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2012

University of Nevada, Las Vegas

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Articles 1 - 30 of 434

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Ethnic And Gender Differences In Psychosocial Factors In Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islanders, And Asian American Adults With Type 2 Diabetes, Jillian Inouye, Dongmei Li, James Davis, Richard Arakaki Dec 2012

Ethnic And Gender Differences In Psychosocial Factors In Native Hawaiian, Other Pacific Islanders, And Asian American Adults With Type 2 Diabetes, Jillian Inouye, Dongmei Li, James Davis, Richard Arakaki

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

This study examined the differences between 207 Asians and Native Hawaiian, other Pacific Islanders (NHOPI) with type 2 diabetes among various psychosocial measures. Responses to five multivariable regression models including the Diabetes Quality of Life Questionnaire (DQOL) and Short Form -36® Health Survey (SF-36) were analyzed. Differences were determined by linear contrasts in the multivariate linear regression models after adjusted for multiple demographic and socioeconomic variables. Compared to Asians, NHOPIs perceived a lower impact of diabetes on their quality of life; highlighting differences in perceptions of self-efficacy and self-care activities. Females did better on their diet while males perceived better ...


Housing, The Neighborhood Environment, And Physical Activity Among Older African Americans, Lonnie Hannon Iii, Patricia Sawyer, Richard M. Allman Dec 2012

Housing, The Neighborhood Environment, And Physical Activity Among Older African Americans, Lonnie Hannon Iii, Patricia Sawyer, Richard M. Allman

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

Abstract

This study examines the association of neighborhood environment, as measured by housing factors, with physical activity among older African Americans. Context is provided on the effects of structural inequality as an inhibitor of health enhancing neighborhood environments. The study population included African Americans participating in the UAB Study of Aging (n=433). Participants demonstrated the ability to walk during a baseline in-home assessment. The strength and independence of housing factors were assessed using neighborhood walking for exercise as the outcome variable. Sociodemographic data, co-morbid medical conditions, and rural/urban residence were included as independent control factors. Homeownership, occupancy, and ...


Racial Disparities In Pain Management In Primary Care, Miriam Ezenwa Dec 2012

Racial Disparities In Pain Management In Primary Care, Miriam Ezenwa

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice

This descriptive, cross-sectional, secondary data analysis was conducted to examine racial disparities in pain management of primary care patients with chronic nonmalignant pain using chronic opioid therapy. Data from 891 patients, including 201 African Americans and 691 Caucasians were used to test an explanatory model for these disparities. We predicted that: (1) African American patients would report worse pain management and poor quality of life (QOL) than Caucasians; (2) the association between race and pain management would be mediated by perceived discrimination relating to hopelessness; and (3) poor pain management would negatively affect QOL. Results revealed significant differences between African ...


Nevada Interagency Volunteer Program: Helping Hands Across Public Lands—Phase Ii: Final Project Report, December 31, 2012, Margaret N. Rees Dec 2012

Nevada Interagency Volunteer Program: Helping Hands Across Public Lands—Phase Ii: Final Project Report, December 31, 2012, Margaret N. Rees

Get Outdoors Nevada

  • Maintained a central clearinghouse created for Southern Nevada public lands volunteers, including: ─ an online volunteer data-management application (Volgistics) adopted and customized for the program and populated with 8,500 active and 961 mailing list volunteer records ─ a community outreach Web site that currently averages 8,230 pages viewed per month since July 2007 and has aided in the recruitment of 11,943 volunteers ─ updated website to word press for sustainability ─ branding development and marketing and outreach tool creation
  • Updated Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for all areas of Interagency Volunteer Program Management—recruitment, training, recognition, retention of volunteers, event planning, and ...


Sndo Hector's Helpers Youth Engaging The Community Through Social Media: Annual Progress Report, Period Covering June 1, 2012 - December 31, 2012, Margaret N. Rees Dec 2012

Sndo Hector's Helpers Youth Engaging The Community Through Social Media: Annual Progress Report, Period Covering June 1, 2012 - December 31, 2012, Margaret N. Rees

Anti-littering Programs

The Hector’s Helpers Youth Engaging the Community through Social Media project was designed to develop civic and environmental stewardship skills as students receive training in administering social media accounts (e.g., Facebook, twitter, Youtube). The project is an extension of the Hector’s Helpers program developed through a cooperative agreement and run under the branding of Don’t Trash Nevada. Participants in the project are known as the Social Media Squad (SMS). The following activities were completed:

  • Supervision of youth completing the pilot program initiated in an earlier cooperative agreement
  • Recruitment of youth to apply for the Social Media ...


