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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

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Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Non-Suicidal Self-Injury And Suicidal Behaviour In Children And Adolescents Accessing Residential Or Intensive Home-Based Mental Health Services, Michele Preyde, Hanna Watkins, Nicklaus Csuzdi, Jeff Carter, Kelly Lazure, Sara White, Randy Penney, Graham Ashbourne, Gary Cameron, Karen Frensch Nov 2012

Non-Suicidal Self-Injury And Suicidal Behaviour In Children And Adolescents Accessing Residential Or Intensive Home-Based Mental Health Services, Michele Preyde, Hanna Watkins, Nicklaus Csuzdi, Jeff Carter, Kelly Lazure, Sara White, Randy Penney, Graham Ashbourne, Gary Cameron, Karen Frensch

Partnerships for Children and Families Project

Objective: There is a dearth of Canadian research with clinical samples of youth who self-harm, and no studies could be located on self-harm in children and youth accessing residential or intensive home-based treatment. The purposes of this report were to explore the proportion and characteristics of children and youth identified as self-harming at admission by clinicians compared to youth not identified as self-harming, compare self-harming children to adolescents, and to compare caregiver ratings of self-harm at intake to clinician ratings at admission.

Method: This report was developed from a larger longitudinal, observational study involving 210 children and youth accessing residential ...


Discerning Reported Suicide Attempts Within A Youthful Offender Population, Christopher A. Mallett, Leaanne Derigne, Linda M. Quinn, Patricia A. Stoddard Dare Feb 2012

Discerning Reported Suicide Attempts Within A Youthful Offender Population, Christopher A. Mallett, Leaanne Derigne, Linda M. Quinn, Patricia A. Stoddard Dare

Social Work Faculty Publications

With suicide being the third leading cause of death among young people, early identification of risk is critical, particularly for those involved with the juvenile courts. In this study of court-involved youth (N = 433) in two Midwest counties, logistic regression analysis identified some expected and unexpected findings of important demographic, educational, mental health, child welfare, and juvenile court-related variables that were linked to reported suicide attempts. Some of the expected suicide attempt risk factors for these youth included prior psychiatric hospitalization and related mental health services, residential placement, and diagnoses of depression and alcohol dependence. However, the most unexpected finding ...