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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Family Aided Community Treatment As An Intervention For The Treatment Of Early Psychosis: A Proof Of Concept Study, Ryan P. Melton Oct 2012

Family Aided Community Treatment As An Intervention For The Treatment Of Early Psychosis: A Proof Of Concept Study, Ryan P. Melton

Regional Research Institute

Major psychotic disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, having severe impacts on the people who suffer from the conditions, their families and society. There is evidence that if these conditions are identified and treated early, the prognosis is improved. The purpose of this study is to produce findings related to the use of year long trial of family aided community treatment (FACT) with individuals who are experiencing a first episode psychosis as defined by the SIPS. Using a proof of concept design with multiple repeated measure t tests, this study focused on first-episode psychotic disorder participants ...


From Portland To Paris: Clinical Perspectives On Supporting Young People Suffering From Early Psychosis, Craigan Usher, Ryan P. Melton, Sarah Lynch Jul 2012

From Portland To Paris: Clinical Perspectives On Supporting Young People Suffering From Early Psychosis, Craigan Usher, Ryan P. Melton, Sarah Lynch

Regional Research Institute

This workshop examines the Early Detection and Prevention of Psychosis Program (EDIPPP) that focuses on reducing the incidence of major psychotic disorders in a defined population, by early detection and treatment.


Family Psychoeducation In Clinical High Risk And First- Episode Psychosis, William R. Mcfarlane, Sarah Lynch, Ryan P. Melton Apr 2012

Family Psychoeducation In Clinical High Risk And First- Episode Psychosis, William R. Mcfarlane, Sarah Lynch, Ryan P. Melton

Regional Research Institute

Seventy percent of those who will have an episode of psychosis will have done so by age 25. Data from clinical trials of intervention during the clinical high risk period of psychosis have determined that the mean age is in mid-adolescence, 16-18 years of age. For those reasons, early intervention inherently involves adolescents, and by extension their parents and other family members and supports. Regarding the type of intervention, it is relevant that the current empirically-derived standard of treatment for schizophrenia, as concluded by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research survey of the treatment outcome literature, includes family ...


Addressing The Physical Health Challenges Impacting Young Individuals With Major Mental Illness, Ryan P. Melton Jan 2012

Addressing The Physical Health Challenges Impacting Young Individuals With Major Mental Illness, Ryan P. Melton

Regional Research Institute

Research has found that individuals who suffer from major mental illness, such as schizophrenia, are dying on average 15-25 years earlier than those who do not suffer from schizophrenia.1 Many causes for this shortened lifespan are suspected. Those causes include: lack of access to health care, suicide, poverty, substance use and side effects from anti-psychotic medications. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has challenged mental health providers treating major mental illness to address this disturbing trend by promoting their “10x10” campaign. The goal of the campaign is to increase the lifespan of individuals who suffer from ...


A Counselor’S Role In Diagnosing The Proposed Dsm-5 Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome: A Pathway To Early Intervention Or Iatrogenic Consequences?, Vanessa Jung Tirman, Ryan P. Melton Jan 2012

A Counselor’S Role In Diagnosing The Proposed Dsm-5 Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome: A Pathway To Early Intervention Or Iatrogenic Consequences?, Vanessa Jung Tirman, Ryan P. Melton

Regional Research Institute

Psychosis in general, and schizophrenia specifically, are among the most debilitating and difficult to treat disorders in mental health (Correll, Hauser, Auther, & Cornblatt, 2010). Identifying a patient with at-risk symptoms before the first episode of schizophrenia can be invaluable to the patient, clinician, and the community because the patient is treated early in the course of the disease where treatment is highly effective. After years of research it has been confirmed that at-risk symptoms for schizophrenia generally precede the first episode of psychosis, which results in the diagnosis of schizophrenia (Correll et al., 2010). At present however, the assessment and recognition of these symptoms for schizophrenia or APS remain under debate (Carpenter, 2009). Research has shown that utilizing low dose antipsychotic medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, and having a supportive family and social environment are essential resources to recovery and reduction of trauma for a patient experiencing symptoms of APS (Lencz, Smith, Auther, Correll, & Cornblatt, 2003; McGlashan, Walsh, & Woods, 2010; Olsen & Rosenbaum, 2006; Portland Identification and Early Referral Program, 2009; S.Trevino, personal communication, November 18, 2010). At this time research shows that early detection of APS symptoms can achieve secondary and tertiary prevention, such as delaying the onset of psychosis and reducing suicide, but does not prevent schizophrenia from occurring (McGlashan, et al., 2010.) There are various ways in which counselors can receive referrals to assess a patient for APS. The patient can be referred by a ...