World Hunger, Keegan Flanigan, Garrett Cruz Dec 2012

World Hunger, Keegan Flanigan, Garrett Cruz

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

U.S. to Mauritania Comparisons

  • 40% of food processed in the United States is thrown away
  • 1.3 billion tons of food, more than 1/3 of the world's food production is lost or wasted annually.
  • If food waste in the United States was reduced by 15%, the amount of food could feed 25 million people (five times the population of Mauritania) for a year.


Water Use In Las Vegas, Gram Bazylinski Dec 2012

Water Use In Las Vegas, Gram Bazylinski

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

How Much Water Does Las Vegas Use?

Water Use Per Capita

The average household in Southern Nevada uses about 222 gallons of water per day. This has recently dropped from using 314 gallons of water per day. The southern Nevada Water Authority hopes that by the year 2035, water use will have dropped down to 199 gallons per day for each household.

The majority of Southern Nevada’s water goes to residential use, both indoor and outdoor. Because of this, restrictions have been placed on certain aspects of water use such as the amount of lawn a household can own ...


Hunger In America, Kamay Tu Dec 2012

Hunger In America, Kamay Tu

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

Hunger in America is becoming more and more an issue. Although the advance from hunting and gathering to farming and agriculture should solve this issue, it hasn't. The question is why?


Life Cafe: Food Conservation And Health, Michelle Panko Dec 2012

Life Cafe: Food Conservation And Health, Michelle Panko

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

Challenges of Health and Conservation in Las Vegas

  • Las Vegas is a very large and busy city, with locals operating on a very hectic agenda often times resulting with a need for instant gratification.
  • Because of this, many food industries in Las Vegas tend to distribute unhealthy foods in large Quantities.
  • According to the Springs preserve NV blog, Las wastes produces 9,000 tons of trash a day.


Water Consumption In Southern Nevada, Paul Conyers Dec 2012

Water Consumption In Southern Nevada, Paul Conyers

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

With its massive hotels, casinos, restaurants, and dramatic architecture it can be easy to forget that Las Vegas resides in the middle of a desert receiving just 4.5 inches of rain per year. Its population has grown immensely to nearly 2 million as of 2012 and that is without including the more than 30 million tourists visiting every year. With this growth more and more water is needed to keep yards and golf courses green, to keep the fountains of Bellagio flowing, to support the habitats of Mandalay Bay and the Flamingo, and to allow Las Vegas to maintain ...


Moving Forward: Preventing Water Shortage For Nevada, Sandra Blandon, Brianna Lyon Dec 2012

Moving Forward: Preventing Water Shortage For Nevada, Sandra Blandon, Brianna Lyon

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

Southern Nevada is located in the arid Mojave Desert, which averages about 4 inches of rain each year. Southern Nevada gets about 90% of its water supply from the Colorado River. Seven western states and Mexico share the river. This means that The Colorado River provides water to 25 million people.


Feast And Famine In A Global World Food: Compare And Contrast: Palms Bistro Buffet Vs. Bally's Steakhouse, Selina Abai Dec 2012

Feast And Famine In A Global World Food: Compare And Contrast: Palms Bistro Buffet Vs. Bally's Steakhouse, Selina Abai

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

The strip is known for its flashing lights, water show, Hotels & Casinos, and the restaurants and buffets. Within the city of Las Vegas there are 2,187 restaurants and over 300 buffets. The food chain in Las Vegas is rapidly growing with more industries and companies opening.


Tap Water Treatment And Testing, Matt Oswalt Dec 2012

Tap Water Treatment And Testing, Matt Oswalt

COLA 100: Feast and Famine In a Global World Poster Assignment

My research is focused on how the water we drink is cleaned and filtered and whether or not it is safe to drink the water from the tap.


Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon Dec 2012

Conclusion-Cola And Cartoons: A Showcase Of Freshman Research At Unlv, Cian T. Mcmahon

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The decisions we make about politics and society are influenced by what we see and hear in the news. That is why political cartoons are so important. They present clear opinions on complicated matters in ways that transcend everyday language.


