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Full-Text Articles in Social and Behavioral Sciences

#Metoo Has Changed The Media Landscape, But In Australia There Is Still Much To Be Done, Bianca Fileborn, Rachel E. Loney-Howes, Sophie Hindes Jan 2019

#Metoo Has Changed The Media Landscape, But In Australia There Is Still Much To Be Done, Bianca Fileborn, Rachel E. Loney-Howes, Sophie Hindes

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Emerging in October 2017 in response to allegations of sexual assault perpetrated by Hollywood movie mogul Harvey Weinstein, #MeToo highlighted the potential for traditional and social media to work together to generate global interest in gender-based violence. Within 24 hours, survivors around the world had used the hashtag 12 million times.


Shores: Sharks, Nets And More-Than-Human Territory In Eastern Australia, Leah Maree Gibbs Jan 2018

Shores: Sharks, Nets And More-Than-Human Territory In Eastern Australia, Leah Maree Gibbs

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

In Australia, for eight months of each year Sydney's most popular beaches are laced with fishing nets. Stretching 150 metres (492 feet) across, and set within 500 metres (1,640 feet) of the shore, the nets are anchored off fifty-one beaches between Newcastle in the north and Wollongong in the south. The aim of the Shark Meshing (Bather Protection) Program NSW is to reduce the risk of dangerous encounters between sharks and people, and specifically to deter sharks from establishing territories (Department of Primary Industries NSW 2009, 2015). Program managers achieve such ends by devising and deploying tools and ...


Opportunities And Challenges To Improving Antibiotic Prescribing Practices Through A One Health Approach: Results Of A Comparative Survey Of Doctors, Dentists And Veterinarians In Australia, Annie Zhuo, Maurizio Labbate, Jacqueline M. Norris, Gwendolyn L. Gilbert, Michael P. Ward, Beata Bajorek, Christopher J. Degeling, Samantha J. Rowbotham, Angus Dawson, Ky-Anh Nguyen, Grant A. Hill-Cawthorne, T C. Sorrell, Merran Govendir, Alison M. Kesson, Jon Iredell, Dale Dominey-Howes Jan 2018

Opportunities And Challenges To Improving Antibiotic Prescribing Practices Through A One Health Approach: Results Of A Comparative Survey Of Doctors, Dentists And Veterinarians In Australia, Annie Zhuo, Maurizio Labbate, Jacqueline M. Norris, Gwendolyn L. Gilbert, Michael P. Ward, Beata Bajorek, Christopher J. Degeling, Samantha J. Rowbotham, Angus Dawson, Ky-Anh Nguyen, Grant A. Hill-Cawthorne, T C. Sorrell, Merran Govendir, Alison M. Kesson, Jon Iredell, Dale Dominey-Howes

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objectives: To explore and compare the knowledge, attitudes and experiences of doctors, dentists and veterinarians (as prescribers) in relation to antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance (AbR), and to consider the implications of these for policy-making that support a One Health approach. Design: A cross-sectional survey conducted online. Setting: Doctors, dentists and veterinarians practising in primary, secondary or tertiary care in Australia. Participants: 547 doctors, 380 dentists and 403 veterinarians completed the survey. Main outcome measures: Prescribers' knowledge, attitudes and perceptions of AbR, the extent to which a range of factors are perceived as barriers to appropriate prescribing practices, and perceived ...


Societal Perspective On Access To Publicly Subsidised Medicines: A Cross Sectional Survey Of 3080 Adults In Australia, Lesley Chim, Glenn P. Salkeld, Patrick J. Kelly, Wendy Lipworth, Dyfrig A. Hughes, Martin R. Stockler Jan 2017

Societal Perspective On Access To Publicly Subsidised Medicines: A Cross Sectional Survey Of 3080 Adults In Australia, Lesley Chim, Glenn P. Salkeld, Patrick J. Kelly, Wendy Lipworth, Dyfrig A. Hughes, Martin R. Stockler

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background Around the world government agencies responsible for the selection and reimbursement of prescribed medicines and other health technologies are considering how best to bring community preferences into their decision making. In particular, community views about the distribution or equity of funding across the population. These official committees and agencies often have access to the best available and latest evidence on clinical effectiveness, safety and cost from large clinical trials and population-based studies. All too often they do not have access to high quality evidence about community views. We therefore, conducted a large and representative population-based survey in Australia to ...


