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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Social Work And Conditional Cash Transfers In Latin America., Cindy Calvo Sep 2011

Social Work And Conditional Cash Transfers In Latin America., Cindy Calvo

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Conditional cash transfer (CCT) programs are a recent anti-poverty strategy in Latin America. CCT programs provide cash benefits to finance basic needs and foster investment in human capital to extremely poor households. These benefits are conditioned on certain behaviors, usually related to investments in nutrition, health, and education. In the literature, there is a recognizable lack of analyses from social science disciplines related to CCT program implications. This paper contributes in this arena by analyzing the particular role of social work in CCT anti-poverty programs. The educational element of these programs and its theoretical foundation based on the human capital ...


Dropped From The Rolls: Mexican Immigrants, Race, And Rights In The Era Of Welfare Reform, Alejandra Marchevsky, Jeanne Theoharis Sep 2008

Dropped From The Rolls: Mexican Immigrants, Race, And Rights In The Era Of Welfare Reform, Alejandra Marchevsky, Jeanne Theoharis

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Welfare reform transferred considerable discretion over eligibility standards and benefits to individual caseworkers, contributing to a highly diffuse, yet system-wide, practice of discrimination against nonwhite and foreign-born families within the new TANF program. Based on a two-year ethnographic study of welfare reform's impact on Mexican immigrants in Los Angeles County, this article documents a pattern of heightened anti-immigrant sentiment and disentitlement within L.A. County's welfare system following the passage of PRWORA. The vast majority of eligible immigrant families in our study lost some or all of their cash and food stamp benefits, and were systematically denied access ...


From Financial Literacy To Financial Capability Among Youth, Elizabeth Johnson, Margaret S. Sherraden Sep 2007

From Financial Literacy To Financial Capability Among Youth, Elizabeth Johnson, Margaret S. Sherraden

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Youth in the United States are facing an increasingly complex and perilous financial world. Economically disadvantaged youth, in particular, lack financial knowledge and access to mainstream financial institutions. Despite growing interest in youth financial literacy, we have not seen comparable efforts to improve access to financial policies and services, especially among disadvantaged youth. Instead of aiming for financial literacy, an approach widely promoted in the United States, we suggest aiming for financial capability, a concept grounded in the writing of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. Building on research in the United Kingdom, the paper proposes that financial capability results when ...


Honoring The Elders: Interviews With Two Lakota Men, Deborah E. Bowen Mar 2005

Honoring The Elders: Interviews With Two Lakota Men, Deborah E. Bowen

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The beliefs that honoring the elders, commitment to family, and the connectedness to all creation are paramount are intrinsic to Lakota culture. Two Lakota elders, Albert White Hat, Sr. and Sylvan White Hat, Sr. are interviewed for this article. They express their concerns with major social justice issues, and offer hope for future generations of Lakota children. A strengths-based perspective of social work practice is compared to traditional Lakota customs and practices.


The Culture Of Race, Class, And Poverty: The Emergence Of A Cultural Discourse In Early Cold War Social Work (1946-1963), Laura Curran Sep 2003

The Culture Of Race, Class, And Poverty: The Emergence Of A Cultural Discourse In Early Cold War Social Work (1946-1963), Laura Curran

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Through a primary source historical analysis, this article discusses the emergence of a cultural discourse in the early cold war (1946-1963) social work literature. It traces the evolution of social work's cultural narrative in relation to social scientific perspectives, changing race relations, and increasing welfare caseloads. Social work scholars originally employed their cultural discourse to account for racial and ethnic difference and eventually came to examine class and poverty from this viewpoint as well. This cultural framework wrestled with internal contradictions. It simultaneously celebrated and problematized cultural difference and foreshadowed both latter twentieth century multiculturalism as well as neo-conservative ...


