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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2012

Portland State University

Population forecasting -- Oregon -- Portland Metropolitan Area

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Demographic Trends And The Regional Economy, Sheila A. Martin Jul 2012

Demographic Trends And The Regional Economy, Sheila A. Martin

Institute of Portland Metropolitan Studies Publications

A .pdf version of a PowerPoint presentation to the Daily Journal of Commerce's Builder Banker Breakfast on February 7, 2012.


Critical Issues 2005, Craig Wollner, Deborah Elliott Jan 2012

Critical Issues 2005, Craig Wollner, Deborah Elliott

Institute of Portland Metropolitan Studies Publications

Biennially, the Institute of Portland Metropolitan Studies (IMS) undertakes to identify the most compelling concerns, problems, and dilemmas facing citizens of the Portland metropolitan region. The region is defined as Clackamas, Colwnbia, Multnomah, Washington, and Yamhill Counties and Clark County in Washington. IMS staff analyzes the results of two Critical Issues list surveys, one of area residents at large conducted by the Survey Research Laboratory (SRL) of Portland State University (pSU), and the other a mail survey of regional opinion leaders. The opinion leaders are elected and appointed officials serving in jurisdictions throughout the six-county metropolitan region, academic experts in ...


Environment, Economy, And Equity: Can We Find A Language For Fairness In Regional Planning?, John Provo, Jill Fuglister Jan 2012

Environment, Economy, And Equity: Can We Find A Language For Fairness In Regional Planning?, John Provo, Jill Fuglister

Institute of Portland Metropolitan Studies Publications

Metropolitan Portland is often cited as a model for regional planning and growth management. In the 19905, both academics and the popular press "discovered" the Portland region, connecting our quality of life--vibrant urban places, natural beauty, and healthy economy--with our unique forms of regional cooperation and land use planning. Metropolitan Portland became the avatar of an emerging New Regionalism, a movement characterized not only by its spatial nature, but also by an interest in holistic solutions integrating a variety of issue areas. One central tenant of this movement is the ability of regional policies to address growing inequities and inefficiencies ...