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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Reviving Heritage In Post-Soviet Eastern Europe: A Visual Approach To National Identity, Frances W. Harrison Jul 2012

Reviving Heritage In Post-Soviet Eastern Europe: A Visual Approach To National Identity, Frances W. Harrison

Totem: The University of Western Ontario Journal of Anthropology

This paper seeks to demonstrate the controversial nature of heritage as it is expressed through visual media in the former Soviet republics. I explore Soviet-era emblems of cultural heritage in a post-Soviet context specifically to illuminate their influence on national identity. Drawing from imagery in the Baltic States, Belarus, and Ukraine I demonstrate how today’s lingering symbols of communist nationalism obscure the realization of national identity from being completely non-Soviet. Examples such as Grutas Park, Freedom Square and Minsk’s steadfast urban design illustrate how remembrance of the Soviet past through visual media poses a social conflict to transitional ...


Empowering Indigenous Peoples’ Biocultural Diversity Through World Heritage Cultural Landscapes: A Case Study From The Australian Humid Tropical Forests, Rosemary Hill, Leanne C. Cullen-Unsworth, Leah D. Talbot, Susan Mcintyre-Tamwoy Nov 2011

Empowering Indigenous Peoples’ Biocultural Diversity Through World Heritage Cultural Landscapes: A Case Study From The Australian Humid Tropical Forests, Rosemary Hill, Leanne C. Cullen-Unsworth, Leah D. Talbot, Susan Mcintyre-Tamwoy

Aboriginal Policy Research Consortium International (APRCi)

Australian humid tropical forests have been recognised as globally significant natural landscapes through world heritage listing since 1988. Aboriginal people have occupied these forests and shaped the biodiversity for at least 8000 years. The Wet Tropics Regional Agreement in 2005 committed governments and the region’s Rainforest Aboriginal peoples to work together for recognition of the Aboriginal cultural heritage associated with these forests. The resultant heritage nomination process empowered community efforts to reverse the loss of biocultural diversity. The conditions that enabled this empowerment included: Rainforest Aboriginal peoples’ governance of the process; their shaping of the heritage discourse to incorporate ...