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Great Plains Quarterly

1990

Articles 1 - 30 of 55

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Review Of South Dakota Leaders: From Pierre Choteau, Jr., To Oscar Howe And Over A Century Of Leadership: South Dakota Territorial & State Governors, Gilbert C. Fite Jan 1990

Review Of South Dakota Leaders: From Pierre Choteau, Jr., To Oscar Howe And Over A Century Of Leadership: South Dakota Territorial & State Governors, Gilbert C. Fite

Great Plains Quarterly

Special events in the history of a state have customarily stimulated an unusual variety of commemorative writings. Such is the case with the books under review, both of which grew out of South Dakota's centennial in 1989. Moreover, both books deal with one theme-leadership. One concentrates on political leadership while the other includes a broader representation.


Index To Vol.10 No.4 Jan 1990

Index To Vol.10 No.4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Centennial On The Northen Plains: An Introduction, George Mcgovern Jan 1990

Centennial On The Northen Plains: An Introduction, George Mcgovern

Great Plains Quarterly

Although I am now sixty-eight years old, I have thought of myself during the past half century since my eighteenth birthday as a young man. Perhaps that is partly because I have been blessed with good health and personal vigor, but it may also be because I was born and reared in a young State. South Dakota was only thirtytwo years old when I first came on the scene at Avon in 1922. My father, a pioneer Dakota clergyman, whom I always thought of as an old man, was born in 1868--twenty-one years before South Dakota achieved statehood. He knew ...


More Than Statehood On Their Minds: South Dakota Joins The Union, 1889, John E. Miller Jan 1990

More Than Statehood On Their Minds: South Dakota Joins The Union, 1889, John E. Miller

Great Plains Quarterly

"IT'S A GO," read the jubilant headline in the Huron Daily Huronite on 21 February 1889, one day after Congress passed the Omnibus Bill admitting four new states into the Union South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, and Washington.1 The following day, despite speculation that he might veto the legislation, President Grover Cleveland signed the bill into law, setting into motion a process that formally conferred statehood on South Dakota on 2 November 1889. For almost a decade momentum had been building in southern Dakota for this day, and people's frustrations with Congressional inaction had grown apace.2


Homestead On The Range: The Emergence Of Community In Eastern Montana, 1900-1925, Rex C. Myers Jan 1990

Homestead On The Range: The Emergence Of Community In Eastern Montana, 1900-1925, Rex C. Myers

Great Plains Quarterly

Mary Tanner saw homesteading as "a togetherness" learned from neighbors. 1 In 1915 she and thirty-two families shared that togetherness at Round Butte, Dawson County, Montana, clustered around a school and post office that bore the same name. Neighbors got together and threshed grain, raised barns, or brought in crops for neighbors "laid up" by accident or illness. That same cooperative effort extended to the formation of the Round Butte school and post office, to community social organizations, and ultimately to the creation of a new county, Garfield, in 1919.


Notes And News For Vol.10 No.4 Jan 1990

Notes And News For Vol.10 No.4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of Women With Vision: The Presentation Sisters Of South Dakota, 1880-1985, Sandra Schackel Jan 1990

Review Of Women With Vision: The Presentation Sisters Of South Dakota, 1880-1985, Sandra Schackel

Great Plains Quarterly

In the mid-eighteenth century, a young Irish woman, Nano Nagle, renounced her wealthy upper-class background and dedicated herself to ministering to the poor. Her belief in "women's potential as nurturers and ethical models for children" prompted her to establish several schools for needy boys and girls as well as to minister to the sick. After Nagle's death, the order she founded in 1776 became known as the Sisters of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and as part of a growing movement among Catholics in America in the ineteenth century, the Presentation sisters expanded their outreach to ...


"Proving Up And Moving Up": Jewish Homesteading Activity In North Dakota, 1900-1920, Janet E. Schulte Jan 1990

"Proving Up And Moving Up": Jewish Homesteading Activity In North Dakota, 1900-1920, Janet E. Schulte

Great Plains Quarterly

In the spring of 1908, Morris Zemsky, a Russian- Jewish immigrant homesteading in Ashley, North Dakota, sent a letter to the Industrial Removal Office (IRO) of the Baron de Hirsch Fund in New York. Joseph Kaminer, Secretary of the Ashley Farmer's Bureau, wrote the note for Zemsky, who spoke only Yiddish. The letter requested advice on the condition of Zemsky's parents "who are now in New York and are actually starving to death. As they are several in the family and no one of them can find work."1 Zemsky requested the IRO to send his parents to ...


