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Articles 1 - 14 of 14

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Men At The Intersection Of Race And Class: Identity, Centrality, And Privilege Attitudes, Bailey Haas Sep 2019

Men At The Intersection Of Race And Class: Identity, Centrality, And Privilege Attitudes, Bailey Haas

Psychology Honors Projects

While previous research has determined that people who have subordinated identities in one domain are more likely to view their dominant identity in another domain as a privilege (Rosette & Tost, 2013), the effect of class identity on privilege awareness at the intersection of race, class, and gender, has not been investigated. Additionally, the centrality of these identities has not been considered as a possible moderator, despite the fact that identity centrality has been shown to moderate the relationship between stereotype appraisals and disidentification with an ethnic or racial identity such that people whose racial or ethnic identities were more central ...


The Purple Wave: Gender And Electoral Outcomes In The 2018 Midterms, Semilla B. Stripp May 2019

The Purple Wave: Gender And Electoral Outcomes In The 2018 Midterms, Semilla B. Stripp

Political Science Honors Projects

This thesis offers an analysis of the relationship between gender and electoral outcomes in the 2018 midterm elections. What role did gender play in the success of candidates for the House of Representatives? In answering this question, I quantify women’s success by analyzing the extent to which female candidates’ vote shares can be attributed to their gender. I find that, while controlling for various electoral and biographical factors, female challengers and open seat candidates performed better than their male counterparts, while female incumbents had no advantage over male incumbents. These outcomes also divided along party lines, with Democratic women ...


Why We Hear About It, And Why We Don't: Power Dynamics And Sexual Harassment Reporting In Us State Legislative Bodies, Halley Norman May 2019

Why We Hear About It, And Why We Don't: Power Dynamics And Sexual Harassment Reporting In Us State Legislative Bodies, Halley Norman

Political Science Honors Projects

The rise to prominence of the #MeToo Movement in October 2017 opened the floodgates to sexual harassment and assault allegations in all fields and levels of employment, across the United States and the world. This movement has crucially revealed is that women often wait months or even years before reporting, if they report at all. Looking at US state legislative bodies, I argue that gendered power dynamics between men and women suppress allegations and promote harassment. Using interviews and data analysis, this paper identifies different factors that may delay or hinder reporting, with a specific focus on gendered power dynamics ...


Is Addressing Climate Change Women's Work? Political Leadership And The Climate, Isabella Soparkar Apr 2017

Is Addressing Climate Change Women's Work? Political Leadership And The Climate, Isabella Soparkar

Environmental Studies Honors Projects

In an era when climate science is politically controversial, recent polling data shows that American women are more concerned about climate change than their male counterparts. This research uses both voting record analysis and qualitative interviews with legislators to examine whether the observed gender gap on climate change persists among elected political leaders. Linear and logistic regression results show no statistically significant climate change gender gap within legislative voting behavior, and interviews suggest that though women may be more willing to collaborate on climate change policy than men, subtle gender differences are often overridden by partisanship. However, findings suggest that ...


Gëm Sa Bop: Performing Ethics, Claiming Space And Grabbing The Mic As Senegalese Female Hip-Hop Artists, Sophie M. Keane Apr 2016

Gëm Sa Bop: Performing Ethics, Claiming Space And Grabbing The Mic As Senegalese Female Hip-Hop Artists, Sophie M. Keane

Anthropology Honors Projects

The hip-hop cultural movement has taken hold of youth communities around the world. DJs, taggers/graffiti artists, rappers/MCs, and breakers/dancers exist in every corner of the globe; Dakar, Senegal is no different. Hip-hop has historically privileged male bodies, but female artists in Dakar “grab the mic” to unapologetically express themselves and disrupt the systemic silencing of their voices. I argue that Senegalese female hip-hop artists navigate and claim gendered spaces by carving out creative spaces of their own and grabbing the mic. Gëm sa bop, a Wolof phrase meaning “believe in yourself,” grounds the ethics — how an actor ...


Religion And Well-Being: Differences By Identity And Practice, Marium H. Ibrahim Apr 2016

Religion And Well-Being: Differences By Identity And Practice, Marium H. Ibrahim

Psychology Honors Projects

Religion is often related to greater psychological well-being in college students (Burris et al., 2009). However, across studies, researchers have conceptualized “religion” in different ways. Despite the fact that religious identity and practice tend to be related, these aspects of religion may be differentially related to well-being (Lopez, Huynh & Fuligni, 2011). In addition, the relationship between religion and well-being may differ based on societal factors such as race and gender (Diener, Tay & Myers, 2011). In this study, 157 undergraduate students completed measures of religious identity, religious practice, public regard (the extent to which people feel that their race and gender ...


Gender, Media, And The White House: An Examination Of Gender In The Media Coverage Of Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, And Ted Cruz In The 2016 Elections, Rose E. Allen Apr 2016

Gender, Media, And The White House: An Examination Of Gender In The Media Coverage Of Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, And Ted Cruz In The 2016 Elections, Rose E. Allen

Political Science Honors Projects

This paper examines the role of gender in the media coverage of Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, and Ted Cruz in the 2016 election cycle. Analyzing newspaper articles, Twitter pages, and campaign advertisements, I compare the media coverage of these three candidates to their own campaign messages. My findings reveal that Clinton received more personal coverage than Sanders or Cruz, despite less of an emphasis on personal characteristics in her own campaign materials. I also find that Clinton received less coverage on “feminine issues” such as women’s health and paid family leave, despite her own campaign’s focus on these ...


