Midwest Association for Information Systems (MWAIS), founded in 2005, was recognized as an outstanding chapter of the Association for Information Systems (AIS) for all five years of the award (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, and 2018). MWAIS continues to grow and serve academics in the Midwest and the surrounding region through annual conferences, meetings and receptions at national and international conferences, and through its journal, Journal of the Midwest Association for Information Systems (JMWAIS). This article briefly describes the impetus and actors instrumental in the creation of the association and the current state of MWAIS, its conferences, and the journal.


Make History Accessible: The Case For Youtube, Rohit Kandala May 2019

Make History Accessible: The Case For Youtube, Rohit Kandala

Honors Scholar Theses

Public interest in history is alarmingly low, and this thesis aims to help reverse that trend by recommending the adoption of YouTube as history’s community tool. The majority of this thesis assesses YouTube’s merits as a suitable platform for enthusiasts and professionals alike to share their interests and thereby grow the public’s interest in history. This paper also includes other authors' sentiments on digital history and incorporates it into the argument.


Virtual Reality App Brings History Into The Present, Mark D. Weinstein Jan 2019

Virtual Reality App Brings History Into The Present, Mark D. Weinstein

News Releases

World history is more than just a school subject to Brandon Williams, a Cedarville alumnus who teaches eighth grade world history at Global Impact STEM Academy in Springfield, Ohio. It’s one big intricate story that shows how the lives and experiences of those before us have impacted the way that we live today.


Historical Effects Of Electronic Interfaces, G James Mitchell Dec 2018

Historical Effects Of Electronic Interfaces, G James Mitchell

Publications and Research

Electronic interfaces are a primary tool for most professional and personal communication currently happening. Electronics, like the human mind, are limited by the understanding of executing will, or commands. This can be characterized as “interface limitations” of digital technology. Identifying this bottleneck in technological development has been critical in historical changes to both hardware and software technology. Recent medical research examines a novel user interface to reduce task load. I hypothesize, interface developments that take cues from nonverbal human communication enhance and sustain the significance of those technologies in society. By examining pivotal moments of historical technology we can identify ...


The Lost & Found Game Series: Teaching Medieval Religious Law In Context, Owen Gottlieb, Ian Schreiber Aug 2018

The Lost & Found Game Series: Teaching Medieval Religious Law In Context, Owen Gottlieb, Ian Schreiber

Presentations and other scholarship

Lost & Found is a strategy card-to-mobile game series that teaches medieval religious legal systems with attention to period accuracy and cultural and historical context. The Lost & Found project seeks to expand the discourse around religious legal systems, to enrich public conversations in a variety of communities, and to promote greater understanding of the religious traditions that build the fabric of the United States. Comparative religious literacy can build bridges between and within communities and prepare learners to be responsible citizens in our pluralist democracy. The first game in the series is a strategy game called Lost & Found (high school and ...


Music As Influence: How Has Society Been Shaped By Musical Genres Throughout History?, Cody Poulin May 2018

Music As Influence: How Has Society Been Shaped By Musical Genres Throughout History?, Cody Poulin

Senior Honors Projects

Musical genres have been an integral part in all societies, ancient and contemporary. As time has progressed, so too have the styles and methods of making and consuming music. Modern music presents us with an enormous amount of variety, allowing us to choose which genres we prefer based on our own ideologies and preferences. In order to understand how these genres came to be, one must look at the context through which they were formed. The context includes a variety of factors, such as time period, cultural and social factors, familial influence, and the geographical location where the music emerged ...


Journalism And Human Rights: From The Abolition Of The British Slave Trade, The Aids Crisis, And Injustices Beyond And In-Between, Andrew Henderson Apr 2018

Journalism And Human Rights: From The Abolition Of The British Slave Trade, The Aids Crisis, And Injustices Beyond And In-Between, Andrew Henderson

Mahurin Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

The conception of human rights is one that is enshrined within the shared, collective history of humanity. Encompassing secular traditions, Asian religions and traditions, and monotheistic religions and perspectives as a base for what would come to evolve into universal human rights. Throughout history these traditions and religions have all played a role in shaping where we are at today in terms of human rights. Yet the road which led to a universal declaration of rights was not paved with ease. From the onset of Aristotle, Plato, Hammurabi, other secular authors, and culminating to the end of the French Revolution ...