“Mongolian Octopus—Its Grip On Australia”, Ron Thornton Dec 2012

“Mongolian Octopus—Its Grip On Australia”, Ron Thornton

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in the Sydney based The Bulletin Magazine on August 21, 1886, “The Mongolian Octopus – His Grip on Australia” cartoon was pointedly used as a form of propaganda against Mongolian & Chinese immigration. The cartoon illustrates an octopus with a human head and eight outstretched arms. On each of these arms is a different term, such as typhoid or immorality. These terms, along with the octopus itself, all portrayed racist views of Chinese and Mongolian immigrants.


“Welcome To All”, Samantha Hamika Dec 2012

“Welcome To All”, Samantha Hamika

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

In the cartoon “Welcome to All” by Joseph Keppler published in the magazine Puck on April 28, 1880, it portrays Uncle Sam standing in front of an ark with his arms open to immigrants, who are lined up in front of the ark. There are signs next to the ark that claim all good things about America that other countries don’t have. There is also a big, black, evil-looking ghost blending in with the clouds in the background that is staring down on the immigrants.


“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada Dec 2012

“Where The Blame Lies”, Sahar Nawabzada

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge Magazine on April 4th 1891, the cartoon Where the Blame Lies shows a flood of immigrants arriving to New York City while a disapproving Uncle Sam looks on at them. The cartoon shows a Supreme Court Judge that is imploring Uncle Sam to amend the constitution to restrict immigration. When looking at the immigrants themselves, each immigrant has words such as “Anarchist” or “Socialist” written on their clothing to convey the negative attributes immigrants bring to the country. On the stage is a piece of paper that reads “Mafia in New Orleans, Anarchists in Chicago, and Socialists ...


“It’S Going To Be Just Turned Around”, Zachary Meyer Dec 2012

“It’S Going To Be Just Turned Around”, Zachary Meyer

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Appearing in the Columbus Dispatch on April 21st 1924, Ray Evans’ cartoon titled “It’s Going to Be Just Turned Around” supports the Immigration Act of 1924 by displaying two different worlds in which different immigration policies are being applied: One with the immigration act, and one without.


“Be Just—Even To John Chinaman”, Prinz Esteban Dec 2012

“Be Just—Even To John Chinaman”, Prinz Esteban

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge Magazine on June 3, 1893 the “Be Just—Even to John Chinaman” cartoon is used to represent the harsh treatment felt by many Chinese immigrants as they entered into the United States with the Chinese Exclusion Act, which was renewed by the Geary Act in 1892. The cartoon displays a Chinese man as he is being forced out of “Miss Columbia's school.” The cartoon itself is full of irony as the other students in the class were also heavily discriminated against in American history.


“They Are Pretty Safe There”, Madison Palmer Dec 2012

“They Are Pretty Safe There”, Madison Palmer

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The year of 1882 was a intense year for Chinese migrants. This was the year that the Chinese Exclusion act was passed thus banning Chinese immigration to the United States. This hatred for the Chinese began around the time of the building of the transcontinental railroad. This was because so many Chinese were moving to the states to help with the railroad that white males began to feel “insecure” or “frightened” that the Chinese would take all the American jobs and women.


“The High Tide Of Immigration—A National Menace”, Mackenzie Brandenburger Dec 2012

“The High Tide Of Immigration—A National Menace”, Mackenzie Brandenburger

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

This cartoon “The High Tide of Immigration – A National Menace” appeared in the humor magazine Judge in 1903. It reflects the alarm among some Americans at the growing number of immigrants from countries in Southern and Eastern Europe such as Italy, Russia, Austria, Hungary and declining number of immigrants from countries in northern and western Europe such as Ireland and Germany.


“Uncle Sam’S Thanksgiving Dinner”, Kenosha Gee Dec 2012

“Uncle Sam’S Thanksgiving Dinner”, Kenosha Gee

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in the November 22nd, 1860 issue of Harper Weekly, by Thomas Nast (known for the invention of the character Uncle Sam) Nast captured and celebrated the ethnic diversity and envision the political equality of citizens of the American republic. Even though it seems as if the picture shows that everyone race (African, Native, French, German, Arab, British, Chinese, Italian, etc.) are getting along, there are many hidden messages that lies in this photo. Nast aims the cartoon at the ratification of the 15th amendment to the U.S. Constitution. On the table is a monument to “self- government” and ...


