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Great Plains Quarterly

1991

Articles 1 - 30 of 99

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Review Of A Life With The Union Pacific: The Autobiography Of Edd H. Bailey, H.Roger Grant Jan 1991

Review Of A Life With The Union Pacific: The Autobiography Of Edd H. Bailey, H.Roger Grant

Great Plains Quarterly

As the title of this modest volume suggests, Edd H. Bailey, the late president of the Union Pacific Company, has written for us his life story. Like typical railroad officials of the past, Bailey climbed the corporate ladder by moving through various positions in the operating department. After a youth spent on a woebegone homestead in eastern Colorado, he joined the Union Pacific in 1922 as a helper in the car department in Cheyenne, Wyoming; by 1965, he was the president and director. Although Bailey lacked a college education, his various "hands-on" experiences made possible his rise to industry-wide prominence ...


Review Of Historians Of The American Frontier: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook, Dan Flores Jan 1991

Review Of Historians Of The American Frontier: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook, Dan Flores

Great Plains Quarterly

As those who know him will attest, John Wunder's most important attributes as a scholar are his ability to brainstorm and his talent at infecting colleagues and collaborators with a contagious enthusiasm for interesting projects. Historians of the American Frontier: A Bio-Bibliographical Sourcebook is a product of those abilities, plus the research and writing talents of the authors Wunder has assembled. What emerges is a most important work on the early historiography of America's interaction with the North American wilderness. And as a book written by third and fourth generation frontier historians about the works and careers of ...


Review Of The Plains Of North America And Their Inhabitants, James H. Gunnerson Jan 1991

Review Of The Plains Of North America And Their Inhabitants, James H. Gunnerson

Great Plains Quarterly

Lieutenant Colonel Richard Irving Dodge wrote with the easy style of an experienced raconteur, drawing on twenty years of first-hand experience on the Plains. Most of his numerous anecdotes, however, date from the late 1860s and early 1870s. During this period he met an English promoter who encouraged Dodge to write the book. First published in 1876 it quickly went through two editions in England and two in the United States, all substantially edited. The present version, with only errors of spelling and punctuation corrected, is based on an unedited manuscript by Dodge and presents the work as he had ...


Review Of The Checkered Years: A Bonanza Farm Diary, 1884-88., H. Elaine Lindgren Jan 1991

Review Of The Checkered Years: A Bonanza Farm Diary, 1884-88., H. Elaine Lindgren

Great Plains Quarterly

Mary Dodge Woodward's keen observations, written in her diaries, serve to recreate days of bonanza farming in the Red River Valley of the North in the 1880s. Mary Dodge Woodward came to the Fargo area to live on a bonanza farm managed by her son Walter. A telescope extended Mary Dodge Woodward's view of the land stretching beyond the farmyard. "I stand at the east chamber-which is my observatory- with the spy glass everyday" (82).


Review Of Tum Your Eyes Toward Texas: Pioneers Sam And Mary Maverick, David J. Murrah Jan 1991

Review Of Tum Your Eyes Toward Texas: Pioneers Sam And Mary Maverick, David J. Murrah

Great Plains Quarterly

Paula Mitchell Marks's Turn Your Eyes Toward Texas is a dual biography of Sam and Mary Maverick, Texas pioneers who were eyewitnesses to the Texas Revolution and the exciting years that followed in its immediate aftermath. Based primarily on the personal diaries and papers of the Mavericks, Marks's work virtually personalizes the Revolution, beginning with Sam Maverick's arrival in San Antonio prior to its 1835 siege and the March, 1836 Battle of the Alamo. Even though he was a newcomer to Texas, Maverick played an important role in the San Antonio skirmishes and was elected by the ...


Review Of Ancestral Voice: Conversations With N. Scott Momaday, Kenneth M. Romemer Jan 1991

Review Of Ancestral Voice: Conversations With N. Scott Momaday, Kenneth M. Romemer

Great Plains Quarterly

We expect a collection of interviews with an author to provide the types of anecdotes, information, and opinions that often don't get into scholarly articles but do illuminate the author and his or her work. Charles Woodard's Ancestral Voice fulfills those expectations and goes beyond them.


Review Of The Complete Roadside Guide To Nebraska, Rosemary Thornton Jan 1991

Review Of The Complete Roadside Guide To Nebraska, Rosemary Thornton

Great Plains Quarterly

Alan Boye's guide is complete in ways that Nebraskans and others who travel in Nebraska would find useful and interesting. I read with a map in one hand and felt a recurring urge to get on the road and verify the existence of these places. Being a native Nebraskan, I have visited, camped upon, canoed down, or hiked across much of Nebraska. Boye describes all the familiar places as I remember them and summarizes their history. The heart of the book is found in the historical trivia, however, the human interest anecdotes about local people from little known places ...