Print Propaganda Art In World War Ii America, Zeynep Kazmaz Dec 2017

Print Propaganda Art In World War Ii America, Zeynep Kazmaz

Honors Projects in History and Social Sciences

Print Propaganda Art in World War II America World War II started in Europe with Germany’s invasion of Poland on September 1st 1939. Many major countries around the globe were involved in the Second World War. The major Axis Powers were Germany, Japan, and Italy. The major Allied Powers, on the other hand, were Great Britain and France, joined by the Soviet Union in June 1941. The U.S., after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7 1941, would also join the war and become a crucial member of the Allies. During the Second World War, Americans ...


The Future Of Television May Be A Lot Like Its Past, Edward Brennan Nov 2017

The Future Of Television May Be A Lot Like Its Past, Edward Brennan

Other

Like that first card from an old friend, or the roof of twinkling lights over the streets, in Ireland The Late Late Toy Show is one of those signs that Christmas is on its way. Kids are let loose on a grown - up show for a night of singing, dancing and, most importantly, toys. This annual special is ‘event television’. It will be discussed in kitchens, offices and school yards for days afterwards. Television events are set up, across different media, weeks in advance. There are ‘making of’ programmes, press pieces, promos, retrospect ives and so on that tell you ...


How Do You Make A Society Wise?, Barry Jason Mauer Sep 2015

How Do You Make A Society Wise?, Barry Jason Mauer

UCF Forum

A wise society looks after the well-being of its citizenry. In order for there to be a wise society, though, many or most of its citizenry also must be wise since they create the society. But the society must educate its citizens to be wise.


How Journalism Influenced American Public Opinion During The Vietnam War: A Case Study Of The Battle Of Ap Bac, The Gulf Of Tonkin Incident, The Tet Offensive, And The My Lai Massacre, Kyle Hadyniak Apr 2015

How Journalism Influenced American Public Opinion During The Vietnam War: A Case Study Of The Battle Of Ap Bac, The Gulf Of Tonkin Incident, The Tet Offensive, And The My Lai Massacre, Kyle Hadyniak

Honors College

The Vietnam War was a hallmark in journalism history. Not only was newspaper reporting placed in a prominent role, both on the front lines and at home, but for the first time television was also utilized to bring the horrors of war into the living room. Vietnam may have been in Southeast Asia, but half the fighting occurred in the United States because journalists in Vietnam brought a different, pragmatic view to the American public than what the government was providing. The latter’s misleading optimism and, in some cases, outright deception soon ignited an anti-war movement previously unseen on ...


History Curriculum Needs More Coverage Of Black Inventors, Anthony Major Feb 2015

History Curriculum Needs More Coverage Of Black Inventors, Anthony Major

UCF Forum

There is a reason we study Russian and European history as an integral part of our history curriculum. History is required from pre-K to college because it is a vital part of knowing how you and your country came to be.


Dr. Murray Murdoch Begins 50th Year In Classroom, Victoria Stearns Sep 2014

Dr. Murray Murdoch Begins 50th Year In Classroom, Victoria Stearns

News Releases

J. Murray Murdoch, Ph.D., began is 50th year teaching at Cedarville University. Murdoch, now senior professor of history, when the 2014-15 year began earlier this month. Murdoch once served as chair of the history department and men's tennis coach.


The Politics Of Memory, Nicole Maurantonio Jul 2014

The Politics Of Memory, Nicole Maurantonio

Rhetoric and Communication Studies Faculty Publications

This chapter considers the definitional and disciplinary politics surrounding the study of memory, exploring the various sites of memory study that have emerged within the field of communication. Specifically, this chapter reviews sites of memory and commemoration, ranging from places such as museums, monuments, and memorials, to textual forms, including journalism and consumer culture. Within each context, this chapter examines the ways in which these sites have interpreted and reinterpreted traumatic pasts bearing great consequence for national identity. It concludes with a discussion of the challenges set forth by new media for scholars engaging in studies of the politics of ...