“The Immigrant: Is He An Acquisition Or A Detriment?”, Karla Garcia-Cardenas Dec 2012

“The Immigrant: Is He An Acquisition Or A Detriment?”, Karla Garcia-Cardenas

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Judge magazine on September 19, 1903, “The Immigrant: Is He An Acquisition Or A Detriment?” cartoon reveals the opposing viewpoints of seven major interest groups towards immigration. Individuals surround the immigrants located in the center, expressing their judgments through signs and identification labels. In general, the cartoon depicts the benefits and drawbacks of immigration in the early twentieth century.


“The Most Recently Discovered Wild Beast”, Jenelle Tamio Dec 2012

“The Most Recently Discovered Wild Beast”, Jenelle Tamio

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

This Political cartoon is labeled "The Most Recently Discovered Wild Beast.” This cartoon depicts Irish as jail bound hooligans. In this political cartoon simianization is used among the Irish-American. Simianization is the way cartoonists portray humans as having monkey like features.


“The Mortar Of Assimilation—And The One Element That Won’T Mix”, Jenna Downs Dec 2012

“The Mortar Of Assimilation—And The One Element That Won’T Mix”, Jenna Downs

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in Puck magazine on June 26, 1889, “The Mortar of Assimilation And The One Element That Just Won’t Mix” cartoon was a perfect exhibit of the Americans view on the Irish immigration to the United States. In the melting pot several different kinds of Americans can be spotted, but the one Irishman is standing on the edge of the pot holding a knife and a flag.


“Another Triumph For Jonathon—Biggest Reptile In The Universe”, Frances Skeirik Dec 2012

“Another Triumph For Jonathon—Biggest Reptile In The Universe”, Frances Skeirik

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

“Another Triumph for Jonathan- Biggest Reptile in the Universe” was published in Judy Newspaper on May 17th, 1882. In this cartoon, Uncle Sam sits back complacently in his rocking chair while this huge sea monster from the United States swims ashore of another country. On the beast is written “American Feniansim”. Looking even closer in the hand of this sea monster is a knife with the word “Assassination” written upon it. Lastly, ashore of the other country is a man holding a lasso in hopes of catching this monster but he is having no luck whatsoever due to the size ...


“Looking Backward”, Flor De Liz Regalado Dec 2012

“Looking Backward”, Flor De Liz Regalado

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

“Looking Backwards”, the controversial cartoon from Puck Magazine, was published on January 11, 1893. Composed by the founder of Puck Magazine himself, Joseph Keppler, created the cartoon that portrays the arguable rights of foreign visitors, also referred to as immigrants. The image represents an immigrant who has stepped off of a ship and entered into a foreign land and greeted with a generous “goodbye”, by those whom once were in his position and are now successful. Behind the figures that rejected the newcomer, are shadows of themselves being casted as they were once immigrants, too.


“The Fool Pied Piper”, Elizabeth Stevenson Dec 2012

“The Fool Pied Piper”, Elizabeth Stevenson

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

This cartoon entitled “The Fool Pied Piper,” that was published in Puck Magazine June 2, 1909 shows American distaste for immigration to the United States. It portrays Uncle Sam as the Pied Piper, leading rats across the ocean toward the Statue of Liberty with a pipe that is labeled “Lax Immigration Laws.” The rats are labeled “Murderer,” “Thief”, “Kidnapper,” and “Assassin.” Some rats are carrying papers that say “The Black Hand.” Meanwhile, leaders and citizens of the countries the rats are leaving are cheering the rats’ departure.


“The Balance Of Trade With Great Britain Seems To Be Still Against Us”, Eric Corral Dec 2012

“The Balance Of Trade With Great Britain Seems To Be Still Against Us”, Eric Corral

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

Published in New York’s Harper’s Weekly on April 28, 1883, “The Balance of Trade with Great Britain Seems to be Still Against Us” depicts the rising tensions between immigrants, particularly Irish, coming to the United States from Great Britain. During the Great Famine (1845-1852) many Irishmen under the rule of the Crown emigrated to the United States. Tensions began to flare between both parties once the Irish nationalist group, “The Fenians,” situated in the United States, began to terrorize Great Britain. The United States felt its Irish immigrants were implicated, and Great Britain felt that the United States ...


“Colonists And Convicts”, Dakota Hoskins Dec 2012

“Colonists And Convicts”, Dakota Hoskins

History Undergraduate Research (COLA)

The “Colonists and Convicts” cartoon debuted in the British magazine called Punch in October 1864. The cartoon brings to life the bickering that occurred between the Australian colonists and the British officers. It gives off the idea that the colonists were more annoyed with the officers than the convicts themselves. The rugged Australians were fed up with being forced fed the British rulings.