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Great Plains Quarterly

1988

Articles 1 - 30 of 63

Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

Ethnicity, Religion, And Gender: The Women Of Block, Kansas, 1868-1940, Carol K. Coburn Jan 1988

Ethnicity, Religion, And Gender: The Women Of Block, Kansas, 1868-1940, Carol K. Coburn

Great Plains Quarterly

Ethnicity, religion, and gender shape our past, providing a richness and texture to individual and group experience. This experience creates identities and communities that in tum educate the young and ensure the transmission of values, beliefs, and culture across generations. The women of Block, Kansas, provide an opportunity to examine the complex relationship of ethnicity, religion, and gender. Beginning in the late 1860s, this German Lutheran enclave used its ethnic heritage and its religious doctrine to create a separate, distinct community in south central Miami County, Kansas. Trinity Lutheran Church and School served as focal points in the development of ...


Review Of The Cheyenne Nation: A Social And Demographic History., Russel Lawrence Barsh Jan 1988

Review Of The Cheyenne Nation: A Social And Demographic History., Russel Lawrence Barsh

Great Plains Quarterly

"Like every nation in the world," John Moore argues in this exceptionally candid and respectful study, "the Cheyenne have cosmopolitan origins." Building on the Cheyenne case, Moore convincingly challenges the persistent characterization of tribal societies as static "crystals" shattered by their collision with European states.


Review Of Rethinking Regionalism: John Steuart Curry And The Kansas Mural Controversy And Grant Wood: A Study In American Art And Culture., Richard W. Etulain Jan 1988

Review Of Rethinking Regionalism: John Steuart Curry And The Kansas Mural Controversy And Grant Wood: A Study In American Art And Culture., Richard W. Etulain

Great Plains Quarterly

In the first of these two volumes, M. Sue Kendall treats the cultural contexts that helped shape the paintings of John Steuart Curry and sparked reactions to his murals at the Kansas statehouse in Topeka. Emphasizing the details of Curry's life and how they interlocked with national, historical, and political happenings between 1937 and 1942, Kendall focuses particularly on the ideological and cultural attitudes that embroiled Curry, newspaper editors, and thousands of Kansans in the mural controversy.


Structure Of Agriculture And Women's Culture In The Great Plains, Cornella Butler Flora, Jan L. Flora Jan 1988

Structure Of Agriculture And Women's Culture In The Great Plains, Cornella Butler Flora, Jan L. Flora

Great Plains Quarterly

T he family farm has prevailed as a bastion of petty capitalism in the Great Plains. Although capital and labor are highly differentiated in the larger society, they are combined in the family production unit in Great Plains agriculture. In addition to being the economic base for much of the Great Plains from the settlement period onward, the family farm provided a cultural base from which a series of values emerged. Women were important in reproducing this culture that tended to stress agrarian values and the primacy of the family as building blocks for a community based on the values ...


Index To Vol 8 Jan 1988

Index To Vol 8

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of Konza Prairie: A Tallgrass Natural History, Paul A. Johnsgard Jan 1988

Review Of Konza Prairie: A Tallgrass Natural History, Paul A. Johnsgard

Great Plains Quarterly

This attractive book is perhaps the only one that has been written on the ecology of a single prairie study area; earlier classics such as J. E. Weaver's North American Prairie have dealt with North American prairies in general, and more recent titles, such as Terry Evans' Prairie: Images of Ground and Sky and Patricia Duncan's The Prairie World have typically attempted to show the often subtle and occasionally stark visual beauty of prairies, with an emphasis on color photography. By comparison, Konza Prairie approaches its subject (a protected area of about fourteen square miles in northern Kansas ...


Review Of Edible Wild Plants Of The Prairie: An Ethnobotanical Guide., Kathleen H. Keeler Jan 1988

Review Of Edible Wild Plants Of The Prairie: An Ethnobotanical Guide., Kathleen H. Keeler

Great Plains Quarterly

This wonderful and long overdue contribution to the regional literature provides a list of native edible plants of the prairie-grasslands and adjoining forest ecosystems. Kindscher is thorough and careful. She provides current and accurate scientific names of the plants as well as Indian and common names. Her detailed descriptions of the uses of the plants are taken from seventeen plains Indian tribes, from diverse settlers' journals, and in many cases from her own experiences of eating the plant. The line drawings are excellent and the helpful range maps make it easy to determine if a particular plant is likely to ...