Attempting An Affirmative Approach To American Broadcasting: Ideology, Politics, And The Public Telecommunications Facilities Program, Michael W. Huntsberger Jan 2014

Attempting An Affirmative Approach To American Broadcasting: Ideology, Politics, And The Public Telecommunications Facilities Program, Michael W. Huntsberger

Faculty Publications

The Public Telecommunications Facilities Program (PTFP) was the largest source of capital funding for U.S. public broadcasters for nearly fifty years. Between 1963 and 2010, the PTFP distributed more than $800 million to support the construction of public broadcasting facilities. Though the PTFP itself was generally noncontroversial, the fortunes of the program were complicated by the partisan politics of public broadcasting and federal fiscal policy. This study provides evidence of the ambiguous and contingent nature of the American approach to public broadcasting, and demonstrates some of the problems associated with affirmative efforts by government to advance public communication.


An Assignment From Our Students: An Undergraduate View Of The Historical Profession, Edward L. Ayers Sep 2013

An Assignment From Our Students: An Undergraduate View Of The Historical Profession, Edward L. Ayers

History Faculty Publications

The students confidently measured the world through what they knew, and what they knew was popular culture. That culture, often electronic in one way or another, was more pervasive and powerful than anything else they had experienced, including school. The only history books most had seen were high school textbooks, books they universally detested. The students, not surprisingly, liked the idea that historical understanding arrives in many forms


Book Review: Alphabet To Internet: Media In Our Lives, Sue Burzynski Bullard Jan 2013

Book Review: Alphabet To Internet: Media In Our Lives, Sue Burzynski Bullard

Faculty Publications, College of Journalism & Mass Communications

Technology has changed virtually every aspect of communication. As more of us adapt to news and information delivered almost instantly on devices that handily fit into a pocket, we’ve become accustomed to new tools and quick changes. Irving Fang’s second edition of Alphabet to Internet puts it all in perspective, starting with the dawn of writing and including today’s 140-character Tweet. In a word, the impact is mind-boggling.


The Press, Democracy And History: Journalism And Democracy In Transitional Societies, Michael Foley Jan 2013

The Press, Democracy And History: Journalism And Democracy In Transitional Societies, Michael Foley

Doctoral

No abstract provided.


The Impact Of Multimedia And Redundancy On The Efficiency Of History Presentations, Adam Leach May 2012

The Impact Of Multimedia And Redundancy On The Efficiency Of History Presentations, Adam Leach

Doctoral Dissertations and Projects

The use of educational technology to create classroom presentations is already commonplace in American history classes. Therefore, this study focuses on how multimedia presentations can promote efficient instruction specifically, can the employment of the multimedia and redundancy principles (Mayer, 2009) improve the efficiency of student learning in high school history. The goal is to identify methods of multimedia presentation design that maximize the efficiency of instruction, as a gap in literature exists when referencing the performance of adolescents in a public high school and in the study of history. Keeping the focus on efficient learning, this study uses a quasi-experimental ...


U.S. Radio In The 21st Century: Staying The Course In Unknown Territory, Michael Huntsberger Jan 2012

U.S. Radio In The 21st Century: Staying The Course In Unknown Territory, Michael Huntsberger

Faculty Publications

This essay examines the development of the radio industry in the United States as it makes its way into the 21st century. Issues of regulation, technology, commerce, and culture are addressed.


Floyd Gibbons: A Journalistic Force Of Nature In Early 20th Century America, Andrew J. Nelson May 2011

Floyd Gibbons: A Journalistic Force Of Nature In Early 20th Century America, Andrew J. Nelson

Theses from the College of Journalism and Mass Communications

“Floyd Gibbons: A Journalistic Force of Nature in Early 20th Century America” examines some of the key journalistic work of dashing newsman Floyd Gibbons and his status as one of the top reporters to ever file a news story. This thesis will look at the world in which Gibbons inhabited 85 to100 years ago, what made him the man and journalist he was and his work as a reporter for the Chicago Tribune compared to what his competitors at national newspapers wrote.