O'Odham Himdag As A Source Of Strength And Wellness Among The Tohono O'Odham Of Southern Arizona And Northern Sonora, Mexico, Teri Knutson Woods, Karen Blaine, Lauri Francisco Mar 2002

O'Odham Himdag As A Source Of Strength And Wellness Among The Tohono O'Odham Of Southern Arizona And Northern Sonora, Mexico, Teri Knutson Woods, Karen Blaine, Lauri Francisco

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The Tohono O'odham are fostering strength and wellness in their community by translating increased economic self-sufficiency and resources derived from gaming into social, health, and educational services which maintain their tribal traditions, thereby providing an effective path toward the maintenance of cultural identity, or O'odham Himdag. Cultural identity serves as a source of client strength and as a protective factor contributing to client wellness. O'odham Himdag describes a way of life, encompassing Tohono O'odham culture. This article is a theoretical exploration of O'odham Himdag as a path toward cultural identity among the Tohono O'odham ...


Native Wellness For The New Millennium: The Impact Of Gaming, Maria Napoli Mar 2002

Native Wellness For The New Millennium: The Impact Of Gaming, Maria Napoli

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The challenges confronting Native people have been studied over the years. Their plight in dealing with alcoholism, colonization, poverty and health and mental health problems still exists outnumbering all other minority groups in the United States. For decades, Native people have relied upon the federal government to provide services, which were often not sensitive to Native values. During the last decade, gaming has given Native people have an avenue to enter higher education, develop tribal enterprises, tribal courts and health and mental health programs that meet the needs of their communities. Most importantly, Native people have reclaimed their independence. Since ...


The Hoop Of Learning: A Holistic, Multisystemic Model For Facilitating Educational Resilience Among Indigenous Students, Margaret A. Waller, Scott K. Okamoto, Ted Hibbeler, Patricia Hibbeler, Patricia Mcintyre, Roland Mcallen-Walker, Audrey A. Hankerson Mar 2002

The Hoop Of Learning: A Holistic, Multisystemic Model For Facilitating Educational Resilience Among Indigenous Students, Margaret A. Waller, Scott K. Okamoto, Ted Hibbeler, Patricia Hibbeler, Patricia Mcintyre, Roland Mcallen-Walker, Audrey A. Hankerson

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Indigenous communities in the United States have a wealth of cultural and social resources that can facilitate educational resilience among Native students. This article reviews the historical context, contemporary trends, and current challenges related to education of Indigenous students. The authors present an innovative middle school-to-high school-to-college bridge program as one example of many positive educational initiatives currently developing across the country.


Envisioning A Healthy Future: A Re-Becoming Of Native American Men, Paul Rock Krech Mar 2002

Envisioning A Healthy Future: A Re-Becoming Of Native American Men, Paul Rock Krech

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Native American men have historically been important to their communities, each having a specific function in the perpetuation of cultural norms and practices. Oral tradition and communal experiential activity were pathways of maintaining a connection with others and in regenerating culture. In contrast, the modern dominant culture values and emphasizes individuation as an indicator of psychosocial growth. This influence seems to have hindered Indigenous people/men in maintaining a sense of connection with the community. Survival for Indigenous men during the establishment of encroaching nations has often occurred through relinquishment of a part of 'self' psychically. Aboriginal men report experiencing ...


E.L.D.E.R.S. Gathering For Native American Youth: Continuing Native American Traditions And Curbing Substance Abuse In Native American Youth, Warren Skye Mar 2002

E.L.D.E.R.S. Gathering For Native American Youth: Continuing Native American Traditions And Curbing Substance Abuse In Native American Youth, Warren Skye

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

E.L.D.E.R.S. Gathering for Native American youth: continuing Native American traditions and curbing substance abuse in Native American youth describes the efforts of Native American Elders, traditionalists, and non-native volunteers interested in preserving the culture and traditions of the Haudenosaunee (People of the Longhouse), also known as the Iroquois. This event is held every summer at the Ganondagan Historical site located near Victor, in upstate New York. The purpose of this week long gathering is to bring together Native American youth who are interested in learning more about their traditional ways with Native American Elders who ...


Using Reasons For Living To Connect To American Indian Healing Traditions, Thomas L. Crofoot Graham Mar 2002

Using Reasons For Living To Connect To American Indian Healing Traditions, Thomas L. Crofoot Graham

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Responding to high rates of suicide for American Indian youth, helping professionals often struggle to connect healing traditions from American Indian cultures to tools from European psychology. The differences between American Indian healing and European therapy can be vast. Finding connections or building bridges between these two perspectives may be more difficult than it appears (Duran & Duran, 1995). One method to bring together these worldviews is to use the Reasons for Living Questionnaire (RFL, Linehan, Goldstein, Nielsen, & Chiles, 1983); the Reasons for Living Inventory for Adolescents (RFL-A, Osman, Downs, Kopper, Barios, Besett, Linehan, Baker, & Osman, 1998), or other psychological assessments developed using the RFL as a foundation.