Review Of Life Of Bishop Machebeuf., Lance Larsen Jan 1988

Review Of Life Of Bishop Machebeuf., Lance Larsen

Great Plains Quarterly

Original editions of this obscure diocesan biography, the major source of Willa Cather's Death Comes for the Archbishop, are all but inaccessible. The present reprint, an exact facsimile of the 1908 version, introduces to a wider audience the lively and memorable Joseph P. Machebeuf, first vicar apostolic of Colorado and Utah. To aid readers, the editors have included a bibliography, an index, and marginal asterisks pointing interested readers to a special notes section.


Review Of The Wolves Of Heaven: Cheyenne Shamanism, Ceremonies, And Prehistoric Origins., Robert Nespor Jan 1988

Review Of The Wolves Of Heaven: Cheyenne Shamanism, Ceremonies, And Prehistoric Origins., Robert Nespor

Great Plains Quarterly

Karl Schlesier contends that the Cheyennes (or, as he prefers, the Tsistsistas, excluding the Suhtai branch of Northern Cheyennes) made their "perfect adaptation" to the northern Plains long before the 1700s. Indeed, he argues that the T sistsistas emerged as an ethnic group on the Plains about 500 B.C., attaining an identity through observances of a ceremony, the Massaum, which continued to be celebrated into the early twentieth century. The Massaum is represented as having constituted the set of sacred relations between the people and the universe. With respect to the plains environment in particular, Schlesier represents the Massaum ...


Notes And News For Vol.8 No.4 Jan 1988

Notes And News For Vol.8 No.4

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


The Heart Of The Prairie: Culture Areas In The Central And Northern Great Plains, James R. Shortridge Jan 1988

The Heart Of The Prairie: Culture Areas In The Central And Northern Great Plains, James R. Shortridge

Great Plains Quarterly

Although the words Great Plains imply a physical region, they have been increasingly used to describe a distinctive set of cultural traits and values. The tone was set in 1931 when Walter Prescott Webb argued that attitudes and land uses brought to the Plains from humid lands would fail. Aridity, he said, was the central fact of existence in this place; it demanded a new approach to life. 1


Review Of The West Of The Imagination, Robert Thacker Jan 1988

Review Of The West Of The Imagination, Robert Thacker

Great Plains Quarterly

This is--in every meaning of the word-a wonderful book. Historian William H. Goetzmann, the author ofExploration and Empire, Karl Boomer's America, and New Lands, New Men has collaborated with his art historian son, William N. Goetzmann, to produce this volume, a companion to the Public Broadcasting System series of the same name. Focused on the illustrators, painters, and photographers of the American West, it offers a stunning overview of their histories, actions, and, most especially, their images. The reader, like the artist;s .and the Goetzmanns themselves, is awed by the felt pull of the West on the ...


Review Of Plains Folk: A Commonplace Of The Great Plains, Roger L. Welsch Jan 1988

Review Of Plains Folk: A Commonplace Of The Great Plains, Roger L. Welsch

Great Plains Quarterly

Plains Folk is a compilation of ninety-six human- interest essays written for a syndicated column published in newspapers from Texas to North Dakota. The reprinted columns deal with tidbits of history, folklore, agriculture, and humor from the plains region. The columns are brief and without documentation, as one would expect from a newspaper column.


Elaine Goodale Eastman And The Failure Of The Feminist Protestant Ethic, Ruth Ann Alexander Jan 1988

Elaine Goodale Eastman And The Failure Of The Feminist Protestant Ethic, Ruth Ann Alexander

Great Plains Quarterly

Elaine Goodale Eastman's childhood dreams of becoming a writer were not to be fulfilled as she imagined them. Her literary talent was subverted by conflicting forces in her life to which she also subscribed but that thwarted the artistic development of that talent. Although she wrote throughout her ninety years and couldn't remember a time that she wouldn't rather write than eat, she never satisfied "the notion ... unreasonably in the back of my head that someday I might write a book that would live."! If she is remembered at all it is as the wife of the ...


Review Of Cather's Kitchens: Foodways In Literature And Life., John P. Anders Jan 1988

Review Of Cather's Kitchens: Foodways In Literature And Life., John P. Anders

Great Plains Quarterly

As a cookbook, Cather's Kitchens is unexpectedly delightful. As a commentary on Cather's work, the Welsches could not have selected a more appropriate subject, as domestic art for Cather was art of the highest order. The authors expand upon Cather's domesticity by interpreting foodways as a pervasive motif in her plains fiction. For them, understanding Cather means understanding her food.