As a reporter, Gibbons was remarkably aggressive and could be counted upon to get the story, no ...


Fighting For Fairness: The History Of Kentucky’S Local Movements To Enact Fairness Ordinances In 1999, Micah Bennett May 2011

Fighting For Fairness: The History Of Kentucky’S Local Movements To Enact Fairness Ordinances In 1999, Micah Bennett

Mahurin Honors College Capstone Experience/Thesis Projects

This CE/T project explores the histories of the local movements for fairness ordinances which transpired in Kentucky in the year 1999. Fairness ordinances expand local civil rights protections on the basis of ‘sexual orientation’ and sometimes ‘gender identity’ to include lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) peoples and usually protect in the areas of employment, housing, and public accommodations. Four communities in the state considered such laws in 1999: Greater Louisville, Lexington-Fayette, the City of Henderson, and the City of Bowling Green. This thesis takes a holistic approach towards the history of these movements, exploring the procession of chronological ...


The Life And Times Of Gertrude Meth Hochberg, Jessica Lynn Komoroski Apr 2011

The Life And Times Of Gertrude Meth Hochberg, Jessica Lynn Komoroski

Honors Projects in History and Social Sciences

This biographical study fuses together the many different resources and historical documents that help to shed light on the life and times of Gertrude Meth Hochberg, a woman who has often been described as decades ahead of her time. By examining Hochberg’s distinguished career in advertising as well as in public relations at Bryant College, the study demonstrates the important ways that she promoted the advancement of women in higher education, business, and the non-profit sector both at Bryant College and within the wider Rhode Island community.


Ua68/8/1 Potter College Of Arts & Letters History Publications, Wku Archives Dec 2010

Ua68/8/1 Potter College Of Arts & Letters History Publications, Wku Archives

WKU Archives Collection Inventories

Publications created by and about the History Department.


November Uri Community Diversity Project 2010, Joseph A. Santiago, Riley Davis, Richard V. Travisano Dec 2010

November Uri Community Diversity Project 2010, Joseph A. Santiago, Riley Davis, Richard V. Travisano

November Diversity Project

November is National Novel Writing Month. For the first time at the University of Rhode Island November was a month for the URI community to share their stories, poems, art, and photos with the world. The Writing to Model Diversity project intends to connect individuals across cultural boundaries and borders by sharing the stories and experiences that challenge our everyday experiences and the dreams of the future. Built on the efforts of the World Voice series, URI presents a book that shares the stories and culture of the students, faculty, staff, and community members who embrace the idea of becoming ...


November Uri Community Diversity Project 2010, Joseph A. Santiago Mr, Riley Davis Ms, Richard V. Travisano Mr Dec 2010

November Uri Community Diversity Project 2010, Joseph A. Santiago Mr, Riley Davis Ms, Richard V. Travisano Mr

November Diversity Project

November is National Novel Writing Month. For the first time at the University of Rhode Island November was a month for the URI community to share their stories, poems, art, and photos with the world. The Writing to Model Diversity project intends to connect individuals across cultural boundaries and borders by sharing the stories and experiences that challenge our everyday experiences and the dreams of the future. Built on the efforts of the World Voice series, URI presents a book that shares the stories and culture of the students, faculty, staff, and community members who embrace the idea of becoming ...


Review: Karen Ward Mahar (2008): Women Filmmakers In Early Hollywood, Sara Ross Jan 2010

Review: Karen Ward Mahar (2008): Women Filmmakers In Early Hollywood, Sara Ross

Communication, Media & The Arts Faculty Publications

Book review

Mahar, Karen Ward. Women Filmmakers in Early Hollywood. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.

This book will be a useful reference for feminist and film historians looking to expand their understanding of how film and business history can help to explain the gendering of filmmaking.