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Great Plains Quarterly

1998

Articles 31 - 60 of 159

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Review Of Why I Can't Read Wallace Stegner And Other Essays: A Tribal Voice, Sharon Butala Apr 1998

Review Of Why I Can't Read Wallace Stegner And Other Essays: A Tribal Voice, Sharon Butala

Great Plains Quarterly

Elizabeth Cook-Lynn is a Dakota who, born and raised to adulthood on the Crow Creek Indian Reservation near Fort Thompson, South Dakota, became a successful academic and a writer. On her departure from Eastern Washington University where she taught for nineteen years, she was described by her colleagues as "one of Indian Studies' secondary founders and also, in many ways, its conscience."

She dedicates her book to "the indigenous writer in the modern world" and declares it to be "designed to raise and discuss issues that are some of the most central and crucial questions in the field of American ...


Review Of Till Freedom Cried Out: Memories Of Texas Slave Life Edited By T. Lindsay Baker And Julie P. Baker, Barry A. Crouch Apr 1998

Review Of Till Freedom Cried Out: Memories Of Texas Slave Life Edited By T. Lindsay Baker And Julie P. Baker, Barry A. Crouch

Great Plains Quarterly

As the Civil War's last shot was fired, Texas held one-tenth of the slave population of all the Confederate States: four hundred thousand- an increase of almost a quarter of a million souls from the beginning of hostilities. That this forced migration did not lead to continuous and prolonged upheaval is rather remarkable. Also remarkable is the number of narratives collected from former slaves residing in Texas in the 1930s regardless of where they had been born. These recollections comprise six of the forty-one volumes in the collection of slave narratives edited by George P. Rawick. Now, in a ...


Review Of Field Of Vision By Lisa Knopp, Donald B. Cunningham Apr 1998

Review Of Field Of Vision By Lisa Knopp, Donald B. Cunningham

Great Plains Quarterly

In Field of Vision, Lisa Knopp, like many nature essayists, explores and explicates both interior and exterior landscapes; unlike many less skillful writers, she negotiates the difficult terrain between the two, with its uncertain borders, tangled undergrowth, and hidden precipices, with delicate balance and a sure step. The sixteen essays in the collection, written between 1989 and 1995, range over a wide variety of subjects-a possum's tail, a heron's eye, the plover's name, a cricket's chirp, the crumpled wings of the mayfly nymph-but share a common theme: the naturalist's search for the boundary-or for some ...


Review Of Charles M. Russell: The Life And Legend Of America's Cowboy Artist By John Taliaferro, Elizabeth Dear Apr 1998

Review Of Charles M. Russell: The Life And Legend Of America's Cowboy Artist By John Taliaferro, Elizabeth Dear

Great Plains Quarterly

For all the books written on Russell, an accurate, up-to-date biography has been lacking. Perhaps a definitive biography can never be fashioned since Russell left so little writing about himself. He and his wife Nancy did, however, leave many clues in letters to friends, in his fascinating tales, and in numerous other documents which, when pieced together, provide a credible portrayal of this complicated individual.

The first biography, published in 1948, twenty-two years after his death and eight after his wife's, was based on a manuscript commissioned by Nancy Russell which she deemed unsuitable for publication. Earlier autobiographies by ...


Review Of The Dust Rose Like Smoke: The Subjugation Of The Zulu And The Sioux By James O. Gump, Learthen Dorsey Apr 1998

Review Of The Dust Rose Like Smoke: The Subjugation Of The Zulu And The Sioux By James O. Gump, Learthen Dorsey

Great Plains Quarterly

James Gump's comparative study of the transformation of the Zulu and Sioux nations as a result of their interaction with whites on "closing frontiers" in the eastern region of South Africa and on the western Plains of North America respectively is an impressive undertaking. His foci are two battles-the Zulu assault at Rorke's Drift in the Anglo-Zulu War of 1879 and the United States government's massacre of the Sioux at Wounded Knee in 1892. According to the author, these two events have become powerful metaphors, "evoking images of Thermopylae in the first instance and systematic genocide in ...