Female Reverberations Online: An Analysis Of Tunisian, Egyptian, And Moroccan Female Cyberactivism During The Arab Spring, Brittany Landorf May 2014

Female Reverberations Online: An Analysis Of Tunisian, Egyptian, And Moroccan Female Cyberactivism During The Arab Spring, Brittany Landorf

International Studies Honors Projects

Digital technologies and social media networks have the potential to open new platforms for women in the public domain. During the 2011 Arab Spring revolutions, female cyberactivists used digital technologies to participate in and at times led protests. This thesis examines how Tunisian, Egyptian, and Moroccan female cyberactivists deployed social media networks to write a new body politic online. It argues throughout that female activists turned to online activism to disrupt gender relations in their countries and demand social, religious, economic, and political gender parity.


Deciphering A Duality: Understanding Conflicting Standards In Sex & Violence Censorship In U.S. Obscenity Law, Rushabh P. Bhakta May 2012

Deciphering A Duality: Understanding Conflicting Standards In Sex & Violence Censorship In U.S. Obscenity Law, Rushabh P. Bhakta

Political Science Honors Projects

This research examines the division in US obscenity law that enables strict sex censorship while overlooking violence. By investigating the social and legal development of obscenity in US culture, I argue that the contemporary duality in obscenity censorship standards arose from a family of forces consisting of faith, economy, and identity in early American history. While sexuality ingrained itself in American culture as a commodity in need of regulation, violence was decentralized from the state and proliferated. This phenomenon led to a prioritization of suppressing sexual speech over violent speech. This paper traces the emergence this duality and its source.


Time For Myself, Time For Others: Gender Differences In The Meaning Of Retirement, Kate L. Lanning Jan 2012

Time For Myself, Time For Others: Gender Differences In The Meaning Of Retirement, Kate L. Lanning

Sociology Honors Projects

Research has demonstrated that work is a meaningful activity that contributes to peoples' identities. This meaning, however, may depend on the stage of the life course that one is in, and may be gendered. To contribute to understanding the social meaning of work and potentially gendered life-course transitions, I examine the experiences of older adults with work and retirement. Through interviews with both retired and working older adults, I examine whether and how older men and women differ from each other in the workplace and in retirement. Men and women face different challenges if they continue to work and when ...


New Silhouettes Of African Women: How Women In Botswana Juggle Work And Home-Based Roles, Joanna Dobson May 2011

New Silhouettes Of African Women: How Women In Botswana Juggle Work And Home-Based Roles, Joanna Dobson

Anthropology Honors Projects

Global discourse on Africa largely fails to recognize the important and transformative roles of women working in professional careers. This thesis uses life history and ethnography to document the lives of women in Botswana who are juggling paid employment and raising children. The culturally-specific ways in which they negotiate work and home-based roles have much to contribute to larger understandings of women, work, and motherhood. I argue that a new faction of Botswana’s middle class is emerging among women in Gaborone. The women in this case study exemplify this new group. Members of this class are characterized by their ...


Designing More Inclusive Streets: The Bicycle, Gender, And Infrastructure, Ainsley Henry Judge May 2011

Designing More Inclusive Streets: The Bicycle, Gender, And Infrastructure, Ainsley Henry Judge

Geography Honors Projects

The number of bike commuters is increasing in cities across the U.S., but men are cycling at double the rate of women cyclists. This paper focuses on how different bike infrastructure and street design options relate to gender and how streets can welcome or inhibit different users. A survey conducted in October of 2010, analyzes the ways in which men and women cyclists in the Twin Cities prioritize and perceive characteristics of the street. The results and culminating research address how to most effectively and inclusively incorporate all cyclists into the urban geographic setting.


Modern, Indigenous, Woman: Female Agriculturalists, Sustainability, And Development In The Highlands Of Ecuador, Clare H. Jacky Apr 2007

Modern, Indigenous, Woman: Female Agriculturalists, Sustainability, And Development In The Highlands Of Ecuador, Clare H. Jacky

Geography Honors Projects

The country of Ecuador, while it possesses rich societal and environmental diversity, is challenged by political instability, economic crises, and areas of severe environmental degradation. For many reasons, including global economic flows, agricultural change, and economic collapse within the country, the participation and recognition of indigenous agricultural groups in rural areas of Ecuador has been transformed such that the roles, actions, and goals of women in many rural areas of Ecuador have evolved. This project examines changing agricultural systems in a highland region of Ecuador, focusing on the participation and experiences of indigenous agriculturalists, especially the participation and experiences of ...


An Absolutely Different Life: Locating Disability, Motherhood, And Local Power In Rural Siberia, Cassandra S. Hartblay May 2006

An Absolutely Different Life: Locating Disability, Motherhood, And Local Power In Rural Siberia, Cassandra S. Hartblay

Anthropology Honors Projects

This thesis- an ethnography of mothers of children with disabilities in an impoverished Siberian village- examines culturally specific constructions of disability, gender, and motherhood in post-Soviet Russia. Employing theories of the semiotic self, liminality, and the life course, I meld Anthropology, Disability Studies, and post-Soviet area studies to demonstrate that, in the context of the Siberian village, the stigma of disability is branded on the mother of an impaired child. In organizing an independent, grassroots school for their children, these mothers create an autonomous space, reclaiming social personhood and challenging power structures by appropriating rhetoric of the Soviet 'women's ...