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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Religion And Infant Mortality In The United States: A Community-Level Investigation Of Denominational Variations, Ginny Garcia-Alexander, John P. Bartkowski, Xiaohe Xu May 2012

Religion And Infant Mortality In The United States: A Community-Level Investigation Of Denominational Variations, Ginny Garcia-Alexander, John P. Bartkowski, Xiaohe Xu

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

A burgeoning body of scholarship has explored the influence of community-level religiosity (religious ecology) on various health outcomes. In this study, we enlist data from the Glenmary Census of Churches, county-level infant mortality rates from the NCHS, and select Census data to investigate the relationship between infant mortality and religion. Our study employs both aggregate analyses of major faith traditions (conservative Protestant, mainline Protestant, Catholic, and other religions) as well as decomposition analyses that subdivide conservative Protestants into four variants: fundamentalist, evangelical, Pentecostal, and other conservative Protestant. Our preliminary findings suggest that counties with a high prevalence of Catholic and ...


The Subtleties Of Social Exclusion: Race, Social Class, And The Exclusion Of Blacks In A Racially Mixed Neighborhood, Daniel Monroe Sullivan, Jonathan Picarsic Apr 2012

The Subtleties Of Social Exclusion: Race, Social Class, And The Exclusion Of Blacks In A Racially Mixed Neighborhood, Daniel Monroe Sullivan, Jonathan Picarsic

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

We use interviews, content analysis, and surveys to describe how a neighborhood association in a racially mixed neighborhood in Portland, Oregon (USA) subtly excludes many blacks from being full members of the neighborhood. In contrast to explicit cases of social exclusion, this neighborhood association excludes blacks without ever referring to race. They instead justify their actions—e.g., helping close down a black social club and discouraging more affordable housing—based on such nonracial goals as increasing homeownership, minimizing crime, and maximizing “economic diversity.” We argue that without the inclusion of black residents and their neighborhood organizations (e.g., churches ...


Apprenticeship Needs Assessment In Heavy Highway Construction Workforce, Maura Kelly, Lindsey Wilkinson Jan 2012

Apprenticeship Needs Assessment In Heavy Highway Construction Workforce, Maura Kelly, Lindsey Wilkinson

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

To gain an understanding of the reasons that women and men of color are not retained in apprenticeships relevant to the heavy highway trades at the same rate as are white men. Particular attention shall be focused on the reasons that apprentices refuse job assignments/dispatches, leave assignments before the contractor’s job is finished, and retention in the third period of apprenticeships. Differences in motivations, the nature of obstacles faced and the type and effectiveness of particular supports to affect retention rates shall be considered, with attention to the potentially different experience of people in different trades and regions ...


Beyond The Shadow Of White Privilege?: The Socioeconomic Attainments Of Second Generation South Asian Americans, Hyeyoung Woo, Arthur Sakamoto, Isao Takei Jan 2012

Beyond The Shadow Of White Privilege?: The Socioeconomic Attainments Of Second Generation South Asian Americans, Hyeyoung Woo, Arthur Sakamoto, Isao Takei

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Despite numerous studies of second generation minorities in recent years, South Asian Americans have been largely ignored. Using the most recent data available from the US Census Bureau, we investigate the socioeconomic attainments of second generation South Asian Americans. We find that their average levels of education, wages, and occupational attainment exceed those of non-Hispanic whites. Contrary to the “model minority myth” view, second generation South Asian Americans remain slightly advantaged relative to non-Hispanic whites in terms of labor market success net of age, education, and region of residence. These results are also inconsistent with discussions of white privilege that ...


Suicide Mortality Risk In The United States By Sex And Age Groups, Hyeyoung Woo, Jarron M. Saint Onge, Daniel Standridge Jan 2012

Suicide Mortality Risk In The United States By Sex And Age Groups, Hyeyoung Woo, Jarron M. Saint Onge, Daniel Standridge

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

Overall individual health has been critically improved over the last century in the United States. However, among the leading causes of death, only suicide rates show a significant increase in recent decades and the increases have been even greater among females. This study is designed to better understand adult suicide mortality risk by sex and age groups using data from the National Health Interview Surveys linked to mortality information from the National Death Index (1986-2006). Our results from Cox proportional hazard models confirm that the social patterns in suicide mortality differ by sex: strong associations of education, marriage and bed ...


An Empirical Test Of Alternative Theories Of Educational Inequality, Arthur Sakamoto, Changhwan Kim, Hyeyoung Woo Jan 2012

An Empirical Test Of Alternative Theories Of Educational Inequality, Arthur Sakamoto, Changhwan Kim, Hyeyoung Woo

Sociology Faculty Publications and Presentations

A classic issue in education centers on the nature of the relationship between schooling and labor market outcomes. Three general theories of this relationship are the human capital view, the market signal view, and the credentialist view. All three approaches predict a positive association between education and wages, but they differ in regard to its underlying causes. We argue that these theories may be fundamentally differentiated in terms of their implications for productivity, and we provide some relevant findings using productivity data for US manufacturing industries from 1976 to 1996. The results most strongly support the market signal view which ...