Wheat, Sheep Or Elvis Presley? Rural Australia Has Had To Change Its Tune, John Connell, Christopher R. Gibson Jan 2017

Wheat, Sheep Or Elvis Presley? Rural Australia Has Had To Change Its Tune, John Connell, Christopher R. Gibson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Rural and regional Australia have had a hard time of late. The economies of Sydney and Melbourne are growing, but much of the rest of their states are not. The population of regional areas is stagnating and agriculture is struggling. Perhaps worst of all there is a feeling that no-one in Canberra or in the booming coastal periphery cares about this. The people of Orange have apparently spoken. Outside Sydney, behind what seems like an impervious sandstone curtain, not all is well. Even the largest towns in regional New South Wales are struggling to retain their populations and have faced ...


Doctors' Perspectives On Psa Testing Illuminate Established Differences In Prostate Cancer Screening Rates Between Australia And The Uk: A Qualitative Study, Kristen Pickles, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik, Vikki A. Entwistle Jan 2016

Doctors' Perspectives On Psa Testing Illuminate Established Differences In Prostate Cancer Screening Rates Between Australia And The Uk: A Qualitative Study, Kristen Pickles, Stacy M. Carter, Lucie Rychetnik, Vikki A. Entwistle

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objectives To examine how general practitioners (GPs) in the UK and GPs in Australia explain their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing practices and to illuminate how these explanations are similar and how they are different. Design A grounded theory study. Setting Primary care practices in Australia and the UK. Participants 69 GPs in Australia (n=40) and the UK (n=29). We included GPs of varying ages, sex, clinical experience and patient populations. All GPs interested in participating in the study were included. Results GPs' accounts revealed fundamental differences in whether and how prostate cancer screening occurred in their practice and ...


Cities Of Australia And The Pacific Islands, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk Jan 2016

Cities Of Australia And The Pacific Islands, Robyn Dowling, Pauline M. Mcguirk

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

The Pacific region is a constellation of islands of varying sizes. Australia (the island continent) and Aotearoa/New Zealand (now carrying both Maori and Pakeha, or settler, names) dominate the region geographically and economically. However, many smaller islands are found in those vast realms of the Pacific Ocean known as Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Socially, politically, economically, and biophysically, this is a diverse region with diverse cities. In this part of the world, it is easiest to understand cities as forming two main groups: those of Australia and Aotearoa/New Zealand, and those of the Pacific Islands.


Gendered Responses To The 2009 Black Saturday Bushfires In Victoria, Australia, Joshua Whittaker, Christine Eriksen, Katharine Haynes Jan 2016

Gendered Responses To The 2009 Black Saturday Bushfires In Victoria, Australia, Joshua Whittaker, Christine Eriksen, Katharine Haynes

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This paper presents findings from a gendered analysis of resident responses to the 2009 Black Saturday bushfires (wildfires) in Victoria, Australia. One hundred and seventy-three people lost their lives in the bushfires and more than 2000 houses were destroyed. Previous research on Black Saturday has largely focused on issues of resident preparedness and response, with limited consideration of the role of gender in household decisions and actions. This paper examines the gendered dimensions of risk awareness, preparedness and response among households affected by the bushfires. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with over 600 survivors and a questionnaire of 1314 ...


Women Drinking Alcohol: Assembling A Perspective From A Victorian Country Town, Australia, Gordon R. Waitt, Susannah Clement Jan 2016

Women Drinking Alcohol: Assembling A Perspective From A Victorian Country Town, Australia, Gordon R. Waitt, Susannah Clement

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Gender is a key lens for interpreting meanings and practices of drinking. In response to the overwhelming amount of social and medical alcohol studies that focus on what extent people conform to norms of healthy drinking, this article extends critical feminist geographical engagement with assemblage thinking to explore how the technologies of biopower covertly materialised as bodily habits may be preserved and challenged. We suggest an embodied engagement with alcohol to help think through the gendered practices and spatial imaginaries of rural drinking life. Our account draws on interviews with women of different cohort generations with Anglo-Celtic ancestry living in ...