Review Of Canyon Visions: Photographs And Pastels Of The Texas Plains, John R. Wunder Jan 1991

Review Of Canyon Visions: Photographs And Pastels Of The Texas Plains, John R. Wunder

Great Plains Quarterly

This is a beautiful book. Its beauty is fourfold. There is an allusive introduction by Archer City native, West Texas novelist Larry McMurtry, and lyrical words and phrases in an introduction and photo/portrait captions by Texas Tech University history professor Dan L. Flores. Then there are forty magnificent photos of the canyons of the Texas Plains taken by Flores and thirty-nine reproductions of pastels of the canyon landscapes of West Texas by Amarillo artist Amy Gormley Winton. The photographs and pastels are very effectively organized on separate pages facing each other and are arranged in five sections-"Elements," "Forms ...


Lowry Charles Wimberly And The Retreat Of Regionalism, Kathleen A. Boardman Jan 1991

Lowry Charles Wimberly And The Retreat Of Regionalism, Kathleen A. Boardman

Great Plains Quarterly

"The New Regionalism," an essay by Lowry Charles Wimberly, appeared in the summer 1932 issue of Prairie Schooner, already well known as a midwestern literary magazine. Wimberly, an English professor at the University of Nebraska, had been the magazine's editor since its 1927 founding (and would continue in the post until 1956). As editor and teacher, he unfailingly encouraged potential writers to "leave trace of themselves" and their region by using local materials. 1


Wyoming Political Surprises In The Late 1980s: Deviating Elections In A Conservative Republican State, Cal Clark, Janet Clark Jan 1991

Wyoming Political Surprises In The Late 1980s: Deviating Elections In A Conservative Republican State, Cal Clark, Janet Clark

Great Plains Quarterly

Wyoming is typical of the states in the upper Great Plains region (Montana, Kansas, Nebraska, and North and South Dakota) in many but not all aspects. In socioeconomic terms, the Great Plains are basically agricultural and rural with fewer prominent urban centers than elsewhere in the nation. Politically the region is generally viewed as conservative and Republican, but this image is subject to several important caveats. First, agrarian crises have periodically fueled insurgent political movements, such as the Populism of the 1890s, Progressivism in the early twentieth century, strong support for Roosevelt's New Deal, and support for populist or ...


Shaping The Growth Of The Montana Economy:T.C. Power & Bro. And The Canadian Trade, 1869,93, Henry C. Klassen Jan 1991

Shaping The Growth Of The Montana Economy:T.C. Power & Bro. And The Canadian Trade, 1869,93, Henry C. Klassen

Great Plains Quarterly

The principal Fort Benton merchant houses that traded with the southwestern Canadian prairies from the late 1860s to the early 1890s helped determine the growth and vitality of the Montana economy. Particularly in north-central Montana, the region dominated by Fort Benton, the Montana-Canada commerce played a key role. Fort Benton's two largest merchant partnerships, T.e. Power & Bro. and 1.0. Baker & Co., became leaders among the pioneers in the big business of Canadian prairie trade during this period. They created international marketing and purchasing networks for importing buffalo robes and furs and for exporting foodstuffs, ready-made clothes, metal ...


Stephen Crane's "Bride" As Countermyth Of The West, Jules Zanger Jan 1991

Stephen Crane's "Bride" As Countermyth Of The West, Jules Zanger

Great Plains Quarterly

It has become a critical cliche to recognize Stephen Crane's "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" as a parody of the traditional, cliche-ridden Western. His transformations of that form's conventional hero, heroine, and badman, as well as of the climactic, de rigueur shootout are amusing and obvious. In the story Crane depicted the Pullman journey of a middle-aged, honeymooning couple, Jack Potter, a Texas marshal, and his plain, "under-class" bride, to their home in Yellow Sky. There they are confronted by the rampaging Scratchy Wilson, the last of the badmen, who on learning that the marshal has taken ...


Notes And News For Vol.11 No.3 Jan 1991

Notes And News For Vol.11 No.3

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of The Cherokee, William L. Anderson Jan 1991

Review Of The Cherokee, William L. Anderson

Great Plains Quarterly

In The Cherokee Theda Perdue achieves superbly two goals-to give an accurate account of Cherokee history and culture from pre-white contact to the present while simultaneously dispelling any present misunderstanding derived from "unsympathetic, culturally biased and inaccurate reports."


