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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Welfare Issues With Tail Docking Of Cows In The Dairy Industry, The Humane Society Of The United States Oct 2012

Welfare Issues With Tail Docking Of Cows In The Dairy Industry, The Humane Society Of The United States

IMPACTS ON FARM ANIMALS

Banned in several European countries, as well as three US states, and opposed and criticized by the American Veterinary Medical Association, Canadian Veterinary Medical Association, experts, scientists, and representatives of industry, tail docking of cows in the dairy industry—the partial amputation of up to two-thirds of the tail, typically performed without anesthetic—is still permitted in most of the United States. Scientific studies have shown the practice to cause serious welfare problems for animals, including distress, pain, and increased fly attacks.


The Welfare Of Intensively Confined Animals In Battery Cages, Gestation Crates, And Veal Crates, The Humane Society Of The United States Jul 2012

The Welfare Of Intensively Confined Animals In Battery Cages, Gestation Crates, And Veal Crates, The Humane Society Of The United States

IMPACTS ON FARM ANIMALS

Within U.S. animal agriculture, the majority of egg-laying hens, pregnant sows, and calves raised for veal are reared in battery cages, gestation crates, and veal crates, respectively. The intensive confinement of these production systems severely impairs the animals’ welfare, as they are unable to exercise, fully extend their limbs, or engage in many important natural behaviors. As a result of the severe restriction within these barren confinement systems, animals can experience significant and prolonged physical and psychological assaults. Indeed, extensive scientific evidence shows that intensively confined farm animals are frustrated, distressed, and suffering.


Attitudes Of Canadian Beef Producers Toward Animal Welfare, J. M. Spooner, C. A. Schuppli, D. Fraser May 2012

Attitudes Of Canadian Beef Producers Toward Animal Welfare, J. M. Spooner, C. A. Schuppli, D. Fraser

Farm Animal Welfare

Commercial beef production in western Canada involves raising cows and calves on large tracts of grassland, plus grain-based ‘finishing’ of animals in outdoor feedlots. This study used open-ended, semi-structured interviews to explore views on animal welfare of 23 commercial beef producers in this system. Although wary of the term ‘animal welfare’, participants understood the concept to encompass three well-known elements: (i) basic animal health and body condition; (ii) affective states (comfort, contentment, freedom from hunger or thirst); and (iii) the ability to live a ‘natural’ life. Participants attached importance to protecting animals from natural hardships (extreme weather, predators), yet many ...


An Hsus Report: Food Safety Risks Associated With U.S. Horse Slaughter, The Humane Society Of The United States Apr 2012

An Hsus Report: Food Safety Risks Associated With U.S. Horse Slaughter, The Humane Society Of The United States

ENVIRONMENT AND HUMAN HEALTH

Meat originating from U.S. horses may contain residues from substances banned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Union for use in animals intended for consumption. Phenylbutazone, for example, is commonly administered to U.S. horses and has been associated with life-threatening reactions in humans. Requiring a thorough drug history for each U.S. horse intended for human consumption may help circumvent human health risks.


Using Grizzly Bears To Assess Harvest-Ecosystem Tradeoffs In Salmon Fisheries, Taal Levi, Chris T. Darimont, Misty Macduffee, Marc Mangel, Paul C. Paquet, Christopher C. Wilmers Apr 2012

Using Grizzly Bears To Assess Harvest-Ecosystem Tradeoffs In Salmon Fisheries, Taal Levi, Chris T. Darimont, Misty Macduffee, Marc Mangel, Paul C. Paquet, Christopher C. Wilmers

Aquaculture and Fisheries

Implementation of ecosystem-based fisheries management (EBFM) requires a clear conceptual and quantitative framework for assessing how different harvest options can modify benefits to ecosystem and human beneficiaries. We address this social-ecological need for Pacific salmon fisheries, which are economically valuable but intercept much of the annual pulse of nutrient subsidies that salmon provide to terrestrial and aquatic food webs. We used grizzly bears, vectors of salmon nutrients and animals with densities strongly coupled to salmon abundance, as surrogates for ‘‘salmon ecosystem’’ function. Combining salmon biomass and stock-recruitment data with stable isotope analysis, we assess potential tradeoffs between fishery yields and ...


The Welfare Of Animals In The Foie Gras Industry, The Humane Society Of The United States Mar 2012

The Welfare Of Animals In The Foie Gras Industry, The Humane Society Of The United States

IMPACTS ON FARM ANIMALS

The production of pâté de foie gras involves force-feeding ducks and geese by placing a long tube down the birds’ esophagi and pumping an unnatural quantity of food directly into their stomachs. Force-feeding induces hepatic lipidosis and causes the birds’ livers to become diseased and enlarged. Substantial scientific evidence suggests that force-feeding can cause pain and injury from feeding tube insertion, fear and stress during capture and handling, gait abnormality due to distended livers, pathologies in liver function, and increased mortality. Force-feeding birds to produce foie gras is detrimental to their welfare.