Review Of Hawk Flies Above: Journey To The Heart Of The Sandhills By Lisa Dale Norton, Brenda Doxtator Apr 1998

Review Of Hawk Flies Above: Journey To The Heart Of The Sandhills By Lisa Dale Norton, Brenda Doxtator

Great Plains Quarterly

"I realize that I am being seduced by memories," Lisa Dale Norton informs us, "that the task at hand has slipped behind the mirage of the past .... This place is lined with my stories. It has the power of home, and any tale I can tell is woven with knowledge I carry from a childhood spent exploring sandy prairie."

There are moments of loss in our lives when an unexpected song on the radio replays haunting fragments of our past. There are moments of joy when the scent of melting snow in spring rises like black earth freshly plowed, conjuring ...


Review Of The Fort That Became A City: An Illustrated Reconstruction Of Fort Worth, Texas, 1849- 1853 By Richard F. Selcer, Robert Duncan Apr 1998

Review Of The Fort That Became A City: An Illustrated Reconstruction Of Fort Worth, Texas, 1849- 1853 By Richard F. Selcer, Robert Duncan

Great Plains Quarterly

Fort Worth, the northern most outpost west of Dallas and part of a chain of forts establishing a general line from the Rio Grande north constructed during the 1850s, is the subject of this book. The forts included in the line Graham, Gates, Croghan, Martin Scott, Inge, and Merrill-covered some three hundred miles from north to south and were built as a defensive system to control the interior of Texas and promote settlement. Fort Worth's origins were at best "humble." It began as an "outpost" for Fort Graham and was named after the estimable General William Jenkins Worth. Its ...


Review Of High Plains Farm Photographs And Text By Paula Chamlee, Bill Ganzel Apr 1998

Review Of High Plains Farm Photographs And Text By Paula Chamlee, Bill Ganzel

Great Plains Quarterly

The Great Plains is a unique, difficult landscape, and those who live here have to learn to adapt to it. Paula Chamlee grew up on a farm on the High Plains of the Texas Panhandle near Adrian. She left "less than a month after high school graduation" and became a fine art photographer. Three decades later, she returned to photograph the farm "while my parents are still active." What she has produced is a beautiful book that quietly tells the story of lives lived on the edge of possibility. Yet, for me, the story is incomplete.

If you have traveled ...


Review Of Uncommon Common Women: Ordinary Lives Of The West By Anne M. Butler And Ona Siporin, Gaynell Gavin Apr 1998

Review Of Uncommon Common Women: Ordinary Lives Of The West By Anne M. Butler And Ona Siporin, Gaynell Gavin

Great Plains Quarterly

Written for a general audience, Uncommon Common Women examines "ordinary" female experience in the American West. Although the women who appear in this book are ordinary in the sense of having gained neither fame nor notoriety, most of them expressed remarkable courage and fortitude in the face of hardship. Uncommon Common Women also emphasizes diversity in western experience.

The authors have used an interesting, but somewhat problematic, blend of history, fiction, and photographs. The photographs, for instance, enhance the text, but lack of captions or numbers makes it arduous for readers to correlate photographs with the numbered photo credits appearing ...


Review Of Farm Boys: Lives Of Gay Men From The Rural Midwest Collected And Edited By Will Fellows, John Gilgun Apr 1998

Review Of Farm Boys: Lives Of Gay Men From The Rural Midwest Collected And Edited By Will Fellows, John Gilgun

Great Plains Quarterly

Dear Will Fellows:

Thank you for collecting and editing Farm Boys. I have already found a use for it. Today, in one of my classes, a student, Ed Grimes, read a poem he had written. I have asked Ed if I can use some of it here:

Jeremiah, twenty-two years old, great looking, great personality, yet he is so damn alone, trying to bust out of the prison which is his closet of sexuality.

He sees fear, he senses despair, he sees facing family, friends and life of such blackness that he cannot comprehend all of the changes it will ...


Review Of The Fatal Confrontation: Historical Studies Of American Indians, Environment, And Historians By Wilbur Jacobs, Patrick Goines Apr 1998

Review Of The Fatal Confrontation: Historical Studies Of American Indians, Environment, And Historians By Wilbur Jacobs, Patrick Goines

Great Plains Quarterly

Throughout his long, distinguished career Wilbur Jacobs has been a fervent and consistent advocate for a more inclusive approach to the study of American history. Using the implements of the ethnographer, demographer, and environmentalist, he has not simply painted our historical landscape with a broader brush; more importantly, he has added clarity and texture to the canvas.