Review Of The Quapaws, Charles G. Ballard Jan 1991

Review Of The Quapaws, Charles G. Ballard

Great Plains Quarterly

How to shake the hand of the unsmiling stranger in town and at the same time lose your shirt and all you own-such is the amazing and also tragic history of the American Indian. Although W. David Baird does not deviate much from the familiar and almost expected Jacksonian shakedown, he does offer succinct and at times moving accounts of how one formerly important tribe on the Mississippi-Arkansas trace was successively reduced in importance by its encounters with the French, the Spanish, and the Americans.


Review Of The Voice In The Margin: Native American Literature And The Canon, Charles G. Ballard Jan 1991

Review Of The Voice In The Margin: Native American Literature And The Canon, Charles G. Ballard

Great Plains Quarterly

Readers will find this heady mixture of postmodernist ideas and qualifications, Indianist viewpoints, and generous helpings of Native American material quite enjoyable and informative. Perhaps in this scholarly book the hors d'oeuvres, or the first several chapters, are formidable enough to drop the reader to his or her knees, but the effort required is indeed worthwhile.


Review Of The Kiowa, Maurice Boyd Jan 1991

Review Of The Kiowa, Maurice Boyd

Great Plains Quarterly

This brief and easily readable summary about the Kiowas from their early known beginnings to the present should be welcomed by Kiowa and non-Kiowa alike. Any general reader seeking an overview of the tribe will also find it helpful.


Review Of The Cheyenne, Gregory R. Campbell Jan 1991

Review Of The Cheyenne, Gregory R. Campbell

Great Plains Quarterly

The Cheyenne by Stan Hoig is one volume in Chelsea House Publishers' series on Indians of North America. The purpose of these volumes, according to general series editor Frank W. Porter III, is to examine the problems that developed as a result of Native American-European contact and to provide all Americans with a greater comprehension of the issues and conflicts involving American Indians today. If we evaluate this work against the series' goals, we must conclude that The Cheyenne is a somewhat disappointing effort.


Review Of The Arapaho, Lisa E. Emmerich Jan 1991

Review Of The Arapaho, Lisa E. Emmerich

Great Plains Quarterly

Among my treasured possessions is a photograph of three small children dressed in "Indian" regalia. The little boy and girl pictured wear fringed embroidered tunics and feathered headdresses; the baby-my father-sports a jaunty beaded headband with one feather. Taken in 1923, it captured their perception of Native American life: beads, bows and arrows, and buckskin. More than sixty years later, many children have a similar image of Indian culture. Native American historical revisionism may now be accepted in higher education but one look at primary school depictions of Thanksgiving suggests how little of the new scholarship has filtered down.


Review Of The Bpi Companion To The Western, Richard W. Ethulain Jan 1991

Review Of The Bpi Companion To The Western, Richard W. Ethulain

Great Plains Quarterly

Of the numerous volumes claiming to be guides to the cinematic Western, this book is by far the best. For once a jacket blurb is exactly correct when it reads: "Unsurpassed in scope and scholarship, [this volume] sets a new standard for reference books about the [Western]."


Review Of Farmers "Making Good": The Development Of Abernethy District, Saskatchewan, 1880-1920, Thomas K. Baldwin D. Isern Jan 1991

Review Of Farmers "Making Good": The Development Of Abernethy District, Saskatchewan, 1880-1920, Thomas K. Baldwin D. Isern

Great Plains Quarterly

Incidental to interpretation of the W. R. Motherwell home, in Saskatchewan, Canada Parks Service presents the community of regional historians with this excellent monograph by Lyle Dick, a historian at its Winnipeg offices. Farmers' 'Making Good" is local history of a high order, incorporating the best scholarship, rising to broadly regional significance.


Review Of Vulcan: The Making Of A Prairie Community, David C. Jones Jan 1991

Review Of Vulcan: The Making Of A Prairie Community, David C. Jones

Great Plains Quarterly

Vulcan is a long awaited study of the formation of communities in southern Alberta. It is an insightful rendition of the development of settlement, agriculture, social life, and society in the Canadian West. Starting with the common theoretical explanations of the origin and nature of western communities-including cultural, metropolis, frontier, and environmental hypotheses-it fashions a unique and complex interpretation.