Reasons for Living (RFL) assessments have emerged as powerful strength based tools for assessing suicide risk ...


Review Of Addictions And Native Americans. Lawrence Armand French. Reviewed By Michael Gorman, San Jose State University., Michael Gorman Mar 2001

Review Of Addictions And Native Americans. Lawrence Armand French. Reviewed By Michael Gorman, San Jose State University., Michael Gorman

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Book review for Lawrence Armand French, Addictions and Native Americans. Westport, CT: Praeger Publications, 2000. $59.95 hardcover.


Caregiving For And By Hispanic Elders: Perceptions Of Four Generations Of Women, Juanita L. Garcia, Jordan I. Kosberg, Wiley P. Mangum, Neil Henderson, Colleen Cuervo Henderson Mar 1999

Caregiving For And By Hispanic Elders: Perceptions Of Four Generations Of Women, Juanita L. Garcia, Jordan I. Kosberg, Wiley P. Mangum, Neil Henderson, Colleen Cuervo Henderson

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

So as to learn about the experiences of acculturation among older Hispanic women, four generations were interviewed about their ethnic identity, perceptions of gender equity in the home, life satisfaction, and beliefs regarding family caregiving responsibilities. Findings reveal general differences between hopes for, and experiences with, gender equity and in their self-identification as a member of a minority group and their perceptions of others toward them. Differences were also found among the four age groups of Hispanic women.


The Definition Of Fatherhood: In The Words Of Never-Married African American Custodial Mothers And The Noncustodial Fathers Of Their Children, Jennifer F. Hamer Dec 1998

The Definition Of Fatherhood: In The Words Of Never-Married African American Custodial Mothers And The Noncustodial Fathers Of Their Children, Jennifer F. Hamer

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This qualitative study explores the meaning of fatherhood from the perspective of never-married parents. Specifically, the study describes: how African American custodial mothers perceive the roles and responsibilities of their children's fathers; the extent to which these mothers' perceptions and definitions of noncustodial fatherhood are consistent with those of noncustodial fathers and the dominant cultural "ideal"; and what mothers do to enhance men's paternal participation. A convenience sample of 25 never-married,f ormer couples was drawn from the predominantlyA frican American population of a mid-sized Midwestern city. Data was collected via in-depth interviews with each individual respondent. The ...


Indochinese Mental Health In North America: Measures, Status, And Treatments, Thanh V. Tran, Donna L. Ferullo Jun 1997

Indochinese Mental Health In North America: Measures, Status, And Treatments, Thanh V. Tran, Donna L. Ferullo

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The massive influx of Indochinese refugees and immigrants to North America since the end of the Indochina war, especially to the United States of America, has resulted in numerous multi-disciplinary efforts to document and study their mental well-being. As a group, Indochinese Americans arrived from war-torn countries where many had experienced various forms of trauma, poverty, and oppression. Their pre-migration experiences, and experiences in adjusting and adapting to the new life in the host society have influenced their mental health status and overall quality of life in various ways. This paper analyzes and synthesizes a wealth of multi-disciplinary research on ...


Family Functioning And Psychological Well-Being In Vietnamese Adolescents, Quang Duong Tran, Cheryl A. Richey Mar 1997

Family Functioning And Psychological Well-Being In Vietnamese Adolescents, Quang Duong Tran, Cheryl A. Richey

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This paper presents an exploratory study that examines the influences of family functioning on the psychological well-being in a sample of Vietnamese adolescents. Thirty Vietnamese families from the King County area in the state of Washington participated in this study. Thirty adolescents between 13 and 19 years of age and 53 parents (27fathers and 26 mothers) responded to self-reported questionnaires. Data analysis was conducted to provide a descriptive "picture" of family and individual characteristics associated with Vietnamese adolescents' psychological well-being. Gender differences were apparent with Vietnamese female adolescents reporting higher mean scores on depressive symptoms and lower mean scores on ...