The ten essays reprinted here show the breadth and depth of Jacobs's scholarship and remind us of his profound influence on the succeeding generation of historians. Spanning almost forty years, they not only trace Jacobs's intellectual development, but also show our ...


Review Of Mexicans In The Midwest, 1900-1932 By Juan R. Garcia, Ralph Grajeda Apr 1998

Review Of Mexicans In The Midwest, 1900-1932 By Juan R. Garcia, Ralph Grajeda

Great Plains Quarterly

This is an important book on a significant and neglected topic: the immigration of Mexicans into the Midwest during the early decades of this century.

In contrast to the Southwestern US, the Midwest-with its distinctive Plains landscape and northern weather-would seem inhospitable to a predominantly working-class, Catholic, Spanish-speaking people accustomed to the desert regions and temperate weather of the central valley of Mexico. Mexican immigrants came, though-single men first and families later-"pushed" out from a Mexico in economic or civil strife and "pulled" in by the ready availability of US jobs. Using published materials, government documents, and archival sources ...


Review Of White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade And Prohibition In Indian Country, 1802-1892 By William E. Unrau, Maril Hazlett Apr 1998

Review Of White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade And Prohibition In Indian Country, 1802-1892 By William E. Unrau, Maril Hazlett

Great Plains Quarterly

This book examines how the federal government and private capital, through interlocking agendas, used the alcohol trade in nineteenth-century Indian country to achieve the removal and dispossession of Native peoples from their remaining lands. William E. Unrau argues that federal Indian land cession policies influenced the increase in the region's alcohol trade, thereby ensuring the failure of Indian prohibition. His analysis, challenging the racist view that Indians are by nature disposed to alcohol, claims instead that whites in Indian country "set the standard" for Indian drinking.

Unrau proves that poorly drafted prohibition legislation, conflicting court decisions, and non-enforcement of ...


Review Of The Black Hills Journals Of Colonel Richard Irving Dodge Edited By Wayne R. Kime, Paul L. Hedren Apr 1998

Review Of The Black Hills Journals Of Colonel Richard Irving Dodge Edited By Wayne R. Kime, Paul L. Hedren

Great Plains Quarterly

Formal exploration of the Black Hills was long thwarted by their remoteness in northern Indian country and then by their inclusion in the Great Sioux Reservation created by the 1868 Fort Laramie Treaty. Changing national circumstances by 1874, however, led to Custer's well-publicized Black Hills survey where gold was discovered, as he reported, among the roots of the grass. Though several practical miners traveled with Custer, his expedition's pronouncements were not scientifically grounded, and doubt shrouded his discovery.

Across the nation the prospect of a new El Dorado grew irresistible, and the federal government soon authorized a formal ...


Review Of Bust To Boom: Documentary Photographs Of Kansas, 1936-1949 Edited By Constance B. Schulz, Drake Hokanson Apr 1998

Review Of Bust To Boom: Documentary Photographs Of Kansas, 1936-1949 Edited By Constance B. Schulz, Drake Hokanson

Great Plains Quarterly

Despite its quiet and broad landscape, Kansas has endured a history that runs from antebellum violence, through buffalo slaughter and dust bowl despair, to wartime boom. Perhaps no time in Kansas history has seen more flux than the depression 1930s and the wartime 1940s; and doubtless no time has been better documented by able photographers. Thanks to Kansas-born Roy Stryker and the three documentary photography projects he headed during the period (for the Farm Security Administration, the Office of War Information, and Standard Oil of New Jersey), Kansans and the world have a sharper idea of what life was like ...


Review Of Killing The White Man's Indian: Reinventing Native Americans At The End Of The Twentieth Century By Fergus M. Bordewich, Tom Holm Apr 1998

Review Of Killing The White Man's Indian: Reinventing Native Americans At The End Of The Twentieth Century By Fergus M. Bordewich, Tom Holm

Great Plains Quarterly

Fergus M. Bordewich's foray into Native American politics and identity is disturbing on a number of different levels. It is, on the one hand, a remarkably accurate look at Native American political dilemmas, frustrations, and achievements. On the other, it is a flawed survey of what it means to be Native American in the United States. It lacks a clear critical framework and races willy-nilly from one group to another, judging achievements on the basis of economic success or how the tribes fit into the hierarchical apparatus that runs the nation.