Owen Wister : Wyoming's Influential Realist And Craftsman, Leslie T. Whipp Jan 1990

Owen Wister : Wyoming's Influential Realist And Craftsman, Leslie T. Whipp

Great Plains Quarterly

On 8 July 1885, while on his first visit to Wyoming, Owen Wister wrote in his journal, "This existence is heavenly in its monotony and sweetness. Wish I were going to do it every summer. I'm beginning to be able to feel I'm something of an animal and not a stinking brain alone. "1 Wister was being very candid and very appreciative in this statement of just how much Wyoming had done for him, but Wyoming was to be more fortunate and significant for him than he knew. Wyoming's affirmation of the animal in Owen Wister proved ...


Review Of We Fed Them Cactus, Felix D. Almaraz Jan 1990

Review Of We Fed Them Cactus, Felix D. Almaraz

Great Plains Quarterly

Concerned about a lack of recorded history of her family's contributions to the settlement of eastern New Mexico, Fabiola Cabeza de Baca in the 1940s began to compile data for a book that would focus on the cultural values of Hispanics who grazed their livestock on the high plains of the Texas Panhandle. Relying on oral traditions of family members, friends, and acquaintances, Dona Fabiola reinforced the narrative with occasional references to archival documents.


The Hispanic Presence On The Great Plains: An Introduction, Miguel A. Carranza Jan 1990

The Hispanic Presence On The Great Plains: An Introduction, Miguel A. Carranza

Great Plains Quarterly

In April 1989, the Center for Great Plains Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln sponsored its thirteenth annual symposium on the topic "The Hispanic Presence on the Great Plains." Scholars from across the United States and Mexico presented papers on a wide variety of topics covering the history, culture, politics, and images of people of Spanish origin on the Great Plains. These presentations focused on the Hispanic presence from the early Spanish explorers who entered the southern fringes of the Great Plains, to the vast migrations of Mexicans coming to "EI Norte" beginning in the early 1900s, to the creation ...


The Segesser Hide Paintings: History, Discovery, Art, Thomas E. Chávez Jan 1990

The Segesser Hide Paintings: History, Discovery, Art, Thomas E. Chávez

Great Plains Quarterly

T here is no doubt that the Segesser hide paintings are among the most novel and important artifacts of the Spanish Colonial history of New Mexico. As aesthetic works they are striking and as hide paintings they are unique. As historical documents they have already sparked revisions in historical interpretation of the period, providing valuable information on significant factors such as modes of warfare, uniforms and clothing, and the war panoply of the Plains Indians. As artifacts, they are among the most valuable acquisitions made by the Museum of New Mexico. Most important, their presence in the Palace of the ...


Plains Indians In New Mexico: The Genízaro Experiance, Russell M. Magnaghi Jan 1990

Plains Indians In New Mexico: The Genízaro Experiance, Russell M. Magnaghi

Great Plains Quarterly

T he colonial period in American history must, include not only the English experience on the Atlantic shore but the Spanish story in the Southwest and the approaches to the Great Plains. l Part of the New Mexican story is the emergence of a new people who become part of our multicultural experience, the detribalized Indians of the Plains and Mountains who were given the name genfzaros and were eventually absorbed into Pueblo-Spanish society. 2 The Spanish had tried to implement their Indian policy on the Great Plains, but frustrated by the environment and the native people, they remained in ...


Review Of Tejanas And The Numbers Game: A Socia-Historical Interpretation From The Federal Censuses, 1850-1900., Camilo A. Martínez Jan 1990

Review Of Tejanas And The Numbers Game: A Socia-Historical Interpretation From The Federal Censuses, 1850-1900., Camilo A. Martínez

Great Plains Quarterly

Prior to this work did we have a well-balanced portrayal of the Tejano (Mexican American) who resided in the South, Central, and West Texas counties during the last half of the nineteenth century? Evidently not.


Notes And News For Vol.10 No.2 Jan 1990

Notes And News For Vol.10 No.2

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


The Mexican Immigrant Press Beyond The Boederlands: The Case Of El Cosmopolita, 1914-19, Michael M. Smith Jan 1990

The Mexican Immigrant Press Beyond The Boederlands: The Case Of El Cosmopolita, 1914-19, Michael M. Smith

Great Plains Quarterly

During the first three decades of the twentieth century, a variety of factors-overpopulation, endemic poverty, inflation, stagnant wages, peonage, and, especially, the Mexican Revolution of 191O-drove hundreds of thousands of Mexicans from their homeland and into the United States. Although most of these migrants settled in the contiguous southwestern American states, tens of thousands proceeded north into the Great Plains and the Midwest, establishing dozens of colonias (settlements) in railroad centers, mining camps, industrial districts, and agricultural encampments. From 1900 until the Great Depression, the creation of these cultural islands of Mexican immigrants in such places as Oklahoma City, Kansas ...