Review Of The Comanche, Charles Kenner Jan 1991

Review Of The Comanche, Charles Kenner

Great Plains Quarterly

The Comanches were the only tribe from the Pacific side of the Continental Divide to carve out a permanent niche for themselves on the Plains after the arrival of Europeans and horses in the region. Although they based their life almost totally on the horse, the Comanches remained unique in many ways among plains tribes. They neglected the annual Sun Dance rituals and communal buffalo hunts common to other tribes and failed to develop a system of soldier societies to regulate various tribal activities. Despite the many scholarly studies of them, much needs to be explained about their societies, such ...


Review Of The Choctaw, Clara Sue Kidwell Jan 1991

Review Of The Choctaw, Clara Sue Kidwell

Great Plains Quarterly

Within the limitations imposed by writing a short book, Jesse McKee has presented a concise and readable history of the Choctaw Indians of both Oklahoma and Mississippi. Given the time period over which Choctaws came into contact with Europeans (beginning in 1541), the major political role they played in colonial conflicts among French, Spanish, and British, and the fact that they were effectively split into two groups after 1830, their history is very complex. McKee has managed to give a reasonable overview of the tribe, although his format leaves no space for highly sophisticated historical analysis


Review Of American Indian Autobiography, Charles Lachance Jan 1991

Review Of American Indian Autobiography, Charles Lachance

Great Plains Quarterly

Often a piece of scholarly literature is intriguing not because it is completely right but because it is somewhat wrongheaded. Such is the case with H. David Brumble's historical survey of American Indian autobiography. This is not to imply that Brumble errs in the details of his short history of Indian autobiography. Nor is it to say that he misconceives most of his generalizations on the subject. As an Indian or part Indian myself, I am repeatedly chastened by the formidable expertise displayed by non-Indians like Brumble who write on Native American culture. The argument of Brumble's informative ...


Review Of The Seminole, Susan A. Miller Jan 1991

Review Of The Seminole, Susan A. Miller

Great Plains Quarterly

The series Indians of North America, intended to introduce various U.S. Indian groups to an audience of young adults, features eyecatching design, tough construction, short bibliographies, boxed treatments of appealing topics, and short four-color photo essays. Although the Florida Seminoles merit such a study, The Seminole is too flawed to fill that niche.


Review By Plains Folk, North Dakota's Ethnic History, L. Martin Perry Jan 1991

Review By Plains Folk, North Dakota's Ethnic History, L. Martin Perry

Great Plains Quarterly

Plains Folk essentially completes its 1983 predecessor, Prairie Mosaic, authored by sociologist William Sherman. The earlier work outlined the landscape of ethnic groups that composed North Dakota, the state with the highest proportion of foreign-born residents prior to the Second World War. For the sequel, Sherman teamed up with a handful of ethnic historians to give extended treatment to the same folks: "Yankees," Germans from Germany and eastern Europe, Scandinavians, Slavs, and those with a more limited presence.


Review Of Art Of The Red Earth People: The Mesquakie Of Iowa., Mary Jane Schneider Jan 1991

Review Of Art Of The Red Earth People: The Mesquakie Of Iowa., Mary Jane Schneider

Great Plains Quarterly

One aftermath of European colonization of the eastern United States was the westward migration of many eastern Indian tribes. Among the hundreds of tribes that uprooted themselves and sought new lands were the Mesquakie, more commonly referred to as the Fox or Sauk and Fox, who migrated from the area around Green Bay, Wisconsin, into eastern Iowa in the late 1700s and adapted so well to their new home that they took unique steps to become permanent residents. In 1846, under pressure of Iowa statehood, their tribe sold their land in Iowa and moved to Kansas, but in 1856 the ...


Review Of Narrative Chance: Postmodern Discourse Of Native American Indian Literatures, Kathryn Shanley Jan 1991

Review Of Narrative Chance: Postmodern Discourse Of Native American Indian Literatures, Kathryn Shanley

Great Plains Quarterly

Back about eight or ten years ago, when Punk hit the American youth scene, there was a joke floating around. It went something like this: How did the dead baby get across the road? [Answer: Safety-pinned to the chicken.] Of course, in order to "get" the joke, you have to understand the Punk mentality and be able to recall instantly the joke that (as far as I can tell) has floated around children's playgrounds for the past several decades: Why did the chicken cross the road? [Answer: To get to the other side.] For Punks, the philosophically probing "why ...


Review Of The Potawatomi, Nancy Shoemaker Jan 1991

Review Of The Potawatomi, Nancy Shoemaker

Great Plains Quarterly

Clifton's The Potawatomi is one of a series of books in American Indian history designed for "young adults." Not-so-young adults will find the book of little use and would be better served by referring to Clifton's article on the Potawatomi in the Handbook of North American Indians.