Bordewich is at his finest when dealing with ...


Review Of The Real West Commentary By Patricia Nelson Limerick, Robert Hower Apr 1998

Review Of The Real West Commentary By Patricia Nelson Limerick, Robert Hower

Great Plains Quarterly

In an exhibition and publishing collaboration, the Colorado Historical Society, the Denver Art Museum, and the Denver Public Library provide an absorbing visual and conceptual experience titled The Real West. Its strength is the manner in which the publishers have provided a novel visual statement through the color plates and photographs that comprise over 75 percent of the book.

The volume represents the effort of numerous individuals: Andrew E. Masich wrote the Introduction; Patricia Nelson Limerick authored the Commentary; Georgianna Contiguglia, Gwen F. Chanzit, and Eleanor Gehres collaborated on the Afterword. The text provides a frame of reference for the ...


Review Of Water, Land, And Law In The West: The Limits Of Public Policy, 1850-1920 By Donald J. Pisani, Robert Irvine Apr 1998

Review Of Water, Land, And Law In The West: The Limits Of Public Policy, 1850-1920 By Donald J. Pisani, Robert Irvine

Great Plains Quarterly

Donald Pisani's collection of ten articles published between 1982 and 1994 and four section introductions discuss the evolution of public policy and resource development in the West. Unlike some collections, this is an internally consistent examination of the complicated and interrelated history of water, land, and law.

The first section, "Water Law," explores the importance of prior appropriation in raising capital and transforming the landscape. Pisani cautions against environmental determinism, arguing that water laws resulted from case specific economic concerns rather than simple aridity. He also reasserts, his thesis that prior appropriation and water developments in the West were ...


Review Of All Over The Map: Rethinking American Regions By Edward L. Ayers, Patricia Nelson Limerick, Stephen Nissenbaum, And Peter S. Onuf, Thomas D. Isern Apr 1998

Review Of All Over The Map: Rethinking American Regions By Edward L. Ayers, Patricia Nelson Limerick, Stephen Nissenbaum, And Peter S. Onuf, Thomas D. Isern

Great Plains Quarterly

"People will think spatially and historically," observes Ayers in his essay on Southern identity for this book. "But we can be more self-conscious about the way we think in these dimensions." His remarks offer a good rationale for this collection of essays on American regions, originally a series of lectures delivered at Johns Hopkins University. In addition to Ayers on the South, the volume includes Onuf on the origins of American sectionalism, Nissenbaum on New England, and Limerick on the West.

For the student of Great Plains regionalism, every essay offers insights, either theoretical or comparative. Onuf, for instance, works ...


Review Of The Texas Military Experience: From The Texas Revolution Through World War Ii Edited By Joseph Dawson Iii, Charles Kenner Apr 1998

Review Of The Texas Military Experience: From The Texas Revolution Through World War Ii Edited By Joseph Dawson Iii, Charles Kenner

Great Plains Quarterly

The Texas Military Experience is primarily a compilation of papers read at a symposium sponsored by the Military Studies Institute at Texas A & M. The quality and scope of the essays, needless to say, vary greatly. Several, such as Paul Hutton's "The Alamo as Icon," Thomas W. Cutrer's piece on Ben McCullough, and especially Joseph c. Porter's meticulously researched study of Captain John G. Bourke's tour of duty on the Rio Grande, are especially well written and thought provoking. Hutton's sardonic but gentle dissection of the defenders of Alamo mythology alone would make the book ...


Review Of Goff On Goff: Conversations And Lectures Edited By Phillip B. Welch, Carl Matthews Apr 1998

Review Of Goff On Goff: Conversations And Lectures Edited By Phillip B. Welch, Carl Matthews

Great Plains Quarterly

Bruce Goff's career as an architect and educator spanned almost seven decades with some five hundred buildings designed and 147 built. In 1916, at the age of twelve, he was apprenticed to the architectural firm of Rush, Endacott & Rush in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and was promoted to partner at age twenty-five. After serving in the military in the 1940s and a brief practice in Berkeley, California, Goff accepted a teaching position at the University of Oklahoma, recognized for one of the most creative programs in the country during this period, and quickly assumed the role of Department Chair. He resumed private practice in 1955, having resigned from the University as the result of a scandal caused by a case of police entrapment. Regarded as an eccentric by many in the architectural establishment, Bruce Goff avoided identification with particular trends and was sought out by highly individualistic clients.