Domestic Violence In The Korean Immigrant Family, Siyon Rhee Mar 1997

Domestic Violence In The Korean Immigrant Family, Siyon Rhee

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This article was supported in part by the University Research Grant from California State University, Los Angeles.

This study examines the prevalence of wife abuse among Korean immigrant families in the United States and factors contributing to domestic violence in this population. One of the most serious problems facing the Korean community is spouse abuse. Immigrant Korean families are reported to experience the highest rate of domestic violence among diverse Asian American groups in Los Angeles. Research findings indicate that wife abuse is much more prevalent among the immigrant Korean population in comparison to other ethnic groups. Correlates and factors ...


Notes Toward A Theory Of Secondary Integration: Aporias Of A Lost Paradigm, Brij Mohan Mar 1997

Notes Toward A Theory Of Secondary Integration: Aporias Of A Lost Paradigm, Brij Mohan

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Asian Americans' contributions and experiences add a unique dimension to the nation's ethnic mosaic. While they share many a commonality with other ethnic groups, excursus on the duality of their triumph and failure unfold a host of emerging issues in the study of post-industrial alienation. The premise of this article posits the Asian American experience in the context of secondary integration: a possible reality that, despite delimited access, allows space and humanity in the promised land.


Asian American Experiences: A View From The Other Side, Pill Jay Cho Mar 1997

Asian American Experiences: A View From The Other Side, Pill Jay Cho

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

President Truman is said to have complained about his assistants for giving him advice "on the other hand" as well as the first one. He joked about his wish to find an advisor who has only one arm. As one of the two guest editors for the present special issue on Asian American Experience, I have been surprised by the fact that all manuscripts submitted discuss what I call "negative" side of the Asian American experiences.


Asian-American Elderly: A Review Of The Quality Of Life And Social Service Needs, Mizanur R. Miah, Dean R. Kahler Mar 1997

Asian-American Elderly: A Review Of The Quality Of Life And Social Service Needs, Mizanur R. Miah, Dean R. Kahler

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This paper briefly reviews the historical, cultural, and socio-economic factors that affect and define the lives of Asian-American elderly. A close examination of the present quality of life of Asian-American Elderly is made to determine if there are differences between that population and other populations. This paper provides information about existing social services and a summary of culturally relevant social work intervention. In conclusion, the paper underscores the urgent need for additional data collection regarding the Asian-American elderly that will help guide appropriate policy decisions and social services for this neglected group.


Asian-American Women: An Understudied Minority, Lina Y. S. Fong Mar 1997

Asian-American Women: An Understudied Minority, Lina Y. S. Fong

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This paper describes Asian-American women with their inter-ethnic, intergenerational connections. Diversities in race, ethnicity, and socio-economic status influence their lives in family, participation in education, the labor force, and community life. Issues and implications about the myth of Asian- American as model minority, the influence of feminism, and social work service for Asian-American women are also discussed.


Poverty Among Asian Americans: Theories And Approaches, Surjit Singh Dhooper Mar 1997

Poverty Among Asian Americans: Theories And Approaches, Surjit Singh Dhooper

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Asian Americans are not immune to poverty and its consequences. This paper has reviewed several poverty-related concepts and theories and examined their relevance for understanding and dealing with poverty among Asian Americans. Social work interventions are proposed at both macro and micro levels together with the professional skills necessary for those interventions.


Native American Agencies For Native American Children: Fulfilling The Promise Of The Indian Child Welfare Act, Anthony Mcmahon, Ernest N. Gullerud Mar 1995

Native American Agencies For Native American Children: Fulfilling The Promise Of The Indian Child Welfare Act, Anthony Mcmahon, Ernest N. Gullerud

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The Indian Child Welfare Act seeks to protect Indian children from family and cultural disruption. The Act mandates minimum standards for the removal of Indian children and for their placement in foster care. However, a recent national survey suggests that requirements for Indian foster homes are not being met in public agency substitute care programs. At the same time, Native American child welfare agencies have developed a range of services for Native American children. The authors show that the intent of the Act will be better served if the case management of Native American children in public agency care is ...