Review Of The Women's West., Suzanne L. Bunkers Jan 1988

Review Of The Women's West., Suzanne L. Bunkers

Great Plains Quarterly

The twenty-one essays in this collection represent some of the finest work being done in the ongoing re-examination of the American West through women's eyes. Based on papers presented at the first Women's West conference in 1983, these articles analyze faulty assumptions and omissions in earlier histories of the West; they examine the ways in which gender roles shaped western women's lives; and they formulate new methodologies for the analysis of women's private writings as vital historical records.


Prairie Schoolwomen, Mid-1850s To 1920s, In Iowa, Kansas, And Nebraska, Mary Hurlbut Cordier Jan 1988

Prairie Schoolwomen, Mid-1850s To 1920s, In Iowa, Kansas, And Nebraska, Mary Hurlbut Cordier

Great Plains Quarterly

The ideal schoolteacher of the mid-1800s was characterized by Catherine Beecher as an educated, unmarried lady who was "already qualified intellectually to teach, and possessed of missionary zeal and benevolence," she was ready to go "to the most ignorant portions of our land to raise up schools, to instruct in morals and piety, and to teach the domestic arts and virtues. I This description, as applied to the school women of Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas from the mid-1850s to the early 1900s, omits their unique characteristics and contributions. This article seeks to redefine the prairie schoolwomen as western women, both ...


Plains Women, Dorothy Schwieder, Deborah Fink Jan 1988

Plains Women, Dorothy Schwieder, Deborah Fink

Great Plains Quarterly

During the Great Depression, farm families throughout the nation experienced severe economic difficulties. Since then, historians and other scholars have analyzed and reanalyzed the basic problems of American agriculture and the solutions offered to those problems. Only recently, however, have the scholars begun to take a wide view of rural society during the 1930s and begun to look at the dynamics of the farm family: the roles, influences, and contributions of farm women and the work roles and treatment of farm children. 1


"There Is Some Splendid Scenery" Womens Responses To The Great Plains Landscape, Julie Roy Jeffrey Jan 1988

"There Is Some Splendid Scenery" Womens Responses To The Great Plains Landscape, Julie Roy Jeffrey

Great Plains Quarterly

During the decades of exploration and settlement of the trans-Mississippi West, travelers and emigrants encountered a new kind of landscape on the Great Plains. Aside from dramatic geological formations like Courthouse Rock, this landscape lacked many of the visual qualities conventionally associated with natural beauty in the nineteenth century. "It may enchant the imagination for a moment to look over the prairies and plains as far as the eye can reach," Sarah Raymond wrote in her diary in 1865, "still such a view is tedious and monotonous. It can in no wise produce that rapturing delight, that pleasing variety of ...


Review Of Helen Hunt Jackson, Valerie Sherer Mathes Jan 1988

Review Of Helen Hunt Jackson, Valerie Sherer Mathes

Great Plains Quarterly

Helen Hunt Jackson, considered by Emerson "the greatest American woman poet," was author of more that thirty books and numerous newspaper pieces and articles. Virtually forgotten today, she is ironically the subject of two short biographies written last year, although neither eclipses the one written in 1939 by Ruth Odell.


Womens Culture In The Great Plains : An Introduction, Helen A. Moore Jan 1988

Womens Culture In The Great Plains : An Introduction, Helen A. Moore

Great Plains Quarterly

Women, including plains Indians, European immigrants, blacks, and Chicanas, have always been essential to the development of Great Plains culture. Bounded by the patriarchal traditions associated with "women's place" in western society, women's diverse experiences are refracted through prisms of class, race, family structure, and work to create women's cultural legacies. In March 1987, scholars and other conference participants gathered in Lincoln, Nebraska, at the eleventh annual symposium of the Center for Great Plains Studies to address the theme of women's culture.


Notes And News For Vol.8 No.2 Jan 1988

Notes And News For Vol.8 No.2

Great Plains Quarterly

No abstract provided.


Review Of Land Of The Burnt Thigh, Sheryll Patterson-Black Jan 1988

Review Of Land Of The Burnt Thigh, Sheryll Patterson-Black

Great Plains Quarterly

Land of the Burnt Thigh recounts the adventures of two sisters, Edith Eudora Ammons Kohl and Ida Mary Ammons Miller, homesteading in South Dakota in 1907. "Timid as mice" and "city girls" at that, these young women are initially shocked by the rough frontier conditions they encounter but quickly rally to become successful homesteaders; Edith, in addition, becomes a newspaperwoman.