Goff on Goff: Conversations and Lectures is a collection of twelve transcriptions from recordings of lectures conducted primarily in 1953 and 1954 while Goff taught at the University of Oklahoma. Several are devoted to his major influences: Gertrude Stein's concept of the continuous present; Frank Lloyd Wright; Japanese art; and Claude Debussy. Perhaps Goff's greatest talent was his ability to internalize ideas from various sources and translate concepts into unique built environments.

Goff's design philosophies regarding feeling, order, honesty, ideas, and geometry are presented in several lectures. He acknowledged the important aspect of "feeling" in the development of architecture: "In architecture there are ...


Review Of The Frontiers Of Women's Writing: Women's Narratives And The Rhetoric Of Westward Expansion By Brigitte Georgi-Findlay, Karen M. Morin Apr 1998

Review Of The Frontiers Of Women's Writing: Women's Narratives And The Rhetoric Of Westward Expansion By Brigitte Georgi-Findlay, Karen M. Morin

Great Plains Quarterly

Georgi-Findlay takes on the seemingly impossible task of synthesizing one hundred years of women's writing about American westward expansion. While focusing each chapter on just a few key texts, she draws widely on the works of Anglo-American novelists, journalists, settlers, travelers, tourists, army officers' wives, missionaries, and teachers, writing about a geographical area extending from Mackinaw Island to Puget Sound to Santa Fe. The author constructs a female counterpoint to male renditions of frontier adventure and conquest, but at the same time explores how white women's cultural practices existed in complicity with American territorial acquisition.

The book's ...


Review Of The Making Of Sacagawea: A Euro-American Legend By Donna}. Kessler, Gary E. Moulton Apr 1998

Review Of The Making Of Sacagawea: A Euro-American Legend By Donna}. Kessler, Gary E. Moulton

Great Plains Quarterly

The basis for this book is a good idea: to discover the factors that have made Sacagawea a legend and then examine the ways in which the legend has evolved. Indeed, the author has done an excellent job in tracing Sacagawea's changing image, but a series of missteps detract from her laudable intent. The book suffers from repetitiveness, questionable literary devices, and lengthy accounts of the obvious. Squeezing out the superfluous would have yielded a sturdier essay of appropriate proportions.

Sacagawea may be the best known member of the Corps of Discovery after Lewis and Clark. Although she served ...


Review Of Ritual Ground: Bent's Old Fort, World Formation, And The Annexation Of The Southwest By Douglas C. Comer, Leo E. Oliva Apr 1998

Review Of Ritual Ground: Bent's Old Fort, World Formation, And The Annexation Of The Southwest By Douglas C. Comer, Leo E. Oliva

Great Plains Quarterly

Douglas Comer, archaeologist with the National Park Service, offers unique interpretations about the relationships among Anglo, Hispanic, and Indian Americans at Bent's Fort on the north bank of the Arkansas River during the 1830s and 1840s in southeastern Colorado. Long on theory and short on fact, much of this volume is developed from speculation rather than solid evidence. It is more about the importance of ritual than the history of Bent's Fort.

Comer argues that various rituals, including those traditional to the cultures involved and those developed to enhance their trade relations, help explain Bent & St. Vrain Company ...


Review Of Son Of Two Bloods By Vincent L. Mendoza, Domino Renee Perez Apr 1998

Review Of Son Of Two Bloods By Vincent L. Mendoza, Domino Renee Perez

Great Plains Quarterly

Vincent Mendoza's Son of Two Bloods, the 1995 winner of the American Indian Prose Award, is an honest and at times heart-wrenching autobiography. The son of a Mexican father and Creek Indian mother, Mendoza conveys his struggle to locate himself within either community. When Vincent was a child, his father moved the family away from a predominately Mexican neighborhood, and his mother allowed the boy to attend Indian school. Both circumstances contribute to the author's feeling "lost" about who he was: not quite Mexican or Indian. He is moved by the Mariachi music his father and uncle play ...