The Struggle For Legitimacy: Language Provision In Two 'Residual' Comprehensive High Schools In Australia, Stephen Black, Jan Wright, Kenneth E. Cruickshank Jan 2016

The Struggle For Legitimacy: Language Provision In Two 'Residual' Comprehensive High Schools In Australia, Stephen Black, Jan Wright, Kenneth E. Cruickshank

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Despite the contemporary policy rhetoric of global citizenry and the importance of languages and intercultural capabilities, language learning in Australian schools struggles for recognition and support. The curriculum marginalisation of languages, however, is uneven, affecting some school sectors more than others. In this article, we examine the provision of languages in two government comprehensive high schools, both low socio-economic status, located in urban areas in New South Wales, Australia's largest state. They are termed 'residual' high schools because they cater for the students remaining in the local schools while others attend either private or selective government high schools. We ...


Australia And Other Nations Are Failing To Meet Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines For Children: Implications And A Way Forward, Leon Straker, Erin Kaye Howie, Dylan Paul Cliff, Melanie T. Davern, Lina Engelen, Sjaan R. Gomersall, Jenny Ziviani, Natasha K. Schranz, Tim Olds, Grant Ryan Tomkinson Jan 2016

Australia And Other Nations Are Failing To Meet Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines For Children: Implications And A Way Forward, Leon Straker, Erin Kaye Howie, Dylan Paul Cliff, Melanie T. Davern, Lina Engelen, Sjaan R. Gomersall, Jenny Ziviani, Natasha K. Schranz, Tim Olds, Grant Ryan Tomkinson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: Australia has joined a growing number of nations that have evaluated the physical activity and sedentary behavior status of their children. Australia received a "D minus" in the first Active Healthy Kids Australia Physical Activity Report Card. Methods: An expert subgroup of the Australian Report Card Research Working Group iteratively reviewed available evidence to answer 3 questions: (a) What are the main sedentary behaviors of children? (b) What are the potential mechanisms for sedentary behavior to impact child health and development? and (c) What are the effects of different types of sedentary behaviors on child health and development? Results ...


Biopedagogies And Indigenous Knowledge: Examining Sport For Development And Peace For Urban Indigenous Young Women In Canada And Australia, Lyndsay M C Hayhurst, Audrey R. Giles, Jan Wright Jan 2016

Biopedagogies And Indigenous Knowledge: Examining Sport For Development And Peace For Urban Indigenous Young Women In Canada And Australia, Lyndsay M C Hayhurst, Audrey R. Giles, Jan Wright

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This paper uses transnational postcolonial feminist participatory action research (TPFPAR) to examine two sport for development and peace (SDP) initiatives that focus on Indigenous young women residing in urban areas, one in Vancouver, Canada, and one in Perth, Australia. We examine how SDP programs that target urban Indigenous young women and girls reproduce the hegemony of neoliberalism by deploying biopedagogies of neoliberalism to 'teach' Indigenous young women certain education and employment skills that are deemed necessary to participate in competitive capitalism. We found that activities in both programs were designed to equip the Indigenous girls and young women with individual ...


Configuring Urban Carbon Governance: Insights From Sydney, Australia, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Harriet Bulkeley, Robyn Dowling Jan 2016

Configuring Urban Carbon Governance: Insights From Sydney, Australia, Pauline M. Mcguirk, Harriet Bulkeley, Robyn Dowling

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

In the political geography of responses to climate change, and the governance of carbon more specifically, the urban has emerged as a strategic site. Although it is recognized that urban carbon governance occurs through diverse programs and projects-involving multiple actors and working through multiple sites, mechanisms, objects, and subjects-surprisingly little attention has been paid to the actual processes through which these diverse elements are drawn together and held together in the exercise of governing. These processes-termed configuration-remain underspecified. This article explores urban carbon governance interventions as relational configurations, excavating how their diverse elements-human, institutional, representational, and material-are assembled, drawn into ...


Into The Firing Line: Civilian Ingress During The 2013 "Red October" Bushfires, Australia, Carrie Wilkinson, Christine Eriksen, Trent D. Penman Jan 2016

Into The Firing Line: Civilian Ingress During The 2013 "Red October" Bushfires, Australia, Carrie Wilkinson, Christine Eriksen, Trent D. Penman

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

A major issue for bushfire management arises when residents decide to leave a safe area and enter the fire zone to rescue or defend their property, pets, loved ones or other assets. Here, we use statistical and narrative analyses of data from an online survey and semi-structured interviews with residents affected by the 2013 "Red October" bushfires in New South Wales, Australia. The survey results revealed that of the 58 % of respondents who were not at home at the time the threat became apparent, 65 % indicated that they attempted to get home prior to the arrival of the fire front ...


