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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Shared Heritage: An Anthropological Theory And Methodology For Assessing, Enhancing, And Communicating A Future-Oriented Social Ethic Of Heritage Protection, Angela M. Labrador Jan 2013

Shared Heritage: An Anthropological Theory And Methodology For Assessing, Enhancing, And Communicating A Future-Oriented Social Ethic Of Heritage Protection, Angela M. Labrador

Angela M Labrador

A common narrative in the late twentieth–early twenty-first centuries is that historic rural landscapes and cultural practices are in danger of disappearing in the face of modern development pressures. However, efforts to preserve rural landscapes have dichotomized natural and cultural resources and tended to “freeze” these resources in time. They have essentialized the character of both “rural” and “developed” and ignored the dynamic natural and cultural processes that produce them. In this dissertation I outline an agenda for critical and applied heritage research that reframes heritage as a transformative social practice in order to move beyond the hegemonic treatment ...


Entrusting The Commons: Agricultural Land Conservation And Shared Heritage Protection, Angela Labrador Dec 2011

Entrusting The Commons: Agricultural Land Conservation And Shared Heritage Protection, Angela Labrador

Angela M Labrador

The start of the twenty-first century is marked by new levels of globaliza- tion, environmental degradation, and social conflict that are endangering the cultural landscapes and agrarian heritage of rural areas. In the wake of these threats, heritage profes- sionals are imagining new, holistic models for shared cultural and natural heritage protec- tion that support active community engagement around issues of cultural identity, material and ecological sustainability, and shared ethical values. Agricultural land conservation is fertile terrain in which to theorize how heritage protection can contribute to the mobiliza- tion of social cohesion to restore a balanced human ecology. Agrarian ...


Vistas In Common: Sharing Stories About Heritage Landscapes, Angela Labrador Dec 2010

Vistas In Common: Sharing Stories About Heritage Landscapes, Angela Labrador

Angela M Labrador

Rural communities in the United States have faced mounting pressure to develop their local economies in ways that threaten their historic agrarian landscapes and cultural practices. However, these communities are often wary of, if not hostile to, top–down approaches to historic preservation and landscape conservation. Community-engaged heritage protection strategies shift the focus from managing cultural and natural heritage as discrete resources to envisioning heritage and its protection as a form of community development. This paper presents a case study from rural New England in which the intergenerational sharing of narratives about heritage landscapes moves beyond simply commemorating the past ...


Farming Williamsburg: A Collaborative Oral History Project Of Williamsburg's Agrarian Past, Angela Labrador Dec 2010

Farming Williamsburg: A Collaborative Oral History Project Of Williamsburg's Agrarian Past, Angela Labrador

Angela M Labrador

No abstract provided.


Re-Locating Meaning In Heritage Archives: A Call For Participatory Heritage Databases, Angela M. Labrador, Elizabeth S. Chilton Dec 2008

Re-Locating Meaning In Heritage Archives: A Call For Participatory Heritage Databases, Angela M. Labrador, Elizabeth S. Chilton

Angela M Labrador

While the use of online digital archives is increasing in the various heritage-related fields, there are significant problems with traditional digital heritage databases. First, these databases often revolve around collecting and presenting information provided by domain experts and do little to engage end users in the interpretative process. In doing so they centralize the meaning making process and limit authority and, thus, access to non-expert users. Second, they presume a single, knowable community or heritage audience; and third, they presume a single interpretation of an information object, or at least a consensual interpretation from a larger, static group of stakeholders ...