Settlers, Sojourners, And Proletarians: Social Formation In The Great Plains Sugar Beet Industry, 1890-1940, Dennis Nodín Valdés Jan 1990

Settlers, Sojourners, And Proletarians: Social Formation In The Great Plains Sugar Beet Industry, 1890-1940, Dennis Nodín Valdés

Great Plains Quarterly

The sugar beet industry was in the forefront of the opening of the northern Great Plains to commercial agriculture. At the end of the nineteenth century, massive expanses of cheap land with ideal climatic and soil conditions were available on the Plains, but the sparse population afforded few farmers or field workers to block, thin, hoe, and top the sugar beets. Between 1890 and World War II, the sugar corporations devised three labor recruitment strategies that created classes of settlers, sojourners, and proletarians on the Great Plains. This essay examines the interaction between the sugar beet industry and its field ...


Review Of Views From The Apache Frontier: Report On The Northern Provinces Of New Spain, Ralph H. Vigil Jan 1990

Review Of Views From The Apache Frontier: Report On The Northern Provinces Of New Spain, Ralph H. Vigil

Great Plains Quarterly

This report on the northern provinces of New Spain was written in 1799 by Jose Maria Cortes, a lieutenant in the Royal Corps of Engineers.Cortes, an intelligent and keen observer, relied on personal observations and archival research to describe the Apaches and other Indian groups of the trans-Mississippi West.


Review Of Remote Beyond Compare: Letters Of Don Diego De Vargas To His Family From New Spain And New Mexico, 1675-1706, David J. Weber Jan 1990

Review Of Remote Beyond Compare: Letters Of Don Diego De Vargas To His Family From New Spain And New Mexico, 1675-1706, David J. Weber

Great Plains Quarterly

"Spain was but a stepmother to me, for she banished me to seek my fortune in strange lands" (130-31). Thus Diego de Vargas, a member of the untitled nobility, explained why he had set out for the Indies at age twenty-eight, leaving his wife and four children behind in Madrid. Thirty-two years later when Vargas died while on campaign against Apaches in New Mexico, he had not made his fortune nor returned to Madrid as planned. He had won fame, however, in New Mexico and New Spain. For his intrepid leadership of the reconquest of New Mexico following the stunning ...


Review Of The Plains Cree: Trade, Diplomacy And War, 1790- 1870., James Dempsey Jan 1990

Review Of The Plains Cree: Trade, Diplomacy And War, 1790- 1870., James Dempsey

Great Plains Quarterly

John Milloy's examination of the Plains Cree fits in with the growing concern for presenting histories that are not based on the European perspective but focus on events and issues relevant to a particular group's past. Although he is not a native, Milloy's portrayal of the Plains Cree's political and economic relations with neighboring tribes is a good example of how a "native" perspective can give new insight into historical events. For example, he points out that while the Red River area is important to fur trade historians, at other places in the West "significant events ...


Review Of New Directions In American Indian History, Michael Eastin Jan 1990

Review Of New Directions In American Indian History, Michael Eastin

Great Plains Quarterly

This appropriately titled collection of essays is the first volume of a continuing bibliographic series intended to supplement earlier bibliographies and further assist American Indian historians, especially newcomers to the field, in determining the relative merit of the hundreds of new publications concerning American Indians becoming available annually.


Review Of The Good Red Road: Passages Into Native America., Raymond J. Demallie Jan 1990

Review Of The Good Red Road: Passages Into Native America., Raymond J. Demallie

Great Plains Quarterly

In John G. Neihardt's Black Elk Speaks, the red road represents the path of life, of peace, and of the continuity of the generations. To many American Indians today it stands for the old, traditional ways, a state of being in harmony with the universe. In this book, the symbol of the red road has been generalized to embrace all humanity, a deeply-felt psychological sense of oneness and balance that serves as counterpoint to the frenetic lifestyle of modem America.


Review Of Home Town News: William Allen White & The Emporia Gazette, William R. Elkins Jan 1990

Review Of Home Town News: William Allen White & The Emporia Gazette, William R. Elkins

Great Plains Quarterly

Sally Foreman Griffith uses the life of William Allen White, noted editor of The Emporia Gazette, as the vehicle for an insightful examination into the "role of journalism in American culture." Acknowledging that her book is a biography, Griffith nevertheless makes clear that she uses White's career "as a window, or perhaps . . . a prism to observe the communication process as a complex interaction among communicator, audience, and medium, involving many different facets, including the psychological, social, cultural, economic, technological, and political." Put more simply, Griffith gives us a fascinating look into small-town (Emporia, Kansas) America and the forces that ...