Review Of Emily: The Diary Of A Hard-Worked Woman, Alice Hall Petry Jan 1988

Review Of Emily: The Diary Of A Hard-Worked Woman, Alice Hall Petry

Great Plains Quarterly

Diaries are among the most unpredictable of literary genres: they can be fascinating, vivid renderings of what life was truly like during key periods in history, or they can be oddly flat, even tedious affairs-especially when they deal with the daily routines of obscure lives. Some diaries, such as Emily: The Diary of a Hard-Worked Woman, manage somehow to be both. Emily Louisa Rood, born in Michigan in 1843, was raised in middle-class surroundings and thus accustomed to some of the finer things in western life, including her own home and her own horse and buggy. But after bearing a ...


Review Of The Just Polity; Populism, Law, And Human Welfare., Peter H. Argersinger Jan 1988

Review Of The Just Polity; Populism, Law, And Human Welfare., Peter H. Argersinger

Great Plains Quarterly

Rejecting "political narrative" as "debilitating to historical scholarship.," Norman Pollack employs textual exegesis in this effort to construct a coherent intellectual history of Populism. Interspersing extensive quotations with his own paraphrases, elaborations, and inferences, Pollack examines a handful of Populist writings and extravagantly maintains that his work reconceptualizes both the nature and the study of Populism. After struggling through nearly 350 pages of opaque and often tumid prose, few historians will accept such claims. Even those sympathetic to this style of history, which ignores the specific political context of the documents analyzed, will worry about some issues that Pollack dismisses ...


Women And Technology On The Great Plains, 1910-40, Katherine Jellson Jan 1988

Women And Technology On The Great Plains, 1910-40, Katherine Jellson

Great Plains Quarterly

What is in store for the homesteader's wife? Nothing but to deteriorate ... the homesteader can do nothing but make a scanty living while his wife and family go unclad and scarely fed, with no conveniences in the home, no society, no preaching ... when you live where you can see sad-faced women, with their children crying about their skirts for things to eat, eager for even a drink of sour milk-good, pretty women, whose hair turns gray in a few weeks· of worry over where the work is coming from to buy flour-we then wonder if Uncle Sam couldn't ...


Review Of Mapping The North American Plains: Essays In The History Of Cartography., Donna P. Koepp Jan 1988

Review Of Mapping The North American Plains: Essays In The History Of Cartography., Donna P. Koepp

Great Plains Quarterly

The adventure of exploration and discovery, as well as the history of mapping, inevitably comes through in this volume of eleven scholarly contributions to the history of the cartography of the North American Plains. The 8 1/2 x 11 inch size allows for an easy-toread two column format and excellent black and white map reproductions, most of which are full page size.


Review Of Hunting And Trading On The Great Plains, 1859-1875, Glen E. Lich Jan 1988

Review Of Hunting And Trading On The Great Plains, 1859-1875, Glen E. Lich

Great Plains Quarterly

Combining James R. Mead's published and unpublished materials, Hunting and Trading on the Great Plains is a carefully edited memoir from the Kansas prairie in the 1870s-1890s. Mead (1836-1910) ventured west with young friends who planned to look and return; he stayed. And as his life turned from the outdoors to business and politics, Mead saw a wide spectrum of the frontier. He met Jesse Chisholm and Kit Carson, learned to value Indian civilization, and lived long enough to record his memories of these experiences.


Review Of On The Santa Fe Trail, Glen E. Lich Jan 1988

Review Of On The Santa Fe Trail, Glen E. Lich

Great Plains Quarterly

Twelve sketches populate this pleasant little volume about overland travel between central Missouri and central New Mexico from the 1840s through the 1860s. The informants include teenagers, military and government workers, an aristocrat, a European immigrant, an agent, and a peon. These travelers tell about hardships and danger as they crossed the "vast wild plain" in the years before 1880, when the railroad finally reached Santa Fe.


Review Of Ghost Towns Of Texas, Suzanne Lindau Jan 1988

Review Of Ghost Towns Of Texas, Suzanne Lindau

Great Plains Quarterly

T. Lindsay Baker, curator of agriculture and technology in the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum in Canyon, Texas, brings back to life eighty-eight Texas ghost towns. In describing each town, Baker relates its founding, its former significance, and the reasons for its decline. In addition, for each townsite he includes a map and full directions for reaching it.