Gendered Dynamics Of Wildland Firefighting In Australia, Christine Eriksen, Gordon R. Waitt, Carrie Wilkinson Jan 2016

Gendered Dynamics Of Wildland Firefighting In Australia, Christine Eriksen, Gordon R. Waitt, Carrie Wilkinson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This article examines the gendered dynamics of wildland firefighting through analysis of employment statistics and in-depth interviews with employees of the National Parks and Wildlife Service in New South Wales, Australia. The statistics suggest increased gender equality for women following the affirmative gender politics of the 1990s in a previously male-dominated workplace. However, we argue these statistics mask how some patterns of practice surrounding fire management continue to reproduce a gendered workplace. Turning to the concept of hegemonic masculinity, we explore the ongoing gendered assumptions of this workplace and identify those that prove most resistant to change around bodies, masculinity ...


Planned Derailment For New Urban Futures? An Actant Network Analysis Of The "Great [Light] Rail Debate" In Newcastle, Australia, Kristian J. Ruming, Kathleen Mee, Pauline M. Mcguirk Jan 2016

Planned Derailment For New Urban Futures? An Actant Network Analysis Of The "Great [Light] Rail Debate" In Newcastle, Australia, Kristian J. Ruming, Kathleen Mee, Pauline M. Mcguirk

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

With urban and economic restructuring, facilitating urban regeneration for rundown post- industrial cities has become a central urban planning policy objective in Western cities since the late twentieth century, leaving some centres in prolonged social and economic decline. This chapter explores one example of planning policies seeking to regenerate an urban centre. Our focus is Newcastle, approximately 160km (100 miles) north of Sydney, Australia. Newcastle has a long history as an industrial city, dominated by manufacturing and coal-mining in the surrounding Hunter Valley. The port of Newcastle remains the world's largest coal export port. In 1999, BHP closed the ...


Identity Formation Of Lbote Preservice Teachers During The Practicum: A Case Study In Australia In An Urban High School, Hoa Thi Mai Nguyen, Lynn D. Sheridan Jan 2016

Identity Formation Of Lbote Preservice Teachers During The Practicum: A Case Study In Australia In An Urban High School, Hoa Thi Mai Nguyen, Lynn D. Sheridan

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

The article presents a case study of a growing number of English language background other than English (LBOTE) students in teacher education in Australia. Topics discussed include the impact of teaching practice in the identity formation of preservice teachers, the work experience of teachers in Australian schools, and the teacher identity.


Pacific Communities In Australia, Jioji Ravulo Jan 2015

Pacific Communities In Australia, Jioji Ravulo

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This report strives to provide a greater understanding and awareness of Pacific communities in Australia. Through the compilation of data gained from the 2011 Census of Population and Housing conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, this document is the first of its kind on reviewing the human geography of Pacific people across various life domains in an Australian context.


Health Promotion Practice, Research Ethics And Publishing In The Health Promotion Journal Of Australia, Stacy M. Carter, Annette J. Braunack-Mayer, Jonine Jancey Jan 2015

Health Promotion Practice, Research Ethics And Publishing In The Health Promotion Journal Of Australia, Stacy M. Carter, Annette J. Braunack-Mayer, Jonine Jancey

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This special issue of the HPJA focuses on ethics in the context of health promotion practice. This editorial takes a narrower focus: the issue of Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) approval for health promotion research, evaluation and quality assurance (QA). We will focus on three papers in the special issue: each argue that those working in health promotion should consider ethics from the very beginning of their research, evaluation and/or QA activities. The first paper, by Ainsley Newson and Wendy Lipworth, is entitled ‘Why should ethics approval be required before publication of health promotion research?’ In it they argue ...


