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Social and Behavioral Sciences Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

2012

Dartmouth College

Labor Economics

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Information And Employee Evaluation: Evidence From A Randomized Intervention In Public Schools, Jonah E. Rockoff, Douglas O. Staiger, Thomas J. Kane, Eric S. Taylor Dec 2012

Information And Employee Evaluation: Evidence From A Randomized Intervention In Public Schools, Jonah E. Rockoff, Douglas O. Staiger, Thomas J. Kane, Eric S. Taylor

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

We examine how employers learn about worker productivity in a randomized pilot experiment which provided objective estimates of teacher performance to school principals. We test several hypotheses that support a simple Bayesian learning model with imperfect information. First, the correlation between performance estimates and prior beliefs rises with more precise objective estimates and more precise subjective priors. Second, new information exerts greater influence on posterior beliefs when it is more precise and when priors are less precise. Employer learning affects job separation and productivity in schools, increasing turnover for teachers with low performance estimates and producing small test score improvements ...


Globalization And U.S. Wages: Modifying Classic Theory To Explain Recent Facts, Jonathan Haskel, Robert Z. Lawrence, Edward E. Leamer, Matthew J. Slaughter Jan 2012

Globalization And U.S. Wages: Modifying Classic Theory To Explain Recent Facts, Jonathan Haskel, Robert Z. Lawrence, Edward E. Leamer, Matthew J. Slaughter

Open Dartmouth: Faculty Open Access Scholarship

This paper seeks to review how globalization might explain the recent trends in real and relative wages in the United States. We begin with an overview of what is new during the last 10-15 years in globalization, productivity, and patterns of U.S. earnings. To preview our results, we then work through four main findings: First, there is only mixed evidence that trade in goods, intermediates, and services has been raising inequality between more- and less-skilled workers. Second, it is more possible, although far from proven, that globalization has been boosting the real and relative earnings of superstars. The usual ...