The Hsus Investigates: Chicagoland Pet Stores, The Humane Society Of The United States Jan 2012

The Hsus Investigates: Chicagoland Pet Stores, The Humane Society Of The United States

PUPPY MILL INFORMATION

Over three days (October 29-31, 2012), an HSUS investigator and a local Chicago resident visited 12 Chicagoland pet stores to find out where the cute little puppies in the windows were bred. Again and again, salespeople denied that their puppies came from puppy mills, and most did not comply with a law passed in 2010 by the State requiring pet shops to “post in a conspicuous place in writing on or near the cage of any dog or cat available for sale the information required by subsection (a) of this section.” The information required includes the price, age, health and ...


The American Kennel Club: No Longer “The Dog's Champion?”, The Humane Society Of The United States Jan 2012

The American Kennel Club: No Longer “The Dog's Champion?”, The Humane Society Of The United States

PUPPY MILL INFORMATION

The AKC has historically billed itself as “The Dog’s Champion,” the gold standard registry for purebred puppies. The AKC's mission includes advocating for advances in “canine health and well- being” and working “to promote responsible dog ownership.”*1 Yet with all its emphasis on proper dog and puppy care, in recent years the AKC has opposed the majority of initiatives designed to prevent cruelty at large-scale breeding facilities known as puppy mills. In contrast to its vague public statements condemning substandard kennels, over the past 5 years the AKC has opposed more than 80 different bills and ordinances ...


Puppy Buyer Complaints: A Five-Year Summary, 2007‐2011, The Humane Society Of The United States Jan 2012

Puppy Buyer Complaints: A Five-Year Summary, 2007‐2011, The Humane Society Of The United States

PUPPY MILL REPORTS

The Humane Society of the United States receives complaints about sick puppies on a daily basis. Over a five-year period (2007-2011), our puppy mills campaign received 2,479 puppy buyer complaints. The complaint came to The HSUS via our website complaint form (www.humanesociety.org/puppycomplaint), by email, and through our puppy mills tip line. Buyers complained about sick puppies sold by a variety of sources, including pet stores, breeders (both in person and online), or middleman dealers (sometimes known as brokers). Unsatisfied buyers contact The HSUS for many reasons; some are seeking information about how to pursue their consumer ...


The Problem Of Unlicensed Puppy Mills, The Humane Society Of The United States Jan 2012

The Problem Of Unlicensed Puppy Mills, The Humane Society Of The United States

PUPPY MILL REPORTS

Currently the United States Department of Agriculture does not license or inspect large-scale puppy producers who sell puppies over the Internet or directly to the public. Many of these unlicensed facilities sell puppies sight-unseen to unsuspecting buyers who assume they are purchasing from a small family breeder. Hundreds of these “direct” sellers have taken advantage of the pre-Internet language of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) regulations (otherwise known as the “retail pet stores loophole”) to operate without any federal oversight or inspections. As a result, an increasing number of large-scale unlicensed breeders are not monitored for their animals’ overall health ...


Veterinary Problems In Puppy Mill Dogs, The Humane Society Of The United States Jan 2012

Veterinary Problems In Puppy Mill Dogs, The Humane Society Of The United States

PUPPY MILL REPORTS

Dogs in puppy mills often suffer from an array of painful and potentially life-shortening veterinary problems due to overcrowded, unsanitary conditions and the lack of proper oversight or veterinary care. Conditions common to puppy mills, such as the use of stacked, wire cages to house more animals than a given space should reasonably hold, as well as constant exposure to the feces and urine of other dogs, make it difficult for dogs to avoid exposure to common parasites and infectious diseases. In addition, a lack of regular, preventive veterinary care, clean food and water, basic cleaning and grooming, and careful ...


The Welfare Of Calves In The Beef Industry, The Humane Society Of The United States Jan 2012

The Welfare Of Calves In The Beef Industry, The Humane Society Of The United States

IMPACTS ON FARM ANIMALS

Calves raised for beef often begin life unconfined, on rangeland where they are free to express their natural behavior. However, the welfare of calves can be compromised by certain specific management practices, typical on many ranching operations. These include castration of male calves, dehorning, and branding, all of which are usually performed without anesthesia or analgesia, pain relief of any kind. Welfare is also a concern during weaning, handling, auction, and transport, common stressful events that occur before calves are moved to feedlots. Techniques to minimize pain and distress should be used or further developed in order to address the ...