Transforming Shark Hazard Policy: Learning From Ocean-Users And Shark Encounter In Western Australia, Leah Maree Gibbs, Andrew T. Warren Jan 2015

Transforming Shark Hazard Policy: Learning From Ocean-Users And Shark Encounter In Western Australia, Leah Maree Gibbs, Andrew T. Warren

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Killing sharks is a popular strategy for reducing risk for beach-goers and ocean-users. But the effectiveness of kill-based strategies is debated and the ecological and economic costs are high. In Western Australia the state government introduced new policy in 2012 in response to shark-related fatalities, to track, catch and destroy sharks deemed to pose an 'imminent threat' to beach-goers. This paper reports on a survey of Western Australia-based ocean-users, and pursues two aims: to develop an understanding of the experiences of ocean-users in encountering sharks; and to learn about the attitudes of ocean-users towards shark hazard management. The research finds ...


Trends In Legume Consumption Among Ethnically Diverse Adults In A Longitudinal Cohort Study In Australia, Victoria M. Flood, Joanna Russell, Sue Radd Jan 2015

Trends In Legume Consumption Among Ethnically Diverse Adults In A Longitudinal Cohort Study In Australia, Victoria M. Flood, Joanna Russell, Sue Radd

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Abstract presented at the Experimental Biology 2015 conference, 28 March-1 April 2015, Boston, United States.


An Assessment Of Dental Caries Among Young Aboriginal Children In New South Wales, Australia: A Cross-Sectional Study, Leanne Smith, Anthony Blinkhorn, Rachael Moir, Ngiare J. Brown, Fiona Blinkhorn Jan 2015

An Assessment Of Dental Caries Among Young Aboriginal Children In New South Wales, Australia: A Cross-Sectional Study, Leanne Smith, Anthony Blinkhorn, Rachael Moir, Ngiare J. Brown, Fiona Blinkhorn

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Background: Limited research has been undertaken in Australia to assess the dental status of pre-school Aboriginal children. This cross-sectional study records the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (dmft) and surfaces (dmfs) of pre-school Aboriginal children living in different locations in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Methods: A convenience sample of young children from seven Aboriginal communities in rural, remote and metropolitan areas of NSW, was recruited. One calibrated examiner recorded the dmft/s of children with written parental consent. Results: 196 children were invited to participate and 173 children aged two to five years were examined, a response ...


The Contribution Of Genre Theory To Literacy Education In Australia, Beverly M. Derewianka Jan 2015

The Contribution Of Genre Theory To Literacy Education In Australia, Beverly M. Derewianka

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This chapter traces the history of genre theory and pedagogy in Australia, its current status and reflections on future prospects.


Knowledge Of, Beliefs About, And Perceived Barriers To Organ And Tissue Donation In Serbian, Macedonian, And Greek Orthodox Communities In Australia, Lyn Phillipson, Karen M. Larsen-Truong, Leissa Pitts, Miriam Nonu Jan 2015

Knowledge Of, Beliefs About, And Perceived Barriers To Organ And Tissue Donation In Serbian, Macedonian, And Greek Orthodox Communities In Australia, Lyn Phillipson, Karen M. Larsen-Truong, Leissa Pitts, Miriam Nonu

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Context-Despite the lifesaving benefits of organ and tissue donation, a worldwide shortage of suitable and registered donors exists. Although the reasons for this shortage are multifactorial, it has been recognized that distinct barriers to registration, family discussion, and consent that require targeted intervention and action are present among minority cultural, religious, and immigrant communities. Objective-To explore the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of 3 orthodox religious communities in Australia (Macedonian, Greek, and Serbian Orthodox) and determine the implications for engaging with these communities to improve knowledge, attitudes, family discussion, and the ability to make an informed decision about donation ...


Landscape Preferences, Amenity, And Bushfire Risk In New South Wales, Australia, Nicholas J. Gill, Olivia V. Dun, Christopher R. Brennan-Horley, Christine Eriksen Jan 2015

Landscape Preferences, Amenity, And Bushfire Risk In New South Wales, Australia, Nicholas J. Gill, Olivia V. Dun, Christopher R. Brennan-Horley, Christine Eriksen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

This paper examines landscape preferences of residents in amenity-rich bushfire-prone landscapes in New South Wales, Australia. Insights are provided into vegetation preferences in areas where properties neighbor large areas of native vegetation, such as national parks, or exist within a matrix of cleared and vegetated private and public land. In such areas, managing fuel loads in the proximity of houses is likely to reduce the risk of house loss and damage. Preferences for vegetation appearance and structure were related to varying fuel loads, particularly the density of understorey vegetation and larger trees. The study adopted a qualitative visual research approach ...