Review Of Raising Less Com And More Hell: Midwestern Farmers Speak Out, Deborah Fink Jan 1990

Review Of Raising Less Com And More Hell: Midwestern Farmers Speak Out, Deborah Fink

Great Plains Quarterly

Raising Less Corn and More Hell will be inspiring reading for the political advocates organized around the Save the Family Farm Act; others will find insights on the symbols and themes that lie behind a highly visible rural movement of the 1980s. The bulk of the book, consisting of excerpts of interviews with fortytwo farmers and nonfarmers, mostly from Iowa and bordering states, gives vivid personal stories of the hard times of the 1980s. Pictures of many of the persons, set in the context of their daily work, help us to hear and understand the messages.


Review Of Mennonite Names/Mennonitische Namen, Reuben Goertz Jan 1990

Review Of Mennonite Names/Mennonitische Namen, Reuben Goertz

Great Plains Quarterly

Do not let the bilingual title frighten you away from this book. With the exception of the picture titles and the bibliography of the East German Commission of Cultural Research, everything that is written in German has the English translation alongside. The chapter on nicknames may lose a little of its subtle humor in the translation, but English readers will still enjoy the origins and meanings of the many nicknames listed.


Review Of Route 66: The Highway And Its People, Richard P. Horwitz Jan 1990

Review Of Route 66: The Highway And Its People, Richard P. Horwitz

Great Plains Quarterly

Quinta Scott and Susan Croce Kelly have crafted an affectionate contribution to the mythology of Route 66, the U. S. highway stretching from Chicago to Los Angeles. Kelly's eight chapters provide a detailed, illustrated chronology of the highway, from its "birth" in the 1920s through its decommission in 1985. The narrative cruises from humble beginnings and heroic visions, through hard times, to jubilation and inevitable decline. This saga frames the series of documentary photographs by Scott who features crisp views of roadside relics, cafes, and billboards from the route's golden age, and textured portraits of their aging owners ...


Review Of D'Arcy Mcnickle, Frederick E. Hoxie Jan 1990

Review Of D'Arcy Mcnickle, Frederick E. Hoxie

Great Plains Quarterly

This contribution to the Boise State University Western Writers Series is slightly more than fifty pages long, but it represents the fullest presentation of D'Arcy McNickle's life and work available in print. While two recent American doctoral dissertations (by Birgit Hans, English, University of Arizona; and Dorothy Parker, History, University of New Mexico) work their way toward publication as books and articles, this will stand as the handiest guide to the man and his work.


Review Of Folklife Annual 1987, Lynn M. Ireland Jan 1990

Review Of Folklife Annual 1987, Lynn M. Ireland

Great Plains Quarterly

Those of us disheartened by what seems to be an ever-increasing homogenization of American culture will find solace and hope in the pages of this attractive, well-designed book. Produced by the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, the Folklife Annual celebrates "the fact of our national diversity." Great Plains readers will be encouraged to discover a number of pieces directly related to this region.


Review Of A Community Transplanted: The Trans-Atlantic Experience Of A Swedish Immigrant Settlement In The Upper Middle West, 1835-1915, Niel M. Johnson Jan 1990

Review Of A Community Transplanted: The Trans-Atlantic Experience Of A Swedish Immigrant Settlement In The Upper Middle West, 1835-1915, Niel M. Johnson

Great Plains Quarterly

Robert Ostergren's A Community Transplanted is something of a smorgasbord, with a meaty main course. Ostergren has drawn concepts and methodology from various social science disciplines, which perhaps limits his readership. But the book does break new ground in the extent to which it measures, correlates, and evaluates a great number of socio-economic variables in the lives of hundreds of immigrants from a Swedish parish in the 1880s.


Corporate Point Men And The Creation Of The Montana Central Railroad, 1882-87, William L. Lang Jan 1990

Corporate Point Men And The Creation Of The Montana Central Railroad, 1882-87, William L. Lang

Great Plains Quarterly

On 21 November 1887, a crowd jammed Ming's Opera House in Helena, Montana, to celebrate the completion of the Montana Central Railway, a branch line of the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway. Sharing the Opera House stage that day were railroad executives and managers from the East, Montana politicians, and local businessmen. Their reason for celebration was three-fold. First, because Montalaans had struggled for more than a decade to get rail connections, sometimes nearly making unwise and unnecessary deals with railroad corporations, getting a railroad to build through Montana was cause for celebration.Second, the Montana Central brought with ...