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Great Plains Quarterly

1998

Articles 151 - 159 of 159

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Review Of Views From Fort Battleford: Constructed Visions Of An Anglo-Canadian West By Walter Hildebrandt, J.R. Miller Jan 1998

Review Of Views From Fort Battleford: Constructed Visions Of An Anglo-Canadian West By Walter Hildebrandt, J.R. Miller

Great Plains Quarterly

Walter Hildebrandt, a former Parks Canada historian, explains that his interest in telling the story of the Battleford area in west-central Saskatchewan originated in the unease he felt beginning work with the federal agency in the 1970s at its tendency to diminish the role of aboriginal groups and valorize non-Native "pioneers," such as the mounted police, at the Fort Battleford historic site. Views from Fort Battleford provides a case study of the way in which public history, especially at historic sites, is contested terrain on which different groups vie to have their story told, or sometimes to have it dominate ...


Review Of Dancing On Common Ground: Tribal Cultures And Alliances On The Southern Plains By Howard Meredith, Victoria Lindsay Levine Jan 1998

Review Of Dancing On Common Ground: Tribal Cultures And Alliances On The Southern Plains By Howard Meredith, Victoria Lindsay Levine

Great Plains Quarterly

Howard Meredith has produced an ambitious and thoughtful study of cultural interaction and exchange among Southern Plains tribes in Dancing on Common Ground. The project emerged from discussions in an American Indian Studies course taught at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. Meredith demonstrates that the concept and practice of alliance-between individuals, between tribes, and between tribes and larger environmental and spiritual systems-has dominated Southern Plains cultural perspectives.

Using ceremonial dance as a metaphor for native systems of governance, the author examines the ideas of reciprocity and cooperative interaction in Southern Plains myth and religion. He even incorporates ...


Review Of Sod And Stubble: The Unabridged And Annotated Edition By John Ise, Craig Miner Jan 1998

Review Of Sod And Stubble: The Unabridged And Annotated Edition By John Ise, Craig Miner

Great Plains Quarterly

Sod and Stubble is a classic of Kansas and western history. It ranks with Giants in the Earth and O Pioneers! in readability and memorability, but has the added feature of being an only slightly fictionalized version of the reality of the lives of the author's parents in Osborne County, Kansas. Filled with striking stories, it is only a question of whether one is moved most by the baby dying after Rosie scalds her nipples, the drama of the grasshopper invasion, Henry's slow death by cancer and Rosie's tender goodbye, her farewell to the farm and to ...


Notes And News- Winter 1998 Jan 1998

Notes And News- Winter 1998

Great Plains Quarterly

Notes And News

Frederick C. Luebke Award

West River History

Western Literature In The Canadian Rockies

Defining The Prairies

Francophones In Western Canada

The American West, Promise And Prospect

Manuscripts For The Millennium

Manuscripts On The Indian Wars

Errata


Review Of Reuben Snake, Your Humble Serpent: Indian Visionary And Activist By Jay Fikes, As Told To By Reuben Snake, Paul A. Olson Jan 1998

Review Of Reuben Snake, Your Humble Serpent: Indian Visionary And Activist By Jay Fikes, As Told To By Reuben Snake, Paul A. Olson

Great Plains Quarterly

The Great Plains region has given us minority civil and cultural rights leaders out of all proportion to the minority population of the region: Crazy Horse, Quanah Parker, Gordon Parks, Dull Knife, Rudolpho Gonzales, Zitkala Sa, Suzette La Flesche, Earl Little (Malcolm X's father), Tomas Rivera, Ernie Chambers, and on and on. Biographical scholarship unfortunately has not given us many good accounts of these leaders. The gap is dramatized and at least partially filled by Fikes' book. Jay Fikes, working with Reuben Snake just before his death, has written a work that ultimately celebrates both the latter's humility ...


Review Of Lost Bird Of Wounded Knee: Spirit Of The Lakota By Renee Sansom Flood, Joe Starita Jan 1998

Review Of Lost Bird Of Wounded Knee: Spirit Of The Lakota By Renee Sansom Flood, Joe Starita

Great Plains Quarterly

Most writers would be hard pressed to encounter a better story line, a deeper, richer vein of raw material, than the one in Sansom Flood's book: a baby girl miraculously found alive beneath the frozen corpse of her Lakota mother four days after the massacre at Wounded Knee; adopted as a "souvenir" of the battle by a brigadier general, later the assistant US attorney general, who initially ignored her, then sexually abused her, and finally disowned her; raised by a doting mother, a tireless, world-famous suffragist, who steadfastly refused to abandon either her deeply troubled Indian daughter or her ...


Review Of Fort Worth's Legendary Landmarks By Carol Roark, James Wright-Steely Jan 1998

Review Of Fort Worth's Legendary Landmarks By Carol Roark, James Wright-Steely

Great Plains Quarterly

Few substantial cities in the United States can boast of such an impressive aggregate of preserved pre-Second World War architectural wealth as Fort Worth, Texas. Downtown "Cow town" is largely intact, featuring block after block of continuous shop fronts, brick streets, and terra cotta details scraping the sky. Business and nightlife abound in this vintage precinct, whose century-old courthouse still houses county courts. A secondary downtown at the Stockyards Historic District is past its prime as a sprawling slaughterhouse but today is the thriving destination for herds of tourists. Even close-in historic neighborhoods remain vibrant, although their occupants long ago ...


Review Of The Prairie Schoolhouse By John Martin Campbell, Sally Salisbury Stoddard Jan 1998

Review Of The Prairie Schoolhouse By John Martin Campbell, Sally Salisbury Stoddard

Great Plains Quarterly

John Martin Campbell, in this fine book consisting of sixty black and white, well conceived photographic plates and explicative text, has created an evocative picture of the prairie schoolhouses, the age from which they sprang, their environment, and the people for whom these formulaic structures fulfilled many functions. Older folks who grew up in the largely poor, rural areas of the vast American prairies will easily identify with Tony Hillerman's anecdote in the foreword, and they will surely experience a deep nostalgia and a profound sadness for the decay of the schoolhouse concept as well as the decay of ...


Review Of Cherokee Outlet Cowboy: Recollections Of Laban S. Records By Laban S. Records, John R. Wunder Jan 1998

Review Of Cherokee Outlet Cowboy: Recollections Of Laban S. Records By Laban S. Records, John R. Wunder

Great Plains Quarterly

Cowboy memoirs are not all that rare nor are they all that common. Thus, the reflections of Laban S. Records about his life working on the cattle trails and ranches of south central Kansas and northern Oklahoma during the last twenty years of the nineteenth century are of some inherent value. He worked as a freighter, a cowpuncher, a line rider, and a foreman. The book begins in the 1870s with memories of freighting on the Santa Fe Trail and concludes with Records converting to "the Gospel of Christ in its fullness" at a Methodist revival meeting in Kansas. It ...