Corporate Social Responsibility Programs Of Big Food In Australia: A Content Analysis Of Industry Documents, Zoe Richards, Samantha L. Thomas, Melanie J. Randle, Simone Pettigrew Jan 2015

Corporate Social Responsibility Programs Of Big Food In Australia: A Content Analysis Of Industry Documents, Zoe Richards, Samantha L. Thomas, Melanie J. Randle, Simone Pettigrew

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Objective: To examine Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) tactics by identifying the key characteristics of CSR strategies as described in the corporate documents of selected 'Big Food' companies. Methods: A mixed methods content analysis was used to analyse the information contained on Australian Big Food company websites. Data sources included company CSR reports and web-based content that related to CSR initiatives employed in Australia. Results: A total of 256 CSR activities were identified across six organisations. Of these, the majority related to the categories of environment (30.5%), responsibility to consumers (25.0%) or community (19.5%). Conclusions: Big Food companies ...


Opinion: The Case For Free Universal Childcare In Australia, Edward Melhuish Jan 2015

Opinion: The Case For Free Universal Childcare In Australia, Edward Melhuish

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Many countries, such as the UK, are providing free universal childcare for children aged 3 and up. They have done so because they recognise that improving child development for the whole population will be important for future economic development. Should Australia follow their lead?


The Poppy Research Programme Protocol: Investigating Opioid Utilisation, Costs And Patterns Of Extramedical Use In Australia, Louisa Degenhardt, Bianca Blanch, Natasa Gisev, Briony K. Larance, Sallie-Anne Pearson Jan 2015

The Poppy Research Programme Protocol: Investigating Opioid Utilisation, Costs And Patterns Of Extramedical Use In Australia, Louisa Degenhardt, Bianca Blanch, Natasa Gisev, Briony K. Larance, Sallie-Anne Pearson

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Introduction Opioid prescribing is increasing in many countries. In Australia, there is limited research on patterns of prescribing and access, or the outcomes associated with this use. The aim of this research programme is to use national dispensing data to estimate opioid use and costs, including problematic or extramedical use in the Australian population. Methods and analysis In a cohort of persons dispensed at least one opioid in 2013, we will estimate monthly utilisation and costs of prescribed opioids, overall and according to individual opioid formulations and strengths. In a cohort of new opioid users, commencing therapy between 1 July ...


The Experience Of Melanoma Follow-Up Care: An Online Survey Of Patients In Australia, Janine Mitchell, Peta Callaghan, Jacqueline M. Street, Susan Neuhaus, Taryn Bessen Jan 2014

The Experience Of Melanoma Follow-Up Care: An Online Survey Of Patients In Australia, Janine Mitchell, Peta Callaghan, Jacqueline M. Street, Susan Neuhaus, Taryn Bessen

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Investigating patients' reports on the quality and consistency of melanoma follow-up care in Australia would assist in evaluating if this care is effective and meeting patients' needs. The objective of this study was to obtain and explore the patients' account of the technical and interpersonal aspects of melanoma follow-up care received. An online survey was conducted to acquire details of patients' experience. Participants were patients treated in Australia for primary melanoma. Qualitative and quantitative data about patient perceptions of the nature and quality of their follow-up care were collected, including provision of melanoma specific information, psychosocial support, and imaging tests ...


Climate Change And Australia, Lesley Head, Michael Adams, Helen Mcgregor, Stephanie Toole Jan 2014

Climate Change And Australia, Lesley Head, Michael Adams, Helen Mcgregor, Stephanie Toole

Faculty of Social Sciences - Papers

Australia has had a variable and mostly arid climate as long as humans have been on the continent. Historically observed trends toward increased warming, with rainfall increases in many tropical areas and rainfall decreases in many temperate areas, are projected to continue. Impacts will be geographically variable but mostly negative for biodiversity, agriculture, and infrastructure. Extreme events such as bushfires and floods will increase in frequency and intensity, concentrated in summer. With an economy heavily dependent on coal for domestic electricity generation and as an export commodity, Australians are high per capita contributors to anthropogenic climate change. A quarter-century of ...