Review Of Portraits Of Community: African American Photography In Texas By Alan Govenar, Melissa Rachleff Apr 1998

Review Of Portraits Of Community: African American Photography In Texas By Alan Govenar, Melissa Rachleff

Great Plains Quarterly

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries photography grew in popularity and accessibility. Better technology in film and processing, which made the medium more economical and easier for the amateur to execute, proved photography to be both a creative and enterprising activity appealing to an ambitious middle class. African Americans were among those who took up the camera, traversing rural communities in the developing South in search of steady work. The more successful photographers set up studios in towns and cities, basing their practice on portraiture and commemorative photography. Alan Govenar's Portraits of Community: African American Photography in ...


Review Of Same-Sex Dynamics Among Nineteenth-Century Americans: A Mormon Example By D. Michael Quinn, H. Wayne Schow Apr 1998

Review Of Same-Sex Dynamics Among Nineteenth-Century Americans: A Mormon Example By D. Michael Quinn, H. Wayne Schow

Great Plains Quarterly

That cultural and temporal contexts continually reshape our perception of sexual reality is made abundantly clear in Michael Quinn's revealing contrast between the same sex dynamics of nineteenth-century America and those currently prevailing. Homosexuality (and consequently heterosexuality) as a concept of intrinsic personal identity has only relatively recently established itself in European and American cultural consciousness. Previously, the focus was simply on sex acts that were or weren't approved. Without "categories to define 'sexuality,'" Quinn asserts, "nineteenth-century Americans ... responded to homo-eroticism in ways that often seem restrained, even tolerant, today."

But homoeroticism was only one strand of a ...


Review Of Homeland To Hinterland: The Changing Worlds Of The Red River Metis In The Nineteenth Century By Gerhard J. Ens., D.N. Sprague Apr 1998

Review Of Homeland To Hinterland: The Changing Worlds Of The Red River Metis In The Nineteenth Century By Gerhard J. Ens., D.N. Sprague

Great Plains Quarterly

Studies of the Red River Settlement, the Metis people, and their buffalo hunt are so numerous that historians in the wider fields of Aboriginal or western Canadian studies have become increasingly impatient with this phenomenon of "Red River myopia." The question a reader must ask of this book is what new perspective Gerhard Ens brings to the existing material.

According to Ens, Homeland to Hinterland situates the local experience in a "broader process of economic change." Authors of previous works, he claims, were political historians writing about "the rise of a 'new nation' without adequately explaining the social and economic ...


Review Of Desegregating Texas Schools: Eisenhower, Shivers, And The Crisis At Mansfield High By Robyn Duff-Ladino, William H. Wilson Apr 1998

Review Of Desegregating Texas Schools: Eisenhower, Shivers, And The Crisis At Mansfield High By Robyn Duff-Ladino, William H. Wilson

Great Plains Quarterly

The author's thesis is that the school desegregation "crisis at Mansfield marked a significant milestone on the pathway to equality in the United States." She builds her argument through a painstaking reconstruction of the national, state, and local circumstances surrounding the failed attempt to integrate the Mansfield, Texas, high school in August 1956.

Nationally, the Supreme Court had issued its Brown desegregation ruling two years earlier, and President Dwight Eisenhower maintained his moderate attitude toward involving the federal executive in desegregation. In Texas, Governor Allan Shivers was determined to cripple desegregation. Shivers's powerful support of Eisenhower in 1952 ...


Review Of Bring Back The Buffalo!: A Sustainable Future For America's Great Plains By Ernest Callenbach, Ken Zontek Apr 1998

Review Of Bring Back The Buffalo!: A Sustainable Future For America's Great Plains By Ernest Callenbach, Ken Zontek

Great Plains Quarterly

"This book attempts to make a constructive contribution," writes Ernest Callenbach in Bring Back the Buffalo! The author hopes his work will assist in an unprecedented transformation of the Great Plains from "net-energy negative agriculture" to "net-energy-positive agriculture" that will produce a sustainable future for the area currently suffering from population loss, reliance on government subsidies, corporate consolidation of family farms, and environmental degradation. Such change remains contingent upon bison and wind power. Callenbach presents his argument in three parts. First, he recounts the remarkable productivity achieved on the bison-rich Plains prior to Euro-American intervention and its subsequent alteration. The ...