The History Of Social Work Education For Black People 1900-1930, Robenia Baker Gary, Lawrence E. Gary Mar 1994

The History Of Social Work Education For Black People 1900-1930, Robenia Baker Gary, Lawrence E. Gary

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The nature and extent of the contributions of Black people to social work education during the early twentieth century is the focus of this paper. The scope of this investigation includes: the identification of prominent Black social work educators; analysis of the curricula and the Atlanta School of Social Work and the Bishop Turtle School; and a description of the four basic approaches to social work training for Black people during this development phase of the social work profession.


Social Work Services And Social Work Training For African Americans In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1900-1930, Tawana Ford Sabbath Mar 1994

Social Work Services And Social Work Training For African Americans In Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1900-1930, Tawana Ford Sabbath

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The longstanding presence of African Americans in Philadelphia explains the establishment of social welfare institutions and agencies by more affluent African Americans in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The Armstrong Association of Philadelphia and Women's Christian Alliance are two of the more prominent and enduring efforts initiated by African Americans to serve their own. Both also provided a vehicle for training for African Americans who desired to join the new profession of social work.


A Black Community Development Model: The Universal Negro Improvement Association And African Communities League 1917-1940, Amnifu R. Harvey Mar 1994

A Black Community Development Model: The Universal Negro Improvement Association And African Communities League 1917-1940, Amnifu R. Harvey

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

A discussion of The Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA & ACL) founded by Marcus Garvey in 1915 is presented. The organization provided social services for people of African ancestry in both the U.S. and other countries as well. An analysis of this organization occurs, citing the functions of subgroups like the Universal African Legions and the Universal African Motor Corps. This organization serves as a historic model for contemporary community development.


Introduction - The Legacy Of African-American Leadership In Social Welfare, Iris Carlton-Laney Mar 1994

Introduction - The Legacy Of African-American Leadership In Social Welfare, Iris Carlton-Laney

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

The legacy of African-American leadership in social welfare history is only recently finding space in social work literature. The small number of professional journals in social work that publish historical articles, along with institutionalized resistance to the acknowledgement of African-Americans contributions to the development of the profession, have contributed to this dearth of scholarship. The results have been that many professionals are disinclined to perceive of African-Americans as resourceful, skilled and powerful. Instead, the theme of pathology permeates social work literature, teaching, and ultimately social work practice. The social work profession emphasizes the importance of diversity, yet fails to acknowledge ...


"Almost A Partnership": African-Americans, Segregation, And The Young Men's Christian Association, Susan Kerr Chandler Mar 1994

"Almost A Partnership": African-Americans, Segregation, And The Young Men's Christian Association, Susan Kerr Chandler

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

On January 1, 1913, the Colored Men's Department of the Young Men's Christian Association gathered in Washington, D.C., at the Twelfth Street "Y". The six African American International Secretaries made a practice of coming together on this holiday, finding in the New Year a quiet time to talk among themselves. Dr. Jesse E. Moorland, the Department's senior secretary, was scheduled to give "Remarks," as usual, and the secretaries looked forward to them-particularly this year, which, they knew, held great opportunity for their work. The Twelfth Street Y.M.C.A.-the "Colored Branch"-itself bore witness ...


Social Workers And The Development Of The Naacp, Linda S. Moore Mar 1994

Social Workers And The Development Of The Naacp, Linda S. Moore

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

This article addresses the relationship between African-American leaders and settlement house workers in the development of the NAACP. Using social movement theory and Hasenfeld and Tropman's conceptual framework for interorganizational relations, it analyzes the linkages developed between voluntary associations and how they benefitted all involved. This linkage provides lessons for today's struggle for social justice.


"Gentle Student Bend Thine Ear To My Speech" An Essay About Sojourner Truth, Abolitionist And Feminist, Laura B. Somerville Mar 1994

"Gentle Student Bend Thine Ear To My Speech" An Essay About Sojourner Truth, Abolitionist And Feminist, Laura B. Somerville

The Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare

Sojourner Truth provides a powerful model of advocacy for the social work profession. This paper offers an analysis of this important historical figure that centers around the implications of being a doubly oppressed minority. An analysis of the nineteenth century chattel slavery system sets the stage for understanding the social environment. A brief biography of her life and evolution from enslaved chattel to feminist activist will highlight her social, spiritual, and personal development. Her philosophy, which is compatible with the modern feminist movement, is outlined by